Hwang Sun-hong
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Hwang Sun-hong

Hwang Sun-hong
FC    ? 2.23 minutes Scene.jpg
Hwang in 2016
Personal information
Full name Hwang Sun-hong
Date of birth (1968-07-14) 14 July 1968 (age 53)
Place of birth Yesan, Chungnam, South Korea
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Position(s) Striker
Youth career
Seoul Yongmoon Middle School
Seoul Yongmoon High School
College career
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1987-1990 Konkuk University
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1991-1992 Bayer Leverkusen II 10[a] (10)
1992-1993 Wuppertaler SV 9 (3)
1993-1998 Pohang Steelers 52 (26)
1998-1999 Cerezo Osaka 36 (30)
2000 Suwon Samsung Bluewings 0 (0)
2000 -> Kashiwa Reysol (loan) 0 (0)
2000-2002 Kashiwa Reysol 34 (12)
2002 Jeonnam Dragons 0 (0)
Total 141 (81)
National team
1996 South Korea U23 (WC) 4 (0)
1988-2002 South Korea 103 (50)
Teams managed
2008-2010 Busan IPark
2011-2015 Pohang Steelers
2016-2018 FC Seoul
2019 Yanbian Funde
2020 Daejeon Hana Citizen
Honours
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only
Hwang Sun-hong
Hangul
Hanja
Revised RomanizationHwang Seon-hong
McCune-ReischauerHwang S?n-hong

Hwang Sun-hong (born 14 July 1968) is a South Korean former football player and current manager. He was the most notable South Korean striker in the 1990s and early 2000s.

Club career

After graduating from University, Hwang boycotted the draft system of the K League and left for Germany to study football.[1] In the summer of 1991 he joined the reserve team of Bayer Leverkusen, and scored 10 goals with 10 appearances during the first half of the season in the Oberliga Nordrhein, the fourth division of Germany.[2] He joined 2. Bundesliga side Wuppertaler SV next year, but he appeared only nine games for a season because the cruciate ligament of his knee was ruptured.[3]

Returning to South Korea in June 1993, he was drafted by the newly formed club Wansan Puma, formerly the Chonbuk Buffalo, and was traded to Pohang Steelworks for eight players.[4] In the 1995 K League, he spent his heyday by recording 11 goals and six assists with 24 appearances including a record, which he set by scoring in eight consecutive matches, but his team finished runners-up.[5] He won two Asian Club Championships with Pohang, but he couldn't won a K League title.[6]

He also spent much of his career in the Japanese J1 League and enjoyed his most prolific season with Cerezo Osaka. He scored 24 goals in 25 matches of the 1999 J1 League, becoming the first South Korean footballer who won the top scorer award of a foreign league.[7] He was also nominated for the Asian Footballer of the Year in that year.[8] In late 2003, having finally retired, Hwang has now turned his attention to coaching.

International career

As an unknown player who played for a university, Hwang was suddenly selected for the South Korea squad for the 1988 AFC Asian Cup by the manager Lee Hoe-taik, who kept an eye on him since he became a high school player.[9] He scored two goals, each of which were scored against Japan and Iran, in the tournament. Following outstanding performances, which scored seven goals in qualifying campaign, he was included in the South Korea squad for the 1990 FIFA World Cup, but his plays weren't in sync with colleagues' teamwork in the competition, and couldn't prevent three losses of team in the group stage.[10]

He showed poor performance by scoring only one goal in qualifiers of the 1994 FIFA World Cup, but his form was regained in the friendly matches just before the World Cup.[11] However, he was injured the left knee in the last friendly against Honduras before the tournament, worrying his manager Kim Ho.[12] He had two chances to score in the first game against Spain, but he missed both,[13] and apologized to his teammates after the game.[14] However, his poor performance was continued by missing several opportunities to score against Bolivia.[15] South Korea met the defending champions Germany in the last group match after two draws, and he pulled one back when Germany was taking a 3-0 lead, but the game finished 3-2. He was severely blamed for his inexact shots against Bolivia by South Korean fans, and suffered from social anxiety disorder after South Korea was eliminated in the group stage.[3]

In contrast with fans' criticism, Hwang was consistently chosen as a striker of the national team by managers. At the 1994 Asian Games, he became the top scorer of the tournament by scoring 11 goals in five games including eight goals against Nepal.[16] He also played for the South Korea under-23 squad as an overage player for the 1996 Summer Olympics, and contributed to a victory by winning a crucial penalty kick, finished as the winning goal, in the first game against Ghana,[17] but he quit the tournament due to his injury during the first half of the second game.[18] He looked forward to the 1998 FIFA World Cup to make up for his failure in the 1994 World Cup, but he was injured by a Chinese goalkeeper Jiang Jin in a friendly against China just before the World Cup,[19] and was disappointed to be excluded from the line-up of the tournament.[3] At the 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup, South Korea was eliminated in the group stage, although they won two matches against Mexico and Australia, but he won the Bronze Shoe award by scoring two goals which led two victories.[20]

Hwang was still an important part of South Korea even at the 2002 FIFA World Cup, although he approached his mid-30s. By scoring the winning goal in the first group match against Poland, he helped South Korea to achieve their first ever victory in the FIFA World Cup.[21] He was injured the head during the second match against United States, but he continued to play after bandaging around his head. He won a penalty kick during the game, but his teammate missed it. He came forward as the first kicker of South Korea in the penalty shoot-out of the quarter-finals against Spain, and helped the team to reach the semi-finals by succeeding the shot. He ended his international career after the 2002 World Cup, and had made 103 appearances and 50 goals for South Korea alongside six operations, due to many injuries, during his career.[22][3]

Managerial career

In 2005, Hwang was appointed as assistant coach of Jeonnam Dragons and started his coaching career. He received Best Coach Award from the 2006 Korean FA Cup.[23] On 4 December 2007, he signed a three-year contract with Busan IPark and became manager of Busan.

On 9 November 2010, he returned to his former team Pohang Steelers as manager. In first coaching year at the Pohang, he guided the team to the second place in the regular season. A sound knowledge of coaching, player training, and club training analysis and observation - as a coach, the Pohang Steelers became the FA Cup champions in 2012. The success of the organization under the careful, meticulous, and successful guidance of Hwang continued as the Pohang defended their FA Cup title for another year in 2013 and became K League 1 champions in that year. He received the K League Manager of the Year Award.

On 21 June 2016, he was appointed as manager of FC Seoul. On 30 April 2018, he resigned as Seoul manager with responsibility for poor performance.[24][25] On 14 December 2018, Hwang was appointed as manager of Yanbian Funde. However, he left the club after Yanbian Funde was disqualified for the 2019 China League One due to owing taxes in February 2019.[26][27]

Career statistics

Club

Club Season League National Cup League Cup Continental Total
Division Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Bayer Leverkusen II 1991-92 Oberliga Nordrhein 10[a] 10 -- -- -- 10 10
Wuppertaler SV 1992-93 2. Bundesliga 9 3 -- -- 9 3
Pohang Steelers 1993 K League 0 0 -- 1 0 -- 1 0
1994 K League 14 5 -- 0 0 -- 14 5
1995 K League 24 11 -- 2 0 -- 26 11
1996 K League 13 10 0 0 5 3 18 13
1997 K League 0 0 1 0 1 0 2 0
1998 K League 1 0 0 0 2 2 3 2
Total 52 26 1 0 11 5 64 31
Cerezo Osaka 1998 J1 League 11 6 0 0 0 0 -- 11 6
1999 J1 League 25 24 0 0 2 3 -- 27 27
Total 36 30 0 0 2 3 -- 38 33
Suwon Samsung Bluewings 2000 K League 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0
Kashiwa Reysol 2000 J1 League 6 1 0 0 1 0 -- 7 1
2001 J1 League 21 10 0 0 4 0 -- 25 10
2002 J1 League 7 1 0 0 0 0 -- 7 1
Total 34 12 0 0 5 0 -- 39 12
Jeonnam Dragons 2002 K League 0 0 0 0 0 0 -- 0 0
Career total 141 81 1 0 19 8 161 89
  1. ^ a b First-half record was known by a South Korean newspaper JoongAng Ilbo.[2]

International

Source:[28][22]

National team Year Apps Goals
South Korea U23 1996 4 0
South Korea
1988 5 2
1989 12 8
1990 17 6
1991 0 0
1992 0 0
1993 6 1
1994 17 16
1995 3 1
1996 10 8
1997 0 0
1998 8 3
1999 5 0
2000 2 0
2001 7 2
2002 11 3
Total 103 50
Career total 107 50

International goals

Results list South Korea's goal tally first.
Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
6 December 1988 Doha, Qatar  Japan 1 goal 2-0 1988 AFC Asian Cup
11 December 1988 Doha, Qatar  Iran 1 goal 3-0 1988 AFC Asian Cup
23 May 1989 Seoul, South Korea  Singapore 2 goals 3-0 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification
27 May 1989 Seoul, South Korea  Malaysia 2 goals 3-0 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification
5 June 1989 Singapore  Malaysia 1 goal 3-0 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification
14 August 1989 Los Angeles, USA  United States 1 goal 2-1 1989 Marlboro Cup
16 October 1989 Singapore  North Korea 1 goal 1-0 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification
25 October 1989 Singapore  Saudi Arabia 1 goal 2-0 1990 FIFA World Cup qualification
4 February 1990 Ta'Qali, Malta  Norway 1 goal 2-3 Friendly match
28 July 1990 Beijing, China  Japan 1 goal 2-0 1990 Dynasty Cup
25 September 1990 Beijing, China  Pakistan 3 goals 7-0 1990 Asian Games
23 October 1990 Seoul, South Korea  North Korea 1 goal 1-0 Friendly match
28 October 1993 Doha, Qatar  North Korea 1 goal 3-0 1994 FIFA World Cup qualification
26 February 1994 Los Angeles, USA  Colombia 1 goal 2-2 Friendly match
4 May 1994 Changwon, South Korea  Cameroon 1 goal 2-1 Friendly match
11 June 1994 Duncanville, USA  Honduras 1 goal 3-0 Friendly match
27 June 1994 Dallas, USA  Germany 1 goal 2-3 1994 FIFA World Cup
13 September 1994 Seoul, South Korea  Ukraine 1 goal 2-0 Friendly match
1 October 1994 Hiroshima, Japan    Nepal 8 goals 11-0 1994 Asian Games
5 October 1994 Hiroshima, Japan  Oman 1 goal 2-1 1994 Asian Games
11 October 1994 Hiroshima, Japan  Japan 2 goals 3-2 1994 Asian Games
30 October 1995 Seoul, South Korea  Saudi Arabia 1 goal 1-1 Friendly match
19 March 1996 Dubai, UAE  United Arab Emirates 1 goal 2-3 1996 Dubai Tournament
30 April 1996 Tel Aviv, Israel  Israel 2 goals 5-4 Friendly match
23 November 1996 Suwon, South Korea  Colombia 2 goals 4-1 Friendly match
4 December 1996 Abu Dhabi, UAE  United Arab Emirates 1 goal 1-1 1996 AFC Asian Cup
7 December 1996 Abu Dhabi, UAE  Indonesia 2 goals 4-2 1996 AFC Asian Cup
1 April 1998 Seoul, South Korea  Japan 1 goal 2-1 Friendly match
22 April 1998 Belgrade, FR Yugoslavia  FR Yugoslavia 1 goal 1-3 Friendly match
27 May 1998 Seoul, South Korea  Czech Republic 1 goal 2-2 Friendly match
1 June 2001 Ulsan, South Korea  Mexico 1 goal 2-1 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup
3 June 2001 Suwon, South Korea  Australia 1 goal 1-0 2001 FIFA Confederations Cup
20 March 2002 Cartagena, Spain  Finland 2 goals 2-0 Friendly match
4 June 2002 Busan, South Korea  Poland 1 goal 2-0 2002 FIFA World Cup

Honours

Player

Pohang Steelers

South Korea

Individual

Manager

Busan IPark

Pohang Steelers

FC Seoul

Individual

See also

References

  1. ^ . Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 4 January 1991. Retrieved 2020.
  2. ^ a b ? , , (in Korean). JoongAng Ilbo. 21 December 1991. Retrieved 2020.
  3. ^ a b c d [ ] (1)' '? (in Korean). JoongAng Ilbo. 7 December 2016. Retrieved 2020.
  4. ^ ? ? ?. Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 16 January 1993. Retrieved 2020.
  5. ^ ? 8 ? . Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 15 October 1995. Retrieved 2020.
  6. ^ "Asian Champions' Cup". RSSSF. 25 March 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  7. ^ [ (1)] "14? , ? " (in Korean). Sports Hanguk. 14 February 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  8. ^ Pierrend, José; Garin, Erik (5 February 2020). "Asian Player of the Year". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ [] ' ' ? '?2? ' (in Korean). JoongAng Ilbo. 29 January 2015. Retrieved 2020.
  10. ^ ? ? ? (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 22 June 1990. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ "?". Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 13 May 1994. Retrieved 2020.
  12. ^ ? ? "? ". Naver.com (in Korean). The Dong-A Ilbo. 14 June 1994. Retrieved 2020.
  13. ^ " " - ? 2?. Naver.com (in Korean). The Dong-A Ilbo. 19 June 1994. Retrieved 2020.
  14. ^ "? ". Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 21 June 1994. Retrieved 2020.
  15. ^ Park, Jong-hwan (25 June 1994). . Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. Retrieved 2020.
  16. ^ a b "Asian Games 1994 (Hiroshima, Japan)". RSSSF. 17 January 2012.
  17. ^ ? 48 ? . Naver.com (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. 23 July 1996. Retrieved 2020.
  18. ^ ?"" -- ? C?2...? . Naver.com (in Korean). The Dong-A Ilbo. 25 July 1996. Retrieved 2020.
  19. ^ ? #1. YouTube.com (in Korean). KFATV. 21 March 2017.
  20. ^ "HWANG Sun Hong". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  21. ^ "KOREA REPUBLIC 2 : 0 POLAND". Yahoo!. 2002 FIFA World Cup (TM). 4 June 2002. Archived from the original on 10 February 2003. Retrieved 2019.
  22. ^ a b HWANG Sunhong FW (in Korean). KFA. Retrieved 2019.
  23. ^ 9 FA?''. Naver.com (in Korean). Sports Kyunghyang. 3 December 2006. Retrieved 2020.
  24. ^ "FC Seoul coach leaves for China, replaced by ex-teammate". Yonhap. 21 June 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  25. ^ [] FC, " , " (in Korean). Sportalkorea. 30 April 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  26. ^ : (in Chinese). Dongqiudi. 14 December 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  27. ^ 2019 (in Chinese). CFA. 26 February 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  28. ^ Lee, Seung-soo (24 November 2002). "Hwang Seon-Hong - Century of International Appearances". RSSSF. Retrieved 2012.
  29. ^ a b c d e f Lee, Seung-soo; Trevena, Mark (8 April 2020). "South Korea - List of Cup Winners". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  30. ^ Fujioka, Atsushi; Halchuk, Stephen; Stokkermans, Karel (25 March 2020). "Asian Champions' Cup". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  31. ^ "2002 FIFA World Cup Korea/Japan (TM) - Matches - Korea Republic-Turkey". FIFA. Archived from the original on 8 April 2015. Retrieved 2020.
  32. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (6 September 2018). "Asian Games". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  33. ^ Stokkermans, Karel (7 February 2019). "Asian Nations Cup". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  34. ^ Bobrowsky, Josef; Stokkermans, Karel (20 June 2007). "Dynasty Cup". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  35. ^ 88MVP 11. Naver.com (in Korean). Kyunghyang. 25 January 1989. Retrieved 2020.
  36. ^ ? MVP (in Korean). The Dong-A Ilbo. 24 November 1995.
  37. ^ a b J MVP (in Japanese). ULTRAZONE. 5 December 2017.
  38. ^ "FIFA Confederations Cup Korea/Japan 2001 Awards". FIFA.
  39. ^ 11 (in Korean). YTN. 31 May 2013.
  40. ^ a b Lee, Seung-soo; Schöggl, Hans; Trevena, Mark (13 May 2020). "South Korea - List of Champions". RSSSF. Retrieved 2020.
  41. ^ [] ,'FA CUP ? ' (in Korean). OSEN. 20 October 2012.
  42. ^ '' , K (in Korean). Sportalkorea. 3 December 2013.
  43. ^ 2016? K MVP , ? (in Korean). Sports Chosun. 8 November 2016.

External links


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