Marcus Nispel
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Marcus Nispel

Marcus Nispel
Born
Occupationfilm director, producer

Marcus Nispel is a German feature film director and producer, as well as a director of television commercials and music videos. He started a production company with partner Anouk (Frankel) Nora Portfolio Artists Network which later merged with RSA (Ridley Scott Associates) Black Dog Films to form Portfolio/Black Dog. He also worked at RSA as a commercial director for several years.

In 2015, Nispel directed the ghost exorcism film Exeter, formerly titled Backmask.[1]

History

Nispel was born in Frankfurt.[2] He grew up near McNair Barracks and was able to learn English from hanging out with children of soldiers.[3] At the age of 15, he got a job at a boutique called Hessler and Kehrer. When he had his first interview at an American ad agency, he was asked what do Oreos mean, and he realized the importance of understanding American culture, and how working in advertising helped him understand that.[4] He received a Fulbright Scholarship at the age of 20 and attended Brooklyn College and New York Institute of Technology. He was also an art director for Young & Rubicam.

Nispel was set to make his directorial debut with the film End of Days, but stepped down before shooting due to issues with the budget. He found that films with large budgets would end up not letting him do anything with them. Around the same time, a 64-page manifesto he had wrote for on-set demands was leaked publicly.[5]

In 2000, Nispel ran a print ad in Shoot for a temporary office in South Africa in the wake of a union strike. The ad depicted an old African woman's breasts with the tagline, "In South Africa, this is what SAG means." The ad was decried by SAG as anti-union and racist, and after an apology was issued from Ridley and Tony Scott, Nispel was forced to resign from RSA, along with two other employees involved with the ad. He later signed to MJZ for commercial work.[6]

In 2002, Nispel signed on to direct The Texas Chainsaw Massacre.[7] He was initially opposed to remaking the film, but Daniel Pearl, the cinematographer for the original film and regular collaborator with Nispel, convinced him to direct. The film was released on October 17, 2003 to negative reviews but was financially successful, grossing $107 million worldwide.

After directing The Texas Chainsaw Massacre, Nispel signed on to direct a psychological thriller called Need, starring Diane Lane.[8] He picked the film as he wanted something 'diametrically opposed to TCM', but it was never released.

Personal life

He is married to singer/songwriter/commercial editor Dyan Humes-Nispel, who has written songs for various artists including Whitney Houston.[9][unreliable source?]

Filmography

Film

Year Title Director Producer Writer Notes
2003 The Texas Chainsaw Massacre Yes
2004 Frankenstein Yes Yes
2007 Pathfinder Yes Yes
2009 Friday the 13th Yes
2011 Conan the Barbarian Yes
2015 Exeter Yes Yes Yes Story By

Trailers

Videography

[11] [12]

1990

1991

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

1999

2000

2001

2006

References

  1. ^ "Awful Trailer for 'F13' and 'Chainsaw' Director's 'Exeter' - Bloody Disgusting". Bloody-disgusting.com. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ Nispel, Marcus (10 April 2013). "Marcus Nispel: "Directing Is a Mixture of Symphony and Jazz"". My First Shoot (Interview). Interviewed by Paul Stone. Retrieved 2020.
  3. ^ Patrizio, Andy (25 March 2004). "An Interview with Marcus Nispel". IGN. Retrieved 2020.
  4. ^ "Marcus Nispel". Adweek. 10 October 2003. Retrieved 2020.
  5. ^ Cox, Dan; Carver, Benedict (10 August 1998). "World according to Nispel". Variety. Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ "South Africa or Bust". AdAge. 1 June 2000. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ Harris, Dana (7 May 2002). "Nispel to direct remake of 'Chainsaw Massacre'". Variety. Retrieved 2020.
  8. ^ McNary, Dave (3 November 2003). "'Chainsaw' helmer feeds his 'Need'". Variety. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ "Dyan Humes". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2017.
  10. ^ LaPorte, Nicole (2 May 2004). "Nispel takes an 'Evil' turn". Variety. Archived from the original on 4 December 2017.
  11. ^ Garcia, Alex S. "mvdbase.com - Marcus Nispel technician videography". Music Video DataBase. Archived from the original on 21 September 2018. Retrieved 2015.
  12. ^ Nispel, Marcus. "complex.com - 15 most accomplished music video directors - Marcus Nispel". Music Video. Retrieved 2011.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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