Las Estrellas
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Las Estrellas

Las Estrellas
TypeTerrestrial television network
Country
Mexico
AvailabilityMexico
Europe
Latin America
MottoLas Estrellas
(The Stars)
Licence area
National
HeadquartersAv Chapultepec 28, Doctores, Cuauhtémoc, 06720 Mexico City
Broadcast area
National
AreaMexico
OwnerTelevisa (merger with Univision Communications pending)
Launch date
21 March 1951 (1951-03-21)
Picture format
480i (16:9 SDTV)
1080i (HDTV)ATSC
OTA National
(Except Tijuana)
Channel 2
OTA Tijuana
Channel 19
Channel 102 (SD)
Channel 1102 (HD)
Channel 102 (SD)
Channel 1102 (HD)
International channel
Las Estrellas Internacional
Official website
www.lasestrellas.tv

Las Estrellas ("The Stars"; previously El Canal de las Estrellas, or "The Channel of the Stars") is one of the cornerstone networks of Televisa, with affiliate stations all over Mexico, flagshipped at XEW-TDT in Mexico City. Many of the programs of Las Estrellas are seen in the United States on Univision, UniMás, and Galavisión.[1]

History

Las Estrellas originated from XEW-TV, which began broadcasting on 21 March 1951. The channel was a sister station to the legendary XEW-AM radio station, owned by Emilio Azcárraga Vidaurreta, which was also the owner of the newly-launched channel. It was the second commercial TV channel to be established in Mexico City, after XHTV channel 4, owned by the Novedades newspaper. XEW-TV's first transmission was a live, play-by-play, outside broadcast of a Mexican League match, with XEW radio veteran Pedro Septién on commentary duties. Other than live sports broadcasts, XEW-TV initially broadcast films from the Golden Age of Mexican cinema, as its studios in Chapultepec 18 were still under construction. The studio complex, known as Televicentro, would be inaugurated in January 1952. Soon thereafter, the programming scope would be expanded to include live variety shows and television theatre showcases, in a style similar to XEW radio's similarly formatted shows.

XEW-TV would be a pioneer in Mexican television, and would establish many industry firsts. In 1962, the channel would become the flagship network of the newly merged Telesistema Mexicano, which also brought XHTV and XHGC under Azcárraga's hands, and, after merging with XHTM-TV and Televisión Independiente de México, many of these station's programs would move to XEW-TV. As a result, XEW-TV rapidly grew and became the country's most watched TV network, a position which was undisputed for many years, as Televisa held a monopoly on commercial TV in Mexico, which even went into heavily influencing the political landscape in the country. As a result, by 1985, and in preparation for the 1986 FIFA World Cup (in which Televisa was the host broadcaster), XEW-TV was renamed El Canal de las Estrellas, in reference to the station's line-up of actors, comedians and presenters. This was further reenforced with the launch of a image campaign song, sung by Lucía Méndez, in 1988.

After the death of Emilio Azcárraga Milmo in 1997, El Canal de las Estrellas suffered a massive restructuring of its programming. The biggest moment of the restructuring came in 1998, when 24 Horas, the Jacobo Zabludovsky-anchored newscast, long a propaganda mouthpiece of the Mexican political regime, was canceled. The station's brand identity was also replaced with a new logo created by Pablo Rovalo. After a period of ratings turmoil, viewership stabilized, but the channel had to contend now with a surgent XHDF, freshly privatized and bought under the auspicies of TV Azteca.

After years of decline, particularly after 2012, as accusations of political bias in favor of then-President Enrique Peña Nieto began to hamper the broadcaster's credibility, in 2016, the decision was made to relaunch entirely the station's branding and programming. On 22 August 2016, XEW-TV was renamed as Las Estrellas, and introduced many changes to its programming schedule, including shorter and snappier telenovelas and news programming, as well as dropping many long-running programming in favour of programming oriented to a younger audience.[2] The changes generated a big ratings decline;[3][4] as a result, by 2017, much of the new programming was canceled and the prime time telenovelas and news programming were relocated to pre-relaunch timeslots[5] and viewership stabilized, specially, during the COVID-19 pandemic.[6]

Las Estrellas Internacional

Las Estrellas is available as a pay television network in Europe and Australia as Las Estrellas Europa[7] and Las Estrellas Latinoamérica in Central and South America through Televisa Networks.[8] Both feeds differ from the Las Estrellas programming, usually broadcasting shows weeks behind their original broadcast.

In Canada, XEW-TDT and the Las Estrellas schedule is available in full on Rogers Cable (limited to the Greater Toronto Area) and Bell Fibe TV as an eligible foreign service.

Network logos

Programming

Weekday programming in the afternoon and prime time consists of telenovelas. Las Estrellas airs sports programming and sports specials like the Olympic Games and the FIFA World Cup. Morning and afternoon programming consists of news, sports, talk shows, and variety shows. Night time programming is filled with a news program and Univision-produced shows. Examples of shows produced by Las Estrellas are Recuerda y Gana, Hoy, El Juego de las Estrellas, and Cuéntamelo ya. The network also produces and airs the Premios TVyNovelas, sponsored by the Televisa-owned magazine of the same name and considered the highest honor in the domestic Mexican television industry.

Repeaters

The following is a list of all full-time Las Estrellas repeaters:

RF VC Callsign Location ERP Concessionaire
26 2 XHEBC-TDT Ensenada 38 kW Televimex
34 2 XHBM-TDT Mexicali 180 kW Televimex
22 19 XHUAA-TDT Tijuana 200 kW Televimex
27 2 XHSJT-TDT San José del Cabo
Cabo San Lucas
30 kW
27 kW[9]
Televimex
30 2 XHCBC-TDT Cd. Constitución 10 kW Televimex
26 2 XHGWT-TDT Guerrero Negro 30 kW Televimex
28 2 XHLPT-TDT La Paz 26 kW Televimex
34 2 XHCPA-TDT Campeche 28 kW Televimex
22 2 XHCDC-TDT Ciudad del Carmen 31 kW[10] Televimex
21 2 XHEFT-TDT Escárcega 18 kW Televimex
32 2 XHWVT-TDT Tonalá
Arriaga
20 kW
18 kW[11]
Televimex
34 2 XHCIC-TDT Cintalapa de Figueroa Televimex
23 2 XHCMZ-TDT Comitán de Dominguez 32 kW Televimex
32 2 XHHUC-TDT Huixtla 40 kW Televimex
32 2 XHOCC-TDT Ocosingo 39 kW Televimex
16 2 XHSCC-TDT San Cristobal de las Casas 30 kW Televimex
23 2 XHAA-TDT Tapachula 62 kW Televimex
29 2 XHTUA-TDT Tuxtla Gutiérrez 45 kW Televimex
28 2 XHVAC-TDT Venustiano Carranza 22 kW Televimex
26 2 XHVFC-TDT Villaflores 20 kW Televimex
36 2 XHCHC-TDT Cd. Camargo 24 kW Televimex
46 2 XHCCH-TDT Cd. Cuauhtémoc 26 kW Televimex
23 2 XHDEH-TDT Cd. Delicias 20 kW Televimex
33 2 XHBU-TDT Cd. Jiménez 11 kW Televimex
29 2 XEPM-TDT Cd. Juárez 50 kW Televimex
29 2 XHMAC-TDT Cd. Madera 14 kW Televimex
24 2 XHFI-TDT Chihuahua
Cd. Cuauhtémoc
47 kW
26 kW[12]
Televimex
26 2 XHHPT-TDT Hidalgo del Parral 24 kW Televimex
27 2 XHNCG-TDT Nuevo Casas Grandes 34 kW Televimex
15 2 XHOCH-TDT Ojinaga 23 kW Televimex
35 2 XHBVT-TDT San Buenaventura 25 kW Televimex
34 2 XHSAC-TDT Santa Barbara 23 kW Televimex
32 2 XEW-TDT Mexico City (Pico Tres Padres, Mexico) 270 kW Televimex
35 2 XHWDT-TDT Allende 40 kW Televimex
34 2 XHAMC-TDT Ciudad Acuña 50 kW Televimex
23 2 XHRDC-TDT Nueva Rosita 42 kW Televimex
35 2 XHMOT-TDT Monclova 50 kW Televimex
22 2 XHPAC-TDT Parras de la Fuente 62 kW Televimex
30 2 XHPNT-TDT Piedras Negras 43 kW Televimex
20[13] 2 XHO-TDT Torreón 150 kW Televimex
16 2 XHBZ-TDT Colima
Manzanillo
Cd. Guzmán, Jal.
54 kW
30 kW[14]
15 kW[15]
Televimex
23 2 XHTEC-TDT Tecomán/Armería 33 kW Televimex
21 2 XHDI-TDT Durango
Santiago Papasquiaro, Dgo.
94 kW Televimex
27 2 XHLGT-TDT León
Guanajuato
180 kW
20 kW[16]
Televimex
22 2 XHACZ-TDT Acapulco 15 kW Televimex
20 2 XHCK-TDT Chilpancingo 50 kW Televimex
26 2 XHIGG-TDT Iguala 43 kW Televimex
34 2 XHTGG-TDT Tecpán de Galeana 24 kW Televimex
27 2 XHIZG-TDT Ixtapa and Zihuatanejo 40 kW Televimex
34 2 XHTWH-TDT Tulancingo 45 kW Televimex
36 2 XHATJ-TDT Atotonilco El Alto 24 kW Televimex
32 2 XHANT-TDT Autlán de Navarro 43 kW Televimex
24 2 XHGA-TDT. Guadalajara Metropolitan Area 150 kW Televimex
25 2 XHLBU-TDT La Barca 22 kW Televimex
36 2 XHPVT-TDT Puerto Vallarta 33 kW Televimex
36 2 XHTM-TDT Altzomoni
Tejupilco de Hidalgo
Taxco, Gro.
Pachuca, Hgo. (RF 39)
Cuernavaca, Mor.
San Martín Texmelucan, Pue.
Tlaxcala, Tlax.
236 kW
20 kW[17]
21 kW[18]
8 kW[19]
45 kW[20]
20 kW[21]
30 kW[22]
Televimex
19 2 XHTOL-TDT Toluca/Jocotitlán 45 kW Televimex
25 2 XHAPN-TDT Apatzingán 47 kW Televimex
21 2 XHCHM-TDT Ciudad Hidalgo 14 kW Televimex
30 2 XHLBT-TDT Lazaro Cárdenas 25 kW Televimex
31 2 XHLRM-TDT Los Reyes 22 kW Televimex
16 2 XHKW-TDT Morelia 47.2 kW Jose Humberto y Loucille Martínez Morales
30 2 XHURT-TDT Cerro Burro, Mich. 338 kW Televimex
14 2 XHSAM-TDT Sahuayo de Morelos-Jiquilpan 20 kW Televimex
29 2 XHZMT-TDT Zamora 32 kW Televimex
36 2 XHZIM-TDT Zinapécuaro 30 kW Televimex
25 2 XHZMM-TDT Zitácuaro 10 kW Televimex
32 2 XHACN-TDT Acaponeta and Tecuala 15 kW Televimex
23 2 XHIMN-TDT Islas Marias 1.3 kW Televimex
18 2 XHSEN-TDT Santiago Ixcuintla 17 kW Televimex
28 2 XHTEN-TDT Tepic 55 kW Televimex
23 2 XHX-TDT Monterrey
Saltillo, Coah.
Sabinas Hidalgo
200 kW
45 kW[23]
4.8 kW
Televimex
31 2 XHHLO-TDT Huajuapan de León
Tehuacán, Pue.
76 kW
36 kW[24]
Televimex
21 2 XHPAO-TDT Cerro Palma Sola, Oax. 76 kW Televimex
23 2 XHMIO-TDT Miahuatlán de Porfirio Díaz 18 kW Televimex
29 2 XHBN-TDT Oaxaca 97 kW Televimex
32 2 XHPNO-TDT Pinotepa Nacional 46 kW Televimex
36 2 XHPAT-TDT Puerto Ángel 24 kW Televimex
31 2 XHPET-TDT Puerto Escondido 21 kW Televimex
20 2 XHZAP-TDT Zacatlán 20 kW Televimex
32 2 XHZ-TDT Querétaro (Cerro El Zamorano)
Cerro El Cimatario
Guanajuato, Gto.
Irapuato-Celaya, Gto.
San Miguel de Allende, Gto.
180 kW
10 kW
20 kW
50 kW
65 kW
Televimex
21 2 XHCCN-TDT Cancún
Playa del Carmen
60 kW
20 kW[25]
Televimex
27 2 XHCHF-TDT Chetumal 28 kW Televimex
30 2 XHCOQ-TDT Cozumel 60 kW Televimex
30 2 XHCDV-TDT Ciudad Valles 18 kW Televimex
29 2 XHMTS-TDT Matehuala 27 kW Televimex
31 2 XHSLA-TDT San Luis Potosí 210 kW Televimex
29 2 XHTAT-TDT Tamazunchale 40 kW Televimex
23 2 XHBT-TDT Culiacán 155 kW Televimex
25
30
2 XHBS-TDT Los Mochis
Cd. Obregón, Son.(RF 30)[26]
110 kW
200 kW
Televimex
25 2 XHOW-TDT Mazatlán 118 kW Televimex
17 2 XHAPT-TDT Agua Prieta 25 kW Televimex
35 2 XHSVT-TDT Caborca 37 kW Televimex
34 2 XHCNS-TDT Cananea 32 kW Televimex
20 2 XHGST-TDT Guaymas 46 kW Televimex
23 2 XHHES-TDT Hermosillo 100 kW Televimex
21 2 XHMST-TDT Magdalena de Kino 24 kW Televimex
27 2 XHBF-TDT Navojoa 65 kW Televisora de Navojoa
17 2 XHNOS-TDT Nogales 35 kW Televimex
22 2 XHPDT-TDT Puerto Peñasco 32 kW Televimex
32 2 XHLRT-TDT San Luis Río Colorado 55 kW Televimex
27 2 XHFRT-TDT Frontera 18 kW Televimex
31 2 XHUBT-TDT La Venta 3 kW Televimex
30 2 XHTET-TDT Tenosique
Palenque, Chis.
28 kW Televimex
32 2 XHVIZ-TDT Villahermosa 125 kW Televimex
34 2 XHMBT-TDT Ciudad Mante 27 kW Televimex
31 2 XHTK-TDT Ciudad Victoria 80 kW Televimex
30 2 XHLUT-TDT La Rosita-Villagrán 35 kW Televimex
29 2 XHLAR-TDT Nuevo Laredo 200 kW Televimex
19 9 XERV-TDT Reynosa 300 kW Televisora de Occidente
28 2 XHTAM-TDT Matamoros 265 kW Televimex
25 2 XHSFT-TDT San Fernando 15 kW Televimex
32 2 XHSZT-TDT Soto la Marina 20 kW Televimex
17 2 XHGO-TDT Tampico 180 kW Televimex
18 2 XHCRT-TDT Cerro Azul 28 kW Televimex
24 2 XHCV-TDT Coatzacoalcos 60 kW Televimex
24 2 XHFM-TDT Veracruz Televisora de Occidente
17 2 XHAH-TDT Las Lajas
Nogales
Orizaba
430 kW
25 kW[27]
60 kW[28]
Televimex
35 2 XHATV-TDT San Andrés Tuxtla, Ver. 22 kW Televimex
30 2 XHTP-TDT Mérida 125 kW Televisora Peninsular
32 2 XHVTT-TDT Valladolid
Tizimín
60 kW
28 kW[29]
Televimex
22 2 XHJZT-TDT Jalpa 25 kW Televimex
23 2 XHNOZ-TDT Nochistlan 32 kW Televimex
18 2 XHSOZ-TDT Sombrerete 32 kW Televimex
25 2 XHTLZ-TDT Tlaltenango
Calvillo, Ags.
22 kW
17 kW[30]
Televimex
22 2 XHVAZ-TDT Valparaiso 22 kW Televimex
16 2 XHBD-TDT Zacatecas
Aguascalientes, Ags.
130 kW
10 kW[31]
Televimex

References

  1. ^ Hollywood Reporter: Univision books more Televisa Original Content
  2. ^ TIM, Televisa. "El Canal de las Estrellas es ahora... Las Estrellas". Televisa (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021.
  3. ^ "Crisis de rating en Televisa provoca salida de 'Esta Noche con Arath"". www.proceso.com.mx (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021.
  4. ^ "Crisis de ratings en noticieros y telenovelas de Televisa acelera cambios en contenidos y programación". www.proceso.com.mx (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021.
  5. ^ "López Dóriga, Brozo, Adela Micha... Recortes y cancelaciones, el "segundo gran cambio" de Televisa - Amedi". www.amedi.org.mx (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021.
  6. ^ "Más audiencia: la pandemia reanima a las telenovelas mexicanas | Gente | Entretenimiento | El Universo". www.eluniverso.com (in Spanish). Retrieved 2021.
  7. ^ Canal de las Estrellas Europa: Europe and Australia coverage Archived 29 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  8. ^ Canal de las Estrellas Latinoamerica: Latin America coverage Archived 29 September 2011 at the Wayback Machine
  9. ^ RPC: Shadow XHSJT Cabo San Lucas
  10. ^ RPC: Authorization for XHCDC-TDT
  11. ^ RPC: Shadow XHWVT Arriaga, Chis.
  12. ^ RPC: Shadow XHCHZ Cd. Cuauhtémoc
  13. ^ RPC: Change in Frequency XHO-TDT, from 46 to 20
  14. ^ RPC: Shadow XHBZ Manzanillo[permanent dead link]
  15. ^ RPC: Shadow XHBZ Cd. Guzmán
  16. ^ RPC: Shadow XHLGT-TDT Guanajuato
  17. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM Tejupilco
  18. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM Taxco
  19. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM Pachuca
  20. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM Cuernavaca
  21. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM San Martín Texmelucan
  22. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTM Tlaxcala
  23. ^ RPC: Shadow XHX
  24. ^ RPC: Shadow XHHLO Tehuacán, Pue.
  25. ^ RPC: Shadow XHCCN Playa del Carmen
  26. ^ RPC: XHBS-TDT, Ciudad Obregón, Sonora
  27. ^ RPC: Shadow XHAH Nogales
  28. ^ RPC: Shadow XHAH Orizaba[permanent dead link]
  29. ^ RPC: Shadow XHVTT Tizimín, Yuc.
  30. ^ RPC: Shadow XHTLZ Calvillo - RF 24
  31. ^ RPC: Shadow XHBD Aguascalientes

External links


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