Moscow Dialect
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Moscow Dialect

The Moscow dialect or Moscow accent (Russian: ? , tr. Moskovskoye proiznosheniye, IPA: [m?'skofsk?j? przn?'?en]), sometimes Central Russian,[1] is the spoken Russian language variety used in Moscow - one of the two major pronunciation norms of the Russian language alongside the Saint Petersburg norm. Influenced by both Northern and Southern Russian dialects,[2] the Moscow dialect is the basis of the Russian literary language.[3]

Overview

The 1911 edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica wrote:[4]

Literary Russian as spoken by educated people throughout the empire is the Moscow dialect... The Moscow dialect really covers a very small area, not even the whole of the government of Moscow, but political causes have made it the language of the governing classes and hence of literature. It is a border dialect, having the southern pronunciation of unaccented o as a, but the jo for accented o before a hard consonant it is akin to the North and it has also kept the northern pronunciation of g instead of the southern h. So too unaccented e sounds like i or ji'.

Examples

Dialect ?
I see

what

nothing
Explanation
Moscow and Central Russia [p?'n?atn?] [?to] [nt'vo] Unstressed /o/ becomes [?] or [?].
⟨?⟩ is pronounced [?].
Intervocalic ⟨?⟩ is pronounced [v].
The North ponjatno ?to ni?evo
Old St. Petersburg panjatna ?to ni?ego
The South panjatna ?to ni?evo
Source: [1]

References

  1. ^ a b Rough Guide Phrasebook: Russian (Updated ed.). London: Penguin. 2012. pp. 16-17. ISBN 9781405390576.
  2. ^ Sokol?ski?, A. A. (1966). A history of the Russian language. Impr. Taravilla. p. 106.
  3. ^ ?, (1971). The Russian language; a brief history. Translated by Forsyth, Mary A. Edited by James Forsyth. Cambridge University Press. p. 15. ISBN 9780521079440.
  4. ^ Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Russian Language". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. pp. 913-914.

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