Three Great Gardens of Japan
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Three Great Gardens of Japan
The oldest water fountain in Japan continues functioning at Kenroku-en in Kanazawa.

The Three Great Gardens of Japan (, Nihon Sanmeien), also known as "the three most famous gardens in Japan" are considered to include Kenroku-en in Kanazawa, Koraku-en in Okayama and Kairaku-en in Mito.[1]

The conception of gardens in a group of three is found elsewhere, for example, in the three gardens of Emperor Go-Mizunoo, who abdicated in 1629. At Shugakuin Imperial Villa, Go-Mizunoo maintained landscaped areas at separate elevations on the northeastern outskirts of Kyoto.[2]

Kenroku-en (Kanazawa)

"garden which combines six characteristics"[3] – the six aspects considered important in the notion of an ideal garden: spaciousness, serenity, venerability, scenic views, subtle design, and coolness.[4]

Koraku-en (Okayama)

"garden of pleasure after", which is a reference to a saying attributed to Confucius--explaining that a wise ruler must attend to his subjects' needs first, and only then should he consider his own interests.[5]

Kairaku-en (Mito)

"a garden to enjoy with people." Nariaki Tokugawa, who completed the garden, opened this private garden to the general populace. This was a novel concept which eventually led to the development of public parks.[6]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Lewis, Caroline. "Kenrokuen Garden Kanazawa," JapanVisitor.com; Koraku-en, Japan-Guide.com; and
  2. ^ Japan Society of London. (1989). Proceedings, Issues 112-120, p. 54.
  3. ^ "Kenroku-en," Ishikawa Prefecture, 2003.
  4. ^ Bornoff, Nicholas. (2008). National Geographic Traveler Japan, p. 150.
  5. ^ "Koraku-en," GoJapanGo.com; "Kairaku-en," Japan National Tourist Organization (JNTO).
  6. ^ Kairaku-en garden, JapanAtlas.com

References

  • Bornoff, Nicholas. (2008). National Geographic Traveler Japan. Washington, D.C.: National Geographic Society. ISBN 978-1-426-20234-6 OCLC 195701863
  • Japan Society of London. (1989). Proceedings, Issues 112-120. London: Japan Society of London. OCLC 15680299

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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