Evenk Autonomous Okrug
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Evenk Autonomous Okrug
Evenk Autonomous Okrug
A?
Other transcription(s)
 o Evenk
Coat of arms of Evenk Autonomous Okrug
Coat of arms
RussiaEvenkia2005.png
CountryRussia
Federal districtSiberian[1]
Economic regionEast Siberian[2]
Established10 December 1930
CapitalTura
Government
 o BodyLegislative Assembly
 o Last GovernorBoris Zolotaryov
Area
 o Total763,197 km2 (294,672 sq mi)
Area rank7th
Population
 o Estimate 
(2007)
16,979
Time zoneUTC+7 (MSK+4 Edit this on Wikidata[4])
Official languagesRussian[5]

Evenk Autonomous Okrug (Russian: , Evenkiysky avtonomny okrug; Evenki: , ?v?de Avt?m?de Okrug), or Evenkia, was a federal subject of Russia (an autonomous okrug of Krasnoyarsk Krai). It had been created in 1930. Its administrative center was the urban-type settlement of Tura. As of 2006, at 767,600 km2, it was Russia's seventh largest federal subject, and the country's least populous: .[6]

In 1999, the governor of Krasnoyarsk, General Alexander Lebed, demanded the okrug recognize the central district government of Krasnoyarsk had authority over it, which the okrug refused to do, causing a power struggle between the central district and the okrug's government.[7]

Following a referendum on the issue held on April 17, 2005, Evenk and Taymyr Autonomous Okrugs were merged into Krasnoyarsk Krai effective January 1, 2007 (some Evenks contested the results, however). Administratively, they are now considered to be districts with special status within Krasnoyarsk Krai; municipally, they have a status of municipal districts (see Evenkiysky District).

Boris Zolotaryov was the last governor of the autonomous okrug.

Administrative divisions

Map of Evenkia

Before 2007, Evenk AO contained three districts:

Demographics

Population

(2002): 17,697.

Vital statistics

Source: Russian Federal State Statistics Service
Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000)
1970 13 314 144 170 24.2 11.1 13.1
1975 15 254 159 95 16.9 10.6 6.3
1980 17 373 167 206 21.9 9.8 12.1
1985 22 521 219 302 23.7 10.0 13.7
1990 24 514 189 325 21.3 7.8 13.5
1991 24 427 221 206 17.7 9.1 8.5
1992 24 414 249 165 17.5 10.5 7.0
1993 23 297 270 27 13.1 11.9 1.2
1994 21 294 257 37 13.9 12.1 1.7
1995 20 299 214 85 14.8 10.6 4.2
1996 20 269 223 46 13.5 11.2 2.3
1997 20 261 202 59 13.3 10.3 3.0
1998 19 244 220 24 12.7 11.4 1.2
1999 19 251 203 48 13.4 10.8 2.6
2000 18 242 214 28 13.3 11.7 1.5
2001 18 274 234 40 15.3 13.1 2.2
2002 18 263 237 26 14.9 13.4 1.5
2003 18 274 215 59 15.6 12.3 3.4
2004 17 267 218 49 15.4 12.6 2.8
2005 17 283 259 24 16.5 15.1 1.4
2006 17 282 236 46 16.6 13.9 2.7

Ethnic groups

Of the 17,697 residents (as of the 2002 census) 2 (0.01%) chose not to specify their ethnic background. Of the rest, residents identified themselves as belonging to 67 ethnic groups, including ethnic Russians (62%), Evenks (21.5%), Yakuts (5.6%), Ukrainians (3.1%), Kets (1.2%), 162 Tatars (0.9%), 152 Khakas (0.9%) and 127 Volga Germans (0.7%).

Ethnic
group
1939 census 1959 census 1970 census 1979 census 1989 census 2002 census
Number % Number % Number % Number % Number % Number %
Evenks 3,721 39.3% 3,474 33.7% 3,207 25.3% 3,239 20.3% 3,480 14.0% 3,802 21.5%
Yakuts 713 7.5% 51 0.5% 781 6.2% 822 5.1% 937 3.8% 991 5.6%
Kets 14 0.1% 142 1.1% 154 1.0% 150 0.6% 211 1.2%
Russians 4,675 49.4% 5,975 57.9% 7,732 61.1% 10,400 65.1% 16,718 67.5% 10,958 61.9%
Ukrainians 117 1.2% 196 1.9% 254 2.0% 472 3.0% 1,303 5.3% 550 3.1%
Others 234 2.5% 610 5.9% 542 4.3% 881 5.5% 2,181 8.8% 1,185 6.7%

See also

References

  1. ^ ? . ? No849  13 2000 ?. «? ? ? ? ? ». ? ? ? 13 2000 ?. : " ? ", No. 20, . 2112, 15 2000 ?. (President of the Russian Federation. Decree #849 of May 13, 2000 On the Plenipotentiary Representative of the President of the Russian Federation in a Federal District. Effective as of May 13, 2000.).
  2. ^ ? . No 024-95 27 ? 1995 ?. « ? ? . 2. ? », ? . No5/2001 ?. (Gosstandart of the Russian Federation. #OK 024-95 December 27, 1995 Russian Classification of Economic Regions. 2. Economic Regions, as amended by the Amendment #5/2001 OKER. ).
  3. ^ ? (Federal State Statistics Service) (2004-05-21). "?, ?, ? ? ? ? ? (Territory, Number of Districts, Inhabited Localities, and Rural Administration by Federal Subjects of the Russian Federation)". ? 2002 ? (All-Russia Population Census of 2002) (in Russian). Federal State Statistics Service. Retrieved .
  4. ^ " ? ?". - ? (in Russian). 3 June 2011. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ Official throughout the Russian Federation according to Article 68.1 of the Constitution of Russia.
  6. ^ Russian Federal State Statistics Service (21 May 2004). , ? ? ? ?, ?, , ? ? - ? ? ? ? ? ? 3  ? ? [Population of Russia, Its Federal Districts, Federal Subjects, Districts, Urban Localities, Rural Localities--Administrative Centers, and Rural Localities with Population of Over 3,000] (XLS). ? 2002 ? [All-Russia Population Census of 2002] (in Russian).
  7. ^ National Geographic. The Book of Peoples. Page 139

Coordinates: 64°00?00?N 100°00?00?E / 64.0000°N 100.0000°E / 64.0000; 100.0000


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