Takada Domain
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Takada Domain
Corner Yagura of Takada Castle, the administrative centre of Takada Domain
Takada Domain
under Tokugawa shogunate Japan
1610-1871
CapitalTakada Castle
Area
 o Coordinates37°6?36?N 138°15?21?E / 37.11000°N 138.25583°E / 37.11000; 138.25583Coordinates: 37°6?36?N 138°15?21?E / 37.11000°N 138.25583°E / 37.11000; 138.25583
 o TypeDaimy?
Historical eraEdo period
o Established
1610
o Disestablished
1871
Today part ofpart of Niigata Prefecture
1839 map showing Nagaoka and Takada Domains

Takada domain (, Takada han), was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan. It was located in Echigo Province, in the Hokuriku region of Honsh?. The domain was centered at Takada Castle, located in what is now part of the city of J?etsu in Niigata Prefecture.[1][2][3] It was also known as Fukushima Domain (, Fukushima han).

History

During the Sengoku period, the area around Takada was controlled by the Uesugi clan. After Toyotomi Hideyoshi relocated Uesugi Kagekatsu to Aizu, he assigned the area to one of his generals, Hori Hideharu, who had distinguished himself in various battles. During the Battle of Sekigahara, Hori sided with Tokugawa Ieyasu; however as Echigo Province had many supporters and former retainers of the Uesugi clan, he was ordered to remain in Echigo on guard duty. After the establishment of the Tokugawa Shogunate, his son Hori Tadatoshi faced any problems with restless peasants, religious disputes, and an internal family dispute which resulted in his dispossession and exile.

He was replaced by Matsudaira Tadateru, the 6th son of Tokugawa Ieyasu, who built Takada Castle. This also served to strengthen the position of the shogunate against the powerful tozama Maeda clan of Kanazawa Domain. However, in 1616 Matsudaira Tadateru fell from favour with Tokugawa Hidetada at the Siege of Osaka and was dispossessed. The domain was then much reduced in kokudaka and assigned to a number of fudai clans. A junior branch of the Sakai clan briefly ruled Takada from 1616 to 1618, followed by Matsudaira Tadamasa from 1619-1623. Takada was then assigned to Matsudaira Mitsunaga, from another branch of the same Echizen-Matsudaira clan, from 1618 to 1681. This gave Takada a period of much-needed stability; however, he was also dispossessed following an O-Ie S?d?. Takada was then ruled as tenry? territory directly by the Tokugawa shogunate from 1681-1685.

Takada Domain was revived in 1685 for Inaba Masamichi, who ruled until his transfer to Sakura Domain in 1707. He was followed by Toda Tadazane, formerly of Sakura Domain, who held the post to his transfer to Utsunomiya Domain in 1710. Takada was then assigned to a junior branch of the Hisamatsu-Matsudaira clan, who ruled uneventfully from 1710 until their transfer to Shirakawa Domain in 1741.

Sakakibara Masazumi was transferred from Himeji Domain in 1741 at the age of six as punishment for issues created by his father, Sakakibara Masamine. Although the Sakakibara clan continued to rule Takada through the Meiji Restoration in 1868, it faced an early crisis with the death of Sakakibara Masazumi before his formal audience with the Sh?gun. To avoid the possibility of attainder, the clan secretly substituted Masazumi with his younger brother Sakakibara Masanaga and kept the death a secret. The Sakaibara ruled Takada with relative stability though the rest of the Edo period. During the Boshin War, Sakakibara Masataka the 6th (and final) Sakakibara daimy? of Takada sided with the imperial cause, and after the Aizu War, many of the former samurai from Aizu were exiled to Takada. The head of the Sakakibara clan was ennobled with the title of viscount in the kazoku peerage system.[4]

Bakumatsu period holdings

As with most domains in the han system, Takada Domain consisted of several discontinuous territories calculated to provide the assigned kokudaka, based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[5][6]

List of daimy?

# Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank kokudaka Notes
Mon Hori.svg Hori clan (tozama) 1598-1610
1 Hori Hideharu () 1598-1606 Saemon-no-sho (?); Jij? () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 450,000 koku
2 Hori Tadatoshi () 1606-1610 -unknown- Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 450,000 koku dispossessed
Mitsubaaoi.jpg Matsudaira clan (shimpan) 1610-1616
1 Matsudaira Tadateru (?) 1610-1616 Sakon-no-shosjo () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 750,000 koku dispossessed
Kamon maru ni kenkatabami2.png Sakai clan (fudai) 1616-1619
1 Sakai Ietsugu (?) 1616-1618 Saemon-no-sh? (?) Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 100,000 koku from Takasaki Domain
2 Sakai Tadakatsu (?) 1616-1619 Kunai-no-taifu (?) Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 100,000 koku to Matsushiro Domain
Mitsubaaoi.jpg Matsudaira clan (shimpan) 1618-1623
1 Matsudaira Tadamasa (?) 1618-1623 Iyo-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 259,000 koku to Fukui Domain
Mitsubaaoi.jpg Matsudaira clan (shimpan) 1624-1681
1 Matsudaira Mitsunaga (?) 1624-1681 Echigo-no-kami (); Chunagon () Junior 3rd Rank () 260,000 koku dispossessed
Mitsubaaoi.jpg tenry? 1681-1685
Inaba crest1.svg Inaba clan (fudai) 1686-1701
1 Inaba Masamichi (?) 1686-1701 Tango-no-kami (); Jij? () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 103,000 koku to Sakura Domain
Japanese Crest mutu Hosi(White background).svg Toda clan (fudai) 1701-1710
1 Toda Tadazane (?) 1701-1710 Yamashiro-no-kami (); Jij? () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 68,000 koku to Utsunomiya Domain
Hoshi Umebachi inverted.svg Hisamatsu-Matsudaira clan (fudai) 1710-1741
1 Matsudaira Sadashige (?) 1710-1712 Etch?-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 113,000 koku from Kuwana Domain
2 Matsudaira Sadamichi (?) 1712-1718 Inaba-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 113,000 koku
3 Matsudaira Sadateru (?) 1718-1725 Etch?-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 113,000 koku
4 Matsudaira Sadamori (?) 1725-1727 Etch?-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 113,000 koku
5 Matsudaira Sadayoshi (?) 1727-1741 Etch?-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 113,000 koku to Shirakawa Domain
Japanese crest Sakakibara gennjikuruma.png Sakakibara clan (fudai) 1741-1871[4]
1 Sakakibara Masazumi (?) 1741-1744 Etch?-no-kami () Junior 5th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 150,000 koku from Himeji Domain
2 Sakakibara Masanaga (?) 1744-1789 Shikibu-no-sh? (?); Jij? () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 150,000 koku
3 Sakakibara Masaatsu (?) 1789-1810 Shikibu-no-sh? (?); Jij? () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 150,000 koku
4 Sakakibara Masanori (?) 1810-1827 Omi-no-kami () Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?)
5 Sakakibara Masakiyo (?) 1827-1839 Uky?-daifu (?) Junior 4th Rank, Lower Grade (?) 150,000 koku
6 Sakakibara Masachika (?) 1839-1861 Shikibu-no-sh? (?); Jij? () Lower 4th (?) 150,000 koku
7 Sakakibara Masataka (?) 1861-1871 Shikibu-no-sh? (?); Jij? () Lower 4th (?) 150,000 koku Viscount

Sakakibara Masazumi

Sakakibara Masazumi (?, December 11, 1735 - January 13, 1745) was the 4th Sakakibara daimy? of Himeji Domain, and the 1st Sakakibara daimy? of Takada, and the 9th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masazumi was the eldest son of Sakakibara Masamine, and became daimy? in 1741 on the forced retirement of his father, who had angered Sh?gun Tokugawa Yoshimune by flaunting sumptuary edicts, and purchasing the freedom of Takao Daiyu, a famed courtesan from a Yoshiwara brothel for a tremendous sum of money. Yoshimune further punished Masamine by ordering the transfer of the clan from Himeji to Takada, which, although it had the same nominal kokudaka, was remote and cold and had a portion of lands spread over a number of exclaves in Mutsu Province. Masazumi died at the age of 10 without having been received in formal audience by the Sh?gun. This placed the domain in grave danger of attainder, as without having been formally acknowledged, the clan could not maintain the succession through a posthumous adoption. The clan therefore kept Masazumi's death a secret, and renamed his younger brother to take his place.

Sakakibara Masanaga

Sakakibara Masanaga (?, July 9, 1736 - January 26, 1808) was also the 1st Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 10th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masanaga was the second son of Masamine and younger brother of Masazumi by the same mother. Masazumi died in 1745 at age 10 before having been received in audience by the Sh?gun, so then clan kept the death secret and renamed Masanaga to take his place. He was formally received by Sh?gun Tokugawa Ieshige] in 1750. His tenure was uneventful and his received promotion to Junior 4th Court Rank in 1754 and the additional courtesy title of Jij? in 1784. In 1789 he retired in favour of his son, and his courtesy title was changed to Uky?-daifu. His wife was a daughter of Hotta Masasuke of Sakura Domain. In 1810, after an uneventful tenure, he retired in favour of his eldest son.

Sakakibara Masaatsu

Sakakibara Masaatsu (?, September 25, 1755 - March 19, 1819) was the 2nd Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 10th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masaatsu was the second son of Masazumi, and became daimy? on the retirement of his father in 1789. His wife was Nao, a daughter of Ikeda Munemasa of Okayama Domain. In 1810, after an uneventful tenure, he retired in favour of his eldest son.

Sakakibara Masanori

Sakakibara Masanori (?, April 26, 1776 - August 5, 1861) was the 3rd Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 11th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masanori was the eldest son of Masaatsu, but by a concubine. He became daimy? on the retirement of his father in 1810. His wife a daughter of Nabeshima Harushige of Saga Domain. He was noted as an outstanding ruler, reforming the domain's finances, ordering all of his samurai to plant fruit trees in their gardens, improving crop yields and developing onsen. He also managed to negotiate the exchange of 50,000 koku of the domain's territories which was in remote exclaves in Mutsu Province with equivalent territories within Echigo. He retired in 1827 in favour of his son, but died in 1861 at the age of 86.

Sakakibara Masakiyo

Sakakibara Masakiyo (?, April 10, 1798 - October 11, 1846) was the 4th Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 12th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masakiyo was the eldest son of Masanori and became daimy? on the retirement of his father in 1827. His wife a daughter of Ii Naonaka of Hikone Domain. During his tenure, his retired father continued to rule behind-the-scenes. He retired in 1839 in favour of his own son, and died in 1846 at the age of 49.

Sakakibara Masachika

Sakakibara Masachika (?, February 5, 1814 - September 16, 1861) was the 5th Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 15th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masachika was the fifth son of Masakiyo and became daimy? on the retirement of his father in 1839. His wife a daughter of MizunoTadakuni of Hamamatsu Domain. During his tenure, his retired grandfather continued to rule behind-the-scenes. He retired in 1839 in favour of his own son, and died in 1861 with an heir.

Sakakibara Masataka

Sakakibara Masataka (?, February 1843 - March 7, 1927) was the 6th (and final) Sakakibara daimy? of Takada and the 16th hereditary chieftain of the Sakakibara clan. Masataka was the eldest son of Sakakibara Masanori (?), the third son of Masanori (?) who was 3rd daimy? of Takada. On the death of Masachika without heir in 1861, he was chosen as posthumous successor. HIs wife was a daughter of Arima Harusumi of Maruoka Domain. In 1866, his forces accompanied the forces of Hikone Domain in the Second Ch?sh? expedition, but were badly outmatched by the numerically inferior but better armed Ch?sh? forces. At the time of the Boshin War, he initially attempted to remain neutral; however, when forces of the Satch? Alliance entered Takada, his force chased the remaining shogunate forces out, and he defected to the imperial side. The forces of Takada were called upon to attack neighbouring Nagaoka Domain and later Aizu Domain. At the end of the war, many Aizu samurai were sent as prisoners to Takada, but were treated well by a largely sympathetic populace. In 1869, he was appointed imperial governor of Takada until the abolition of the han system in 1871. He received the kazoku peerage title of shishaku (viscount) in 1884.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Echigo Province" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-4-7.
  2. ^ Nussbaum, Louis Frédéric et al. (2005). "Takada" in Japan Encyclopedia, p. 931., p. 931, at Google Books
  3. ^ "Echigo Province" at JapaneseCastleExplorer.com; retrieved 2013-4-8.
  4. ^ a b Papinot, Jacques Edmond Joseph. (1906). Dictionnaire d'histoire et de géographie du Japon; Papinot, (2003). "Sakakibara" at Noblaire du Japon, p. 51.
  5. ^ Mass, Jeffrey P. and William B. Hauser. (1987). The Bakufu in Japanese History, p. 150.
  6. ^ Elison, George and Bardwell L. Smith (1987). Warlords, Artists, & Commoners: Japan in the Sixteenth Century, p. 18.

External links


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