Iodous Acid
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Iodous Acid
Iodite
Iodite formula.jpg
Names
IUPAC name
iodite
Systematic IUPAC name
dioxidoiodate(1-)
Identifiers
  • 20499-55-2
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/HIO2/c2-1-3/h(H,2,3)/p-1
  • [O-][I+][O-]
Properties
Molar mass 58.90327 gm mol-1
Conjugate acid Iodous acid
Related compounds
Other anions
Chlorite
Bromite
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

The Iodite ion, or iodine dioxide anion, is the halite with the chemical formula . Within the ion the Iodine exists in the oxidation state of +3.

Iodite anion

Iodites (including Iodous acid) are highly unstable and have been observed[1] but never isolated.[2] They will rapidly disproportionate to molecular Iodine and Iodates.[3] However, they have been detected as intermediates in the conversion between iodide and iodate.[4][5]

Iodous acid

Iodous acid
Iodige Saeure.png
Ball-and-stick model of iodous acid
Space-filling model of iodous acid
Names
IUPAC name
iodous acid
Identifiers
  • 12134-99-5
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/HIO2/c2-1-3/h(H,2,3)
  • O[I+][O-]
Properties
HIO2
Molar mass 159.911
Conjugate base Iodite
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Iodous acid is acid form of the iodite ion, with the formula HIO2.

Other oxyanions

Iodine can assume oxidation states of -1, +1, +3, +5, or +7. A number of neutral iodine oxides are also known.

Iodine oxidation state -1 +1 +3 +5 +7
Name Iodide Hypoiodite Iodite Iodate periodate
Formula I- IO- or

References

  1. ^ Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-08-037941-8.
  2. ^ Ropp, R.C. (2013). Encyclopedia of the alkaline earth compounds. Oxford: Elsevier Science. p. 96. ISBN 978-0444595539.
  3. ^ Greenwood, Norman N.; Earnshaw, Alan (1997). Chemistry of the Elements (2nd ed.). Butterworth-Heinemann. ISBN 978-0-08-037941-8.
  4. ^ Gupta, Yugul Kishore; Sharma, Devendra Nath (August 1971). "Kinetics and mechanism of the reduction of iodate to iodite by bromide in the presence of phenol". The Journal of Physical Chemistry. 75 (16): 2516-2522. doi:10.1021/j100685a018.
  5. ^ Gilles, Mary K.; Polak, Mark L.; Lineberger, W. C. (1992). "Photoelectron spectroscopy of the halogen oxide anions FO-, ClO-, BrO-, IO-, OClO-, and OIO-". The Journal of Chemical Physics. 96 (11): 8012. Bibcode:1992JChPh..96.8012G. doi:10.1063/1.462352.



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