Against Timarchus
Get Against Timarchus essential facts below. View Videos or join the Against Timarchus discussion. Add Against Timarchus to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Against Timarchus

"Against Timarchus" (Greek: ? ) was a speech by Aeschines accusing Timarchus of being unfit to involve himself in public life. The case was brought about in 346-5 BC, in response to Timarchus, along with Demosthenes, bringing a suit against Aeschines, accusing him of misconduct as an ambassador to Philip II of Macedon.[1] The speech provides evidence of a number of actions which, according to Aeschines, would cause a citizen to lose the right of addressing the Assembly. Aeschines accuses Timarchus of two of these forbidden acts: prostituting himself, and wasting his inheritance.[2] Along with the accusations of prostitution and squandering his inheritance for which Timarchus was on trial, the speech contains charges of "bribery, sycophancy, the buying of office, embezzlment, and perjury".[3]

Modern scholars have criticised the lack of evidence that Aeschines put forward in Against Timarchus,[4] for instance by pointing out that he has no evidence that any of Timarchus' lovers ever paid him.[5] Indeed, Hubbard observes that he does not even manage to produce a single witness who will testify that Timarchus had any sexual relationship with the men in question at all,[6] though in his speeches Aeschines says that Timarchus' affairs were well known to the jury.[7] Aeschines won the case and Timarchus was punished by disenfranchisement.[8]

References

  1. ^ Cook, Brad L. (2012). "Swift-boating in Antiquity: Rhetorical Framing of the Good Citizen in Fourth-Century Athens". Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric. 30 (3): 223-224.
  2. ^ Cook, Brad L. (2012). "Swift-boating in Antiquity: Rhetorical Framing of the Good Citizen in Fourth-Century Athens". Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric. 30 (3): 225.
  3. ^ Hunter, Virginia (1990). "Gossip and the Politics of Reputation in Classical Athens". Phoenix. 44 (4): 310.
  4. ^ Cook, Brad L. (2012). "Swift-boating in Antiquity: Rhetorical Framing of the Good Citizen in Fourth-Century Athens". Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric. 30 (3): 226.
  5. ^ Lanni, Adriaan (2010). "The Expressive Effect of Athenian Prostitution Laws". Classical Antiquity. 29 (1): 54.
  6. ^ Hubbard, T.K. (1998). "Popular Perceptions of Elite Homosexuality in Classical Athens". Arion: A Journal of Humanities and the Classics. 6 (1): 63.
  7. ^ Kenneth J. Dover (1989). Greek Homosexuality. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. p. 22. ISBN 0674362616.
  8. ^ Cook, Brad L. (2012). "Swift-boating in Antiquity: Rhetorical Framing of the Good Citizen in Fourth-Century Athens". Rhetorica: A Journal of the History of Rhetoric. 30 (3): 224.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Against_Timarchus
 



 



 
Music Scenes