Euroseries 3000
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Euroseries 3000
Auto GP
AutoGPlogo.png
CategorySingle seaters
RegionEurope
Inaugural season1999
Folded2016
Drivers9
Teams5
ConstructorsLola
Engine suppliersZytek
Tyre suppliersKumho Tires[1]
Last Drivers' championMexico Luis Michael Dörrbecker
Last Teams' championItaly Torino Squadra Corse
Official websiteautogp.net

Auto GP, sometimes referred to as the Auto GP World Series and formerly known as both Euro Formula 3000 and the Euroseries 3000, was a European formula racing series.

The series' roots can be traced back to 1999 and the Italian Formula 3000 series, organised by Pierluigi Corbari, which used old Lola chassis with Zytek engines. The teams used the Lola T96/50 in the first two years. At the beginning nearly all races were held in Italy, but very quickly the series expanded and had venues in different European countries.

The series became European Formula 3000 in 2001. The next three years (2001-2003) saw the Lola B99/50 in use. For 2004, Superfund became the series' title sponsor, planning to use a new car with a new set of regulations, named Formula Superfund, but the funding was pulled before the 2005 season got under way and the series was cancelled.

For 2005, Coloni Motorsport established an Italian national-level championship, using the Italian Formula 3000 name. In 2006, Coloni expanded this to form a new European championship named Euroseries 3000 with the Lola B02/50. The Italian series continued to run as part of Euroseries races.

In 2009, the organisers announced that the first-generation A1 Grand Prix cars were allowed alongside the Lola F3000 chassis, replacing the old cars completely from 2010.[2]

The championship itself was rebranded for the 2010 season, with it adopting the Auto GP name. As well as that, the championship will offer a EUR200,000 prize fund at each of its six rounds.[3]

2015 marked the start of the Auto GP World Series working with ISRA, a company from the Netherlands who set up the 2014 FA1 Series, this partnership, however, has not lasted long with the Auto GP Organisation announcing at Round 1 (of the 2015 season) that the two companies have parted ways. The 2015 season was "archived" midway through the season and midway through the 2016 season the series merged with the BOSS GP series.

Results

Formula 3000 era

Auto GP

Scoring system

Current system

Teams only score from their two highest placed cars. 48 points is the maximum possible haul for one driver in a race weekend.

2012 Auto GP points system[5][6]
Race  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th  Pole Position Fastest Lap
R1 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1 1 1
R2 20 15 12 10 8 6 4 3 2 1 1

Previous points systems

Previous Auto GP points systems
Years Race  1st   2nd   3rd   4th   5th   6th   7th   8th   9th   10th  Pole Position Fastest Lap
2011 R1 25 18 15 12 10 8 6 4 2 1 1 1
R2 18 13 10 8 6 4 2 1 1
2006-2010 R1 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 1
R2 6 5 4 3 2 1 1
2005 10 8 6 5 4 3 2 1 1 1
1999-2004 10 6 4 3 2 1

References

  1. ^ "Kumho Tyres and double compound for 2012". Auto GP. Auto GP Organisation. 3 February 2012. Archived from the original on 23 July 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2012-02-17. Retrieved .CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Freeman, Glenn (ed.) (2009-10-29). "Pit & Paddock: Euroseries 3000; Euro 3000 revamped for 2010". Autosport. Vol. 198 no. 5. p. 29.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  4. ^ "Auto GP: Archived season 2015, the staff is working on a national series in 2016 at low cost". Auto GP. Auto GP Organisation. 1 October 2015. Archived from the original on 25 October 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  5. ^ "Auto GP tweaks race 2 points system for 2012 season". Autosport. Haymarket Publications. 29 February 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  6. ^ "More points awarded for Race 2". Auto GP World Series. Auto GP Organisation. 29 February 2012. Retrieved 2012.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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