Stolac
Get Stolac essential facts below. View Videos or join the Stolac discussion. Add Stolac to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Stolac
Stolac

Stolac
Stolac
Flag of Stolac
Flag
Official seal of Stolac
Seal
Location of Stolac within Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Location of Stolac within Bosnia and Herzegovina.
Coordinates: Coordinates: 43°04?57?N 17°57?21?E / 43.08250°N 17.95583°E / 43.08250; 17.95583
CountryBosnia and Herzegovina
EntityFederation of Bosnia and Herzegovina
Government
 o Municipality presidentStjepan Bo?kovi? (HDZ BiH)
Area
 o Total331 km2 (128 sq mi)
Population
(2013 census)
 o Total14,889
 o Density45/km2 (120/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 o Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Area code(s)+387 36
WebsiteOfficial website

Stolac is a town and municipality located in Herzegovina-Neretva Canton of the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina, an entity of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It is located in the region of Herzegovina.

Stolac is situated in the area known as Herzegovina Humina on the tourist route crossing Herzegovina and linking the Bosnian mountainous hinterland with the coastal regions of Bosnia and Herzegovina, Dubrovnik and Montenegro. The road, running from Sarajevo via Mostar, Stolac, Ljubinje and Trebinje, enables one to reach Dubrovnik in less than 4 hours.[1]

Thanks to the town's favourable natural environment - geological composition, contours, climate, hydrographic and vegetation - Stolac and its area have been settled since ancient times. Its rich hunting-grounds along with other natural benefits attracted prehistoric man, and later the Illyrians, Romans and Slavs, all of whom left a wealth of anthropological evidence.[2]

History

Walls of ancient Daorson, located at O?anji?i near Stolac.

The area has been settled for at least 15,000 years, as evidenced by the markings in Badanj Cave, which experts have dated 12,000-16,000 BCE. Three kilometers west of Stolac is an impressive ste?ak necropolis dating back to the 15th and 16th centuries: Radimlja.

These ste?ak tombstones are carved with epitaphs, detailed portraits of the deceased, and motifs such as grape vines, hunting scenes, and wild animals. Five of the Radimlja tombstones are thought to mark the graves of members of the Hrabren Miloradovi? Valachian family.

Ali-pa?a Rizvanbegovi? (1783-1851), the semi-independent ruler (vizier) of Ottoman Herzegovina from 1833 to 1851, was born in the Begovina neighbourhood of Stolac.

Architecture

Old city architecture
Fortress of Stolac, 1905

Containing, in one small area, unique cultural and aesthetic values, Stolac's historic core is an example of a complex cultural-historical and natural environmental ensemble. It is an example of the organic connection between human and natural architectures, which also testifies to the fact that the beauty of the location was crucial in its building and planning - the guiding principle often present in the development of medieval towns.

Nine historical layers compose Stolac's architectural ensemble: pre-history, Illyrian-Roman period, the early Middle Ages, advanced and late Middle Ages, Ottoman period, Austro-Hungarian period, and the time of the first and second Yugoslavia. A multitude of various influences on the architecture of town, in which contrasts and similarities are frequently evident as well as planning and full spontaneity, lend this town a complex image. Despite its unusual history and inclusion into four empires (Roman, Byzantine, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian), three kingdoms (Bosnian, Hungarian and Yugoslav), three world's monotheistic religions - Christianity (Orthodox Christianity and Catholicism), Islam, and Judaism, the historical core of Stolac is still a coherent and harmonious cultural-historical monument with individual properties grown together into one ensemble.[2]

During the Yugoslav Wars, a number of monuments were demolished by Croat extremists as part of a campaign of ethnic cleansing, including town's four mosques, dating from the 16th to 18th centuries, and the Orthodox Church of the Holy Assumption of Christ. [3]

In 2003 the Commission to Preserve National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina designated Stolac Old Town as a National Monument of Bosnia and Herzegovina. Article 3 of that decision provides that "only research and conservation work and rehabilitation and restoration works, shall be allowed to be carried out, including the works aimed at promoting the National Monument" and "no buildings or any temporary and permanent structures shall be allowed to be constructed and erected at the site of the national monument unless their sole purpose is to protect and promote the monument."

"Way of the Cross"

4-mt stone cross built in 2004 within the Stolac Fortress as a first marker of the 14-station "way of the cross"

During war-time HVO control, city authorities controlled by HDZ BiH decided to build 14 crosses marking the "Stations of the Cross" within Old Town Stolac. They started from the Old Town Fortress, ultimately constructing eight wooden crosses. In 2002, they replaced the first wooden cross with a four-meter high stone cross, despite objections from the Commission to Preserve National Monuments of Bosnia and Herzegovina, which in 2003 designated the whole old town as National Monument. The following year, city authorities started replacing the other wooden crosses with concrete crosses. The Federation Ministry for Spatial Planning ordered the removal of the concrete crosses and the halting of works. This decision has never been implemented.

The saga restarted in 2019, when the Catholic Church Parish Office of St. Elias the Prophet in Stolac decided to build an additional six crosses to complete the "Stations of Cross." The Stolac Municipal Council greenlighted the project in November. Mayor Boskovic claims the six crosses fall in the second zone of the protected area and do not desecrate the monument and that the municipality has a positive opinion from the Herzegovina-Neretva Canton's Institute for Protection of National Monuments. The new construction commenced in early 2020 but was called off due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In February, the Federation Inspectorate ordered the removal of all 14 cross foundations. Stolac Municipality appealed the decision, and on 16 March the Federation Ministry for Spatial Planning annulled the Inspectorate's decision, stating that the first instance body had "wrongly established the factual situation." Construction of the six new crosses resumed on 29 June 2020.

Tourist attractions

Notable people

Alphabetic list. Turkish names by first name where surname not mentioned (Jezzar Pasha under J, Ali-pa?a Rizvanbegovi? under R).

Demographics

Population

Population of settlements - Stolac municipality
Settlement 1971. 1981. 1991. 2013.
Total 19,230 18,910 18,681 14,889
1 Aladini?i 747 1,234
2 Bjelojevi?i 325 229
3 Borojevi?i 717 601
4 Burmazi 369 223
5 Crni?i-Greda 658 1,501
6 Crni?i-Kula 628 570
7 Hodovo 418 377
8 Kru?evo 300 241
9 O?anji?i 1,102 1,004
10 Pje?ivac-Greda 512 417
11 Pje?ivac-Kula 823 744
12 Poplat 457 1,402
13 Poprati 340 250
14 Prenj 790 684
15 Rotimlja 718 683
16 Stolac 3,809 5,210 5,530 3,816
17 Trijebanj 352 278

Ethnic composition

Following the Dayton peace treaty, the territory of the 1991 municipality of Stolac was divided between the municipality of Stolac in the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina and the new municipality of Berkovi?i in Republika Srpska, where most of the Bosnian Serbs from Stolac now reside.

Ethnic composition - Stolac town
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971.
Total 3,816 (100,0%) 5,530 (100,0%) 5,210 (100,0%) 3,809 (100,0%)
Bosniaks 2,647 (69,37%) 3,426 (61,95%) 3,113 (59,75%) 2,437 (63,98%)
Croats 892 (23,38%) 653 (11,81%) 586 (11,25%) 421 (11,05%)
Serbs 144 (3,774%) 1,111 (20,09%) 982 (18,85%) 846 (22,21%)
Others 133 (3,485%) 101 (1,826%) 8 (0,154%) 22 (0,578%)
Yugoslavs 239 (4,322%) 486 (9,328%) 43 (1,129%)
Montenegrins 28 (0,537%) 35 (0,919%)
Albanians 5 (0,096%) 5 (0,131%)
Macedonians 2 (0,038%)
Ethnic composition - Stolac municipality
2013. 1991. 1981. 1971.
Total 14,889 (100,0%) 18,681 (100,0%) 18,910 (100,0%) 19,230 (100,0%)
Croats 8,486 (58,52%) 6,188 (33,12%) 6,410 (33,90%) 7,041 (36,61%)
Bosniaks 5,544 (38,23%) 8,101 (43,36%) 7,359 (38,92%) 7,113 (36,99%)
Serbs 279 (1,924%) 3,917 (20,97%) 4,332 (22,91%) 4,900 (25,48%)
Others 193 (1,331%) 168 (0,899%) 49 (0,259%) 56 (0,291%)
Yugoslavs 307 (1,643%) 711 (3,760%) 63 (0,328%)
Montenegrins 33 (0,175%) 50 (0,260%)
Roma 7 (0,037%)
Albanians 6 (0,032%) 6 (0,031%)
Macedonians 3 (0,016%) 1 (0,005%)

Settlements of Stolac municipality, 1991

Aladini?i, Barane, Berkovi?i, Bitunja, Bjelojevi?i, Borojevi?i, Br?tanik, Burmazi, Crni?i-Greda, Crni?i-Kula, Dabrica, Do, Hatelji, Hodovo, Hrgud, Komanje Brdo, Kozice, Kru?evo, Ljubljenica, Ljuti Do, Me?a, Orahovica, O?ani?i, Pje?ivac-Greda, Pje?ivac-Kula, Poplat, Poprati, Predolje, Prenj, Rotimlja, Stolac, Strupi?i, Suzina, epan Krst, Trijebanj, Trusina and ?egulja.

Climate

Climate in this area has mild differences between highs and lows, and there is adequate rainfall year-round. The Köppen Climate Classification subtype for this climate is "Cfa" (Humid subtropical climate).[4]

Climate data for Stolac
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °C (°F) 9
(48)
11
(51)
15
(59)
19
(67)
24
(75)
29
(85)
33
(92)
33
(91)
28
(82)
22
(71)
16
(60)
9
(49)
21
(69)
Average low °C (°F) 3
(37)
2
(36)
6
(43)
9
(48)
13
(55)
17
(62)
19
(66)
19
(66)
16
(61)
12
(54)
9
(48)
4
(39)
11
(51)
Average precipitation cm (inches) 13
(5)
12
(4.7)
13
(5.2)
13
(5.2)
7.9
(3.1)
8.4
(3.3)
4.8
(1.9)
4.3
(1.7)
10
(4)
17
(6.5)
19
(7.3)
18
(7.2)
140
(55.1)
Source: Weatherbase [5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "www.stolac.org is Expired or Suspended". www.stolac.org.
  2. ^ a b The natural and architectural ensemble of Stolac, unesco.org; accessed 4 November 2016.
  3. ^ Robert Bevan, The Destruction of Memory, pp. 47-47
  4. ^ Climate Summary for Stolac, weatherbase.com; accessed 3 April 2018.
  5. ^ "Weatherbase.com". Weatherbase.com. 2013. Retrieved 2013.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Stolac
 



 



 
Music Scenes