Songkhla Resource | Learn About, Share and Discuss Songkhla At Popflock.com




Songkhla
Get Songkhla essential facts below, , or join the Songkhla discussion. Add Songkhla to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Songkhla
Songkhla

City of Songkhla
Songkhla City
Songkhla City
Official seal of Songkhla
Seal
Songkhla is located in Thailand
Songkhla
Songkhla
Location in Thailand
Coordinates: 7°12?22?N 100°35?48?E / 7.20611°N 100.59667°E / 7.20611; 100.59667
CountryThailand
ProvinceSongkhla
DistrictMueang Songkhla
Government
 o TypeCity Municipality
 o MayorSomsak Tantiseranet
Area
 o Total9.27 km2 (3.58 sq mi)
Elevation
11 m (36 ft)
Population
(2006)
75,048
Time zoneUTC+7 (ICT)
Area code(+66) 74
Websitesongkhlacity.go.th
Laem Samila beach

Songkhla (Thai: , pronounced [s.k?l?:]), also known as Singgora or Singora (Pattani Malay), is a city (thesaban nakhon) in Songkhla Province of southern Thailand, near the border with Malaysia. As of 2006 it had a population of 75,048. Songkhla lies 968 km (601 mi) south of Bangkok.[1]

Despite being smaller than the neighboring city Hat Yai, Songkhla is the capital of Songkhla Province as well as the Mueang Songkhla District (Songkhla town district).

At the opening of Songkhla Lake to the Gulf of Thailand, Songkhla is a fishing town and also an important harbour. It is the major seaport on the east side of the Isthmus of Kra.

Naga Head at Song Thale Park, Laem Son On, Songkhla City

History

French hydrographic / topographic map of Songkhla, during the reign of King Narai the Great, 1687.
Songkhla looking west from Khao Tangkuan, c. 1930.
Songkhla's Nakhon Nok Rd., c. 1932.

The name Songkhla is the Thai variant of "Singgora" (Jawi); its original name means 'the city of lions' in Malay (not to be confused with Singapura). This refers to a lion-shaped mountain near the city of Songkhla. Archaeological excavations on the isthmus between Lake Songkhla and the sea reveal that in the 10th through the 14th century this was a major urbanized area, and a center of international maritime trade, in particular with Quanzhou in China. The long Sanskrit name of the state that existed there has been lost; its short Sanskrit name was Singhapura ('Lion City') (not to be confused with Singapura), a city state. The short vernacular name was Satingpra, coming from the Mon-Khmer sting/steng/stang (meaning 'river') and the Sanskrit pura ('city').[2]:320-321

The ruins of the ancient port city of Satingpra are just few kilometres north of Songkhla. It was one of the most important trading centres of the Tambralinga Kingdom. Archaeological digs and investigations conducted toward the end of the 20th century testify the existence of a fortified citadel protected by a moat and a quadrangular surrounding wall made of brick. A sophisticated system of canals connected the sea to the Songkhla Lake permitting the circulations of ships. The excavations brought to light artifacts of great historical and artistic value.[3]

On 8 December 1941 local time, hours before the 7 December (Hawaii time) attack on Pearl Harbor, the Imperial Japanese army landed in Songkhla invading Thailand. It then moved south towards Perlis and Penang as part of the Malayan campaign which culminated in the capture of Singapore.[4]

Since 2003, Songhkla has been affected by separatist insurgencies in neighboring Narathiwat, Pattani, and Yala.[5]

The municipality's mayor, Peera Tantiserane, was murdered there in 2012.[6]

Climate

Songkhla has a tropical monsoon climate (Köppen climate classification Am). Temperatures are very warm to hot throughout the year with only minor variation. There is a short dry season in February and March; the rest of the year is wet, with especially heavy rainfall from October to December.

Climate data for Songkhla (1981-2010)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 32.4
(90.3)
34.3
(93.7)
35.3
(95.5)
36.8
(98.2)
38.6
(101.5)
37.1
(98.8)
36.6
(97.9)
37.3
(99.1)
35.8
(96.4)
38.5
(101.3)
34.0
(93.2)
32.6
(90.7)
38.6
(101.5)
Average high °C (°F) 29.6
(85.3)
30.3
(86.5)
31.4
(88.5)
32.5
(90.5)
33.0
(91.4)
33.1
(91.6)
32.9
(91.2)
33.0
(91.4)
32.3
(90.1)
31.4
(88.5)
29.8
(85.6)
29.2
(84.6)
31.5
(88.7)
Daily mean °C (°F) 27.1
(80.8)
27.5
(81.5)
28.1
(82.6)
28.9
(84.0)
28.8
(83.8)
28.6
(83.5)
28.3
(82.9)
28.2
(82.8)
27.8
(82.0)
27.3
(81.1)
26.9
(80.4)
26.7
(80.1)
27.9
(82.2)
Average low °C (°F) 24.7
(76.5)
24.7
(76.5)
25.0
(77.0)
25.4
(77.7)
25.4
(77.7)
25.1
(77.2)
24.8
(76.6)
24.7
(76.5)
24.5
(76.1)
24.3
(75.7)
24.3
(75.7)
24.4
(75.9)
24.8
(76.6)
Record low °C (°F) 20.8
(69.4)
20.4
(68.7)
19.7
(67.5)
21.1
(70.0)
22.1
(71.8)
21.1
(70.0)
21.1
(70.0)
21.9
(71.4)
21.4
(70.5)
21.1
(70.0)
20.4
(68.7)
20.7
(69.3)
19.7
(67.5)
Average rainfall mm (inches) 74.8
(2.94)
48.6
(1.91)
59.7
(2.35)
75.1
(2.96)
119.6
(4.71)
99.9
(3.93)
95.0
(3.74)
109.4
(4.31)
136.9
(5.39)
257.1
(10.12)
545.9
(21.49)
444.7
(17.51)
2,066.7
(81.37)
Average rainy days 10.0 5.3 7.1 8.5 13.0 13.2 12.7 13.8 15.5 19.9 22.6 20.4 162.0
Average relative humidity (%) 78 77 78 78 78 77 77 76 79 82 84 82 79
Mean monthly sunshine hours 179.8 183.6 204.6 201.0 151.9 150.0 151.9 151.9 144.0 111.6 105.0 142.6 1,877.9
Mean daily sunshine hours 5.8 6.5 6.6 6.7 4.9 5.0 4.9 4.9 4.8 3.6 3.5 4.6 5.2
Source #1: Thai Meteorological Department[7]
Source #2: Office of Water Management and Hydrology, Royal Irrigation Department (sun and humidity)[8]

Population

The majority of the population is Buddhist with a large proportion of Muslims, especially in the rural areas fringing the Malaysian border. These Muslims speak Yawi language, a Malay-related language which has some Thai influence especially loan words borrowed from the Thai language.[9]

Songkhla's district (amphoe) has five tambon administrative organizations (). Songkhla town takes up the whole of Bo Yang division.

No. Name Thai Villages Pop.
1. Bo Yang - 74,875
2. Khao Rup Chang ? 10 38,662
3. Ko Taeo 9 10,608
4. Phawong ? 8 24,130
5. Thung Wang 10 10,343
6. Ko Yo 9 4,454

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ "Distance: Bangkok to Songkhla". Google Maps. Retrieved 2015.
  2. ^ Stargardt, Janice (2001). "Behind the Shadows: Archaeological Data on Two-Way Sea Trade Between Quanzhou and Satingpra, South Thailand, 10th-14th century". In Schottenhammer, Angela (ed.). The Emporium of the World: Maritime Quanzhou, 1000-1400. Volume 49 of Sinica Leidensia. Brill. pp. 309-393. ISBN 90-04-11773-3.
  3. ^ Michel Jacq-Hergoualc'h (2002). BRILL (ed.). The Malay Peninsula: Crossroads of the Maritime Silk-Road (100 Bc-1300 Ad). Translated by Victoria Hobson. pp. 411-416. ISBN 90-04-11973-6.
  4. ^ Parfitt, Allen. "Bicycle Blitzkreig [sic] The Japanese Conquest of Malaya and Singapore 1941-1942". MilitaryHistoryOnline.com. Retrieved 2012.
  5. ^ Morch, Maximillian (2018-02-06). "The Slow Burning Insurgency in Thailand's Deep South". The Diplomat. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ "'Hitman' sought in Peera murder". Bangkok Post. 2012-11-13. Retrieved .
  7. ^ "Climatological Data for the Period 1981-2010". Thai Meteorological Department. p. 25. Retrieved 2016.
  8. ^ " Penman Monteith (Reference Crop Evapotranspiration by Penman Monteith)" (PDF) (in Thai). Office of Water Management and Hydrology, Royal Irrigation Department. p. 121. Retrieved 2016.
  9. ^ Yegar, Moshe (2002). Between Integration and Secession; The Muslim Communities of the Southern Philippines, Southern Thailand, and Western Burma/Myanmar (eBook). Lexington Books. ISBN 9780739103562. Retrieved .

External links

Coordinates: 7°12?22?N 100°35?48?E / 7.20611°N 100.59667°E / 7.20611; 100.59667


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Songkhla
 



 



 
Music Scenes