Western Iranian Languages
Get Western Iranian Languages essential facts below. View Videos or join the Western Iranian Languages discussion. Add Western Iranian Languages to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Western Iranian Languages
Western Iranian
Geographic
distribution
Southwest Asia, Central Asia, Caucasus, and western South Asia
Linguistic classificationIndo-European
Subdivisions
Glottologwest2794

The Western Iranian languages are a branch of the Iranian languages, attested from the time of Old Persian (6th century BC) and Median.

Languages

Map of modern Iranian languages. The Western Iranian languages are shaded yellow/green.

The traditional Northwestern branch is a convention for non-Southwestern languages, rather than a genetic group. The languages are as follows:[1][2]

Old Iranian
Middle Iranian
Neo-Iranian

An Iranian Khalaj language has been claimed, but does not exist; the Khalaj speak a Turkic language.

The dialects of Central Iran are a geographic rather than genetic grouping. They are spoken mostly in Markazi and Isfahan provinces. Many of them are giving way to Persian in the younger generations.[3]

See also

References

  1. ^ Gernot Windfuhr, 2009, "Dialectology and Topics", The Iranian Languages, Routledge, pp. 12-15.
  2. ^ Languages preceded by question marks, and many of the varieties of Persian, are from other sources. The dialects of the Central Plateau are from the source provided there.
  3. ^ a b Central dialects, Gernot Windfuhr, Encyclopedia Iranica
  4. ^ Glottolog changed the designation of this language family from "Semnanic" (https://glottolog.org/files/glottolog-2.7/semn1240.htmt) to "Komisenian"(https://glottolog.org/resource/languoid/id/komi1276). This designation has been also adopted by Wiktionary (http://www.popflock.com/dictionary?s=Category:Komisenian_languages)
  5. ^ Borjian, Habib, "Kerman Languages", Encyclopaedia Iranica. Volume 16, Issue 3, 2017, pp. 301-315. [1]

Bibliography

  • Compendium Linguarum Iranicarum, ed. Rüdiger Schmitt. Wiesbaden: L. Reichert Verlag, 1989; p. 99.

External links

  • "Contact and the diversity of noun-noun subordination strategies among Western Iranic languages" (PDF). Nicholas Kontovas Indiana University Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Western_Iranian_languages
 



 



 
Music Scenes