GlobalSecurity.org
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GlobalSecurity.org

GlobalSecurity.org is a nonpartisan,[1] independent,[2][3] nonprofit organization[4] that serves as a think tank,[5][6] research and consultancy group,[7][8][9][10] and website.

Focus

It is focused on national and international security issues;[11] military analysis, systems, and strategies;[9][12] intelligence matters;[13][14] and space policy analysis.[15][16]

History

It was founded in December 2000 by John Pike, who had previously worked since 1983[17] with the Federation of American Scientists, where he directed the space policy, cyberstrategy, military analysis, nuclear resource, and intelligence resource projects.[4] GlobalSecurity.org is headquartered in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area in Alexandria, Virginia,[18][19] and John Pike is its director.[20]

The website's target audience includes journalists, policy-makers, scholars, political scientists, military and defense personnel, and the public.[21][19] It supplies background information and developing news stories,[22] providing online analysis and articles that analyze what are sometimes little-discussed topics[19] in categories that include WMDs, military and defense, security and cybersecurity, intelligence, and space technology.[23][24][25] It also disseminates primary documentation and other original materials,[19] provides detailed, high-resolution satellite images and video footage from war zones,[26][27] and provides definitions of widely used terms for the public.[28] The organization also serves as a defense, military, foreign policy, and national-security watchdog group.[27][29][30][31][32][33]

In part it seeks to find new approaches to international security, and promotes achieving cooperative international security and preventing nuclear proliferation.[19][24][34] To this end it seeks to improve intelligence-community capabilities to respond to new threats and to prevent the need for military action, while at the same time enhancing the effectiveness of military forces when needed.[24]

GlobalSecurity.org was listed in the War Intelligence category of Forbes' now-defunct "Best of the Web" directory from 2001 onward; the directory cited its "Depth of military information", and noted its "collection of satellite images and video footage from the war zone".[26] In his 2004 book Plan of Attack, about the behind-the-scenes decision-making that led the Bush administration to invade Iraq, Bob Woodward called the website "an invaluable resource on military, intelligence and national security matters".[35]

References

  1. ^ O'Rourke, Ciara (November 15, 2010). "Sen. John Cornyn says that Fort Hood is the largest military installation in the world". PolitiFact. Archived from the original on April 28, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  2. ^ Bender, Bryan (March 3, 2013). "Defense cut damage viewed as overblown". Boston Globe. Archived from the original on December 25, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  3. ^ Defence Journal, Volume 8, Issues 8-10. 2005. p. 19. Archived from the original on 2020-05-16. Retrieved .
  4. ^ a b Yester, Katherine (November 18, 2009). "Expert Sitings: John E. Pike". Foreign Policy. Archived from the original on May 6, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  5. ^ "Enemy at the gates". The Economist. November 19, 2015. Archived from the original on December 28, 2016. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ Tsuruoka, Doug (May 18, 2017). "Was Trump's NSC aide sidelined for being too hardline?". Asia Times. Retrieved 2018.
  7. ^ "Splashing, and clashing, in murky waters". The Economist. August 20, 2009. Archived from the original on April 12, 2016. Retrieved 2018.
  8. ^ Leary, Warren E. (September 20, 2005). "NASA Planning Return to Moon Within 13 Years". New York Times. Archived from the original on December 25, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  9. ^ a b Buncombe, Andrew (July 19, 2017). "Trump 'ends programme to arm anti-Assad rebels' in move sought by Russia". The Independent. Archived from the original on September 20, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  10. ^ Cowen, Tyler (November 18, 2007). "What Does Iraq Cost? Even More Than You Think". Washington Post. Archived from the original on May 12, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  11. ^ Sherman, Amy (July 20, 2016). "Donald Trump wrongly blames Hillary Clinton for creation of ISIS". PolitiFact. Archived from the original on May 15, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  12. ^ Hennigan, W.J.; Vartabedian, Ralph (May 30, 2017). "Upgrading U.S. nuclear missiles, as Russia and China modernize, would cost $85 billion. Is it time to quit the ICBM race?". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on April 25, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  13. ^ Gladstone, Rick (May 31, 2017). "Iran Drops Plan to Send Human Into Space, Citing Cost". New York Times. Archived from the original on June 1, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  14. ^ Broder, Jonathan (February 5, 2016). "Will Obama Bonb ISIS In Libya?". Newsweek. Archived from the original on May 7, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  15. ^ "Satellite spotters glimpse secrets, and tell them". CNET. February 12, 2008. Archived from the original on December 25, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  16. ^ Sacknoff, Scott (2004). North American Space Directory. Space Publications. p. 258. Archived from the original on 2021-02-07. Retrieved .
  17. ^ Aftergood, Steven (November-December 2000). "Pike Departs to Found New Organization". Journal of the Federation of American Scientists. 53 (6). Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved 2018.
  18. ^ Wayne, Leslie (February 5, 2006). "A Bold Plan to Go Where Men Have Gone Before". New York Times. Archived from the original on February 4, 2016. Retrieved 2018.
  19. ^ a b c d e Watson, Cynthia Ann (2002). U.S. National Security: A Reference Handbook. ABC-CLIO. p. 231. Archived from the original on 2020-05-14. Retrieved .
  20. ^ Sherwell, Philip (June 25, 2011). "US military leaders fear Afghanistan withdrawal will increase soldier deaths". The Telegraph. Archived from the original on December 25, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  21. ^ "Libraries: Political Science: International Politics". University of St. Thomas. Archived from the original on May 15, 2020. Retrieved 2018.
  22. ^ "Research Guides: Intelligence and Counter-Intelligence: News and Information Portals". University of Southern California. Archived from the original on March 25, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  23. ^ "Site Map". GlobalSecurity.org. Archived from the original on June 5, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  24. ^ a b c Burden, Paul R. (2010). A Subject Guide to Quality Web Sites. Scarecrow Press. p. 749.
  25. ^ Netzley, Patricia D. (2007). Terrorism. Greenhaven Press. p. 347. Archived from the original on 2020-05-13. Retrieved .
  26. ^ a b "Best of the Web: Web Site Reviews: GlobalSecurity.org". Forbes.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2011.
  27. ^ a b Umansky, Eric (September 22, 2002). "Image Problems; A Place to Find Out for Yourself About the War". New York Times. Archived from the original on December 26, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  28. ^ Watson, Cynthia Ann (2008). Nation-building and Stability Operations: A Reference Handbook. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 134. Archived from the original on 2020-05-16. Retrieved .
  29. ^ Gerstein, Josh (October 15, 2001). "Military Secrets Posted on Internet". ABC News. Archived from the original on May 16, 2020. Retrieved 2018.
  30. ^ Foley, Michael S.; O'Malley, Brendan P. (2008). Home Fronts: A Wartime America Reader. New Press. p. 574. Archived from the original on 2021-02-07. Retrieved .
  31. ^ Giles, Bob (December 15, 2002). "The Vital Role of the Press in a Time of National Crisis". Nieman Reports. 56 (4). Archived from the original on January 13, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  32. ^ Chatterjee, Pratap (June 9, 2004). "Controversial Commando Wins Iraq Contract". CorpWatch. Archived from the original on July 22, 2019. Retrieved 2018.
  33. ^ Scheeres, Julia (October 25, 2001). "Suppression Stifles Some Sites". Wired. Archived from the original on May 14, 2020. Retrieved 2018.
  34. ^ Hunt, Kimberly N., ed. (2004). Encyclopedia of Associations, Volume 1: National Organizations of the U.S. (41st ed.). Thomson Gale. p. 1899. Archived from the original on 2020-05-16. Retrieved .
  35. ^ Woodward, Bob (2004). Plan of Attack. Simon and Schuster. p. 446.

External links


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