Herbert Kalmus
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Herbert Kalmus
Herbert Kalmus
Herbert Kalmus.jpg
Born
Herbert Thomas Kalmus

(1881-11-09)November 9, 1881
DiedJuly 11, 1963(1963-07-11) (aged 81)
OccupationScientist
Engineer
Known forCo-founder of Technicolor
Developing color motion picture film processes

Herbert Thomas Kalmus (November 9, 1881 - July 11, 1963)[1][2][3] was an American scientist and engineer who played a significant role in developing color motion picture film. Kalmus was the co-founder and president of the Technicolor Motion Picture Corporation.[4][5]

Biography

Kalmus received a bachelor's degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1904; the "Tech" in Technicolor is partly a tribute to that school.[] He earned his doctorate at the University of Zurich and was a research associate at MIT from 1908 to 1910 before teaching physics, electrochemistry and metallurgy at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. He was also a director of research for the Canadian government's electro-chemical laboratory.[6]

On July 23, 1902, Kalmus married Natalie (née Dunfee or Dunphy) Kalmus, who became the color coordinator for nearly every live-action Technicolor feature released from 1934 to 1949. Although they divorced in 1922 after twenty years of marriage, they continued to live together, appearing as husband and wife, until 1944.[7] He then married Eleanore King in 1949.[8][6]

In 1912, Kalmus and fellow MIT graduate Daniel Comstock formed Kalmus, Comstock, and Wescott, an industrial research and development firm, with mechanic W. Burton Wescott, who left the company in 1921. When the firm was hired to analyze an inventor's flicker-free motion picture system, they became intrigued with the art and science of filmmaking, particularly color motion picture processes, leading to the incorporation of Technicolor in 1915. Most of Technicolor's early patents were taken out by Comstock and Wescott, while Kalmus served primarily as the company's president and chief executive officer.[]

In 1938, Kalmus received the Progress Medal from the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. In 1952, he received their Samuel L. Warner memorial award, "for Technicolor's perfection of the imbibition process for 16mm color prints and for the techniques of making separate sound negatives for mass production by the 35mm/32mm method for excellence of 16mm sound",[9] however it was "accepted on his behalf by Mr. Wadsworth Pohl, his associate."[10] He was made an honorary life member of the SMPTE. He also received an award from the US Office of Scientific Research and Development.[6]

He was a director at Stanford Research Institute.[6]

He had two daughters.[6] Kalmus' god-daughter (and later step-daughter), Cammie King, played the part of Bonnie Blue Butler in the film Gone With the Wind (1939). The autobiography of Herbert Kalmus, Mr. Technicolor (ISBN 1882127315), was published in 1993.

Legacy

References

  1. ^ U.S. Census, 1910, State of Massachusetts, County of Suffolk, enumeration district 1647, p. 8-B, family 180.
  2. ^ Ancestry.com. Social Security Death Index [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2009.
  3. ^ Ancestry.com. California Death Index, 1940-1997 [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: The Generations Network, Inc., 2000.
  4. ^ "Obituary: Herbert T. Kalmus". Physics Today. 16 (9): 107. September 1963. doi:10.1063/1.3051117. Archived from the original on 2013-09-21.
  5. ^ March 1964 Correction to the Sept. 1963 obituary for Herbert T. Kalmus in Physics Today
  6. ^ a b c d e "Kalmus, Dead at 81, Founder of And 48 Years With, Technicolor Corp". Variety. July 17, 1963. p. 7.
  7. ^ Kalmus v. Kalmus, 1950.
  8. ^ "Film Magnate Weds". The New York Times. September 7, 1949. p. 37.
  9. ^ "The Samuel L. Warner Memorial Medal Award Recipients | Society of Motion Picture & Television Engineers". www.smpte.org. Retrieved 2020. For Technicolor's perfection of the imbibition process for 16mm color prints and for the techniques of making separate sound negatives for mass production by the 35mm/32mm method for excellence of 16mm sound.
  10. ^ "Awards". Journal of the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers. 59 (6): 535-540. December 1952. doi:10.5594/J01162. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ Setterlund, Christopher (May 2017). "The Changing Shape of the Cape & Islands: Lewis Bay, from Hyannis Port to Kalmus Beach & Great Island". Cape Cod Life. Retrieved 2021.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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