Sloop
Get Sloop essential facts below. View Videos or join the Sloop discussion. Add Sloop to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Sloop
Typical Bermuda-rigged sloop

A sloop is a sailing boat with a single mast[1] typically meaning one headsail in front of the mast, and one mainsail aft of (behind) the mast. This is called a fore-and-aft rig, and can be rigged as a Bermuda rig with triangular sails fore and aft, or as a gaff-rig with triangular foresails and a gaff rigged mainsail. Sailboats can be classified according to type of rig, and so a sailboat may be a sloop, catboat, cutter, ketch, yawl, or schooner.[2] A sloop usually has only one headsail, although an exception is the Friendship sloop, which is usually gaff-rigged with a bowsprit and multiple headsails.[3] If the vessel has two or more headsails, the term cutter may be used,[4] especially if the mast is stepped further towards the back of the boat.

The name originates from the Dutch sloep, which is related to the Old English sl?pan, to glide.[5] In naval terminology, "sloop-of-war" refers to the purpose of the craft, rather than to the specific size or sail-plan, and thus a sloop should not be confused with a sloop-of-war.

After the cat rig which has only a single sail,[6] the Bermuda rig is the simplest sailing rig configurations. It is the most popular yacht rigging[7] because it is easier to sail with a smaller crew or even single-handed, it is cheaper since it has less hardware than more complex rigs, and it sails well into the wind. A limitation is that when a boat gets over 45 feet in length, the sails become so large that they are difficult to handle,[6] although modern technology is helping with this.

The headsail can be masthead-rigged or fractional-rigged. On a masthead-rigged sloop, the forestay (on which the headsail is carried) attaches at the top of the mast. On a fractional-rigged sloop, the forestay attaches to the mast at a point below the top. A sloop may use a bowsprit, a spar that projects forward from the bow.

See also

  • Mast aft rig, a single mast rig with a mast further back than a sloop or cutter
  • Chialoup, an historical type of sloop produced in the East Indies.
  • Bermuda Fitted Dinghy: a scaled-down sloop used for racing in Bermuda.
  • Hope: an example of a traditional sail-powered oyster-dredging sloop.

References

  1. ^ "SLOOP | meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary". dictionary.cambridge.org. Retrieved .
  2. ^ "Cutter | sailing craft". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved .
  3. ^ Jones, Gregory O. (2001-12-06). The American Sailboat. MBI Publishing Company. ISBN 9780760310021.
  4. ^ "Cutter | sailing craft". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved .
  5. ^ "Sloop". dictionary.com. Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ a b "What's in a Rig? Cat Rig". American Sailing Association. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "Sailboat Rig Types: Sloop, Cutter, Ketch, Yawl, Schooner, Cat". Jordan Yacht and Ship Co. Retrieved 2019.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Sloop
 



 



 
Music Scenes