Synizesis
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Synizesis

Synizesis is a sound change (metaplasm) in which two originally syllabic vowels are pronounced as a single syllable without change in writing.[1] In Latin and Greek, the reason was often to preserve meter, but similar changes can occur naturally.

A tie may be used to represent this pronunciation: d?͡hinc (i.e., deinc).

Examples

Greek

Homer (Iliad 1.1-2):

??͡? ?
Mênin áeide the?̀ P?l?ïáde͡? Akhilêos

Latin

Vergil's Aeneid:

1.41 ?n?us ob noxam et furi?s Ai?cis O?l?͡??
1.131 Eurum ad s? Zephyrumque vocat, d?͡hinc t?lia f?tur
6.412 d?turbat laxatque for?s; simul accipit alve͡?

Etymology

Synizesis comes from the Greek "a sitting together" from "with" and "I sit".

See also

References

  1. ^ Greenough, J. B. (2001) [1903], Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar (Focus ed.), Newburyport, MA: Focus Publishing, p. 392 (§603 c. n.), ISBN 1-58510-042-0; Smyth, Herbert Weir (1984) [1920], Greek Grammar, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, pp. 19-20 (§60-61), ISBN 0-674-36250-0



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Synizesis
 



 



 
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