Pyranine
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Pyranine
Pyranine
Skeletal formula of pyranine
Space-filling model of pyranine as a sodium salt
Names
IUPAC name
Trisodium 8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate
Other names
8-Hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid; Solvent Green 7; HPTS; Sulfonated hydroxy pyrene trisodium salt
Identifiers
  • 6358-69-6 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ECHA InfoCard 100.026.166 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 228-783-6
UNII
  • C1=CC2=C3C(=C(C=C2S(=O)(=O)[O-])S(=O)(=O)[O-])C=CC4=C(C=C(C1=C43)O)S(=O)(=O)[O-].[Na+].[Na+].[Na+]
Properties
C16H7Na3O10S3
Molar mass  g·mol-1
Appearance Yellow-green crystalline powder
Soluble
Hazards
Main hazards XI
R-phrases (outdated) R36/37/38
S-phrases (outdated) S26-S36
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Pyranine is a hydrophilic, pH-sensitive fluorescent dye from the group of chemicals known as arylsulfonates.[1][2] Pyranine is soluble in water and has applications as a coloring agent, biological stain, optical detecting reagent, and a pH indicator.[3][4] One example would be the measurement of intracellular pH.[5] Pyranine is also found in yellow highlighters, giving them their characteristic fluorescence and bright yellow-green colour. It is also found in some types of soap.[6]

Synthesis

It is synthesized from pyrenetetrasulfonic acid and a solution of sodium hydroxide in water under reflux.[7] The trisodium salt crystallizes as yellow needles when adding an aqueous solution of sodium chloride.

See also

References

  1. ^ "chem industry entry".
  2. ^ "Comparative Toxicogenomics Database entry".
  3. ^ "chemical land 21 entry".
  4. ^ "Sci-Toys entry".
  5. ^ "Loading pyranine via purinergic receptors Bing by Siang Gan".
  6. ^ http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=chem&id=92
  7. ^ Tietze, Ernst; Bayer, Otto (1939). "Die Sulfosäuren des Pyrens und ihre Abkömmlinge". Justus Liebig's Annalen der Chemie. 540 (1): 189-210. doi:10.1002/jlac.19395400113. ISSN 0075-4617.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Pyranine
 



 



 
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