Yoshiaki Oshima
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Yoshiaki Oshima

Yoshiaki Oshima ( , ?shima Yoshiaki) (born 1952) is a Japanese astronomer at Gekko Observatory and prolific discoverer of 61 asteroids as credited by the Minor Planet Center, and include the binary asteroid 4383 Suruga, the potentially hazardous object (7753) 1988 XB and the Jupiter trojan .[1][2]

International asteroid monitoring project

Japan Spaceguard Association (JSGA) is keen to have astronomical education for young people and held Spaceguard Private Investigator of the Stars-- the fugitives are asteroids! program in 2001. Yoshiaki Oshima participated as one of the committee member. JSGA submitted a paper on that project in a proceedings, with Oshima as a contributor.[3][Notes 1]

JSGA held an astronomical education program as part of their International Asteroid Monitoring Project, that collaborated with the British Council and its International Schools' Observatory (ISO) program which had involved 12 teams of junior high to senior high school classes from Asian and European countries.[Notes 2]

The Private Investigator of Stars was co-sponsored by the British Council which advised the International Asteroid Monitoring Project by coordinating observatory in the Canary islands and participating laboratories for ISO. Yomiuri Shinbun newspaper held an asteroid hunting contest for the JSGA and run articles on their pages. 438 school classes and other teams signed up with 1,317 indibivisuals, and 133 teams reported the results of their observation.

JSGA based its project headquarters in its observatory called Bisei Spaceguard Center, owned by the Japan Space Forum. An optical telescope on the Canary island has been operated by the staff of Astrophysics Research Institute at John Moore University in Liverpool, and images were transmitted to each classroom via internet connection.[Notes 3]

Honors

The outer main-belt asteroid 5592 Oshima is named after him. The naming citation also mentions his contribution to the development of the instrumentation at the Nihondaira Observatory.[2]

List of discovered minor planets

In 1988, Oshima discovered (7753) 1988 XB, a near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid that approaches the orbit of Earth as close as 2.5 lunar distances. He also discovered , a 64-kilometer sized Jupiter trojan in 1989. By the end of the same year, he discovered 4383 Suruga a binary with a minor-planet moon. All discoveries he made at the Gekko Observatory (see table below).

3843 OISCA 28 February 1987 list
4157 Izu 11 December 1988 list
4261 Gekko 28 January 1989 list
4293 Masumi 1 November 1989 list
4383 Suruga 1 December 1989 list
4403 Kuniharu 2 March 1987 list
9 October 1989 list
4840 Otaynang 23 October 1989 list
28 January 1989 list
5206 Kodomonomori 7 March 1988 list
1 January 1989 list
5282 Yamatotakeru 2 November 1988 list
20 December 1989 list
5397 Vojislava 14 November 1988 list
5730 Yonosuke 13 October 1988 list
5740 Toutoumi 29 November 1989 list
10 March 1988 list
2 December 1989 list
4 November 1989 list
28 January 1989 list
5 December 1988 list
10 October 1988 list
15 December 1988 list
19 February 1988 list
27 November 1989 list
19 February 1988 list
11 November 1988 list
11 November 1988 list
3 December 1988 list
13 November 1988 list
29 October 1989 list
9 October 1988 list
12 November 1988 list
7 December 1988 list
9 October 1988 list
9 March 1989 list
13934 Kannami 11 December 1988 list
14843 Tanna 12 November 1988 list
27 November 1989 list
9 October 1989 list
7 March 1988 list
11 November 1988 list
3 December 1988 list
21 November 1989 list
5 February 1989 list
20 November 1989 list
15 October 1988 list
2 November 1988 list
7 December 1988 list
25 November 1989 list
20 November 1989 list
5 February 1989 list
20 November 1989 list
15 October 1988 list
10 February 1989 list
21 November 1989 list
25 October 1989 list
23 October 1989 list
25 October 1989 list
25 October 1989 list
29 October 1989 list

Works

  • Isobe, S., Atsuo, A., Asher, D., Fuse, T., Hashimoto, N., Nakano, S., K. Nishiyama, Yoshiaki Oshima, Noritsugu Takahashi, J. Terazono, H. Umehara, Takeshi Urata, Makoto Yoshikawa. "Educational program of Japan Spaceguard Association using asteroid search", Spaceguard Detective Agency, Proceedings of Asteroids, Comets, Meteors - ACM 2002. International Conference, 29 July - 2 August 2002

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The Spaceguard Private Investigator of the Stars, an asteroid monitoring program for the youth, was made possible by the special cooperation by the Japan Space Forum, as well as sponsorship from Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, National Space Development Agency of Japan along with John Moore University and Armar Observatory in the UK.[4]
  2. ^ UK has "National Schools' Observatory", an astronomical education for young people, which is held with John Moore University in Liverpool. The University operates a robotic telescope in the Canary Islands, and schools are allowed that they carry out scientific research using the remote telescope.[5][6]
  3. ^ The participating teams were supplied with a computer program "Aarteroid Catcher B-612" that JSGA developed to compare images of asteroids in the night sky. Each team will receive images from the Canary Island telescope and compare them with JSGAs' images, and the mission was monitoring asteroid collision and perhaps unknown asteroids.[7] The contest was due 4 March 2001, and Japan Spaceguard Association (JSGA) examined 133 reports for 10 days. On 14 March, the jury meeting was held, and winners were announced on Yomiuri Shinbun on 20 March. Award overview, assessment comments as well as presentation report, interviews to recipients, along with JSGA's prospects for future astronomic education and asteroid hunting projects.[4]

References

  1. ^ a b "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 31 May 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). "(5592) Oshima". Dictionary of Minor Planet Names - (5592) Oshima. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 475. doi:10.1007/978-3-540-29925-7_5312. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3.
  3. ^ Clarke, Chandra K. "Space Exploration Advocacy in the 21st Century: The Case for Participatory Science" (PDF) (PDF). citizensciencecenter.com: 27. Retrieved 2016. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  4. ^ a b "? " [Recipient of International Asteroid Monitoring Project is announced]. Yomiuri shinbun. 27 March 2001. Archived from the original on 19 May 2001. Retrieved 2016.
  5. ^ "Teacher Zone, National Schools' Observatory". Retrieved 2016.
  6. ^ "JSGA's project named "Private Investigaters of Stars - the fugitives are the asteroids!"". Japan Spaceguard Association. Retrieved 2016.
  7. ^ "New publication: part2". Japan Spaceguard Association. Retrieved 2016.


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