Shozo Sato
Get Shozo Sato essential facts below. View Videos or join the Shozo Sato discussion. Add Shozo Sato to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Shozo Sato

Sh?z? Sat? (born 1933) is a professor emeritus of the College of Art and Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is the founder and former director of Japan House, and a former artist-in-residence at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.[1]

He is an internationally renowned Japanese master of Zen arts and visionary theatre director, most known for adapting Western classics to Japanese Kabuki theatre.[1]

Biography

Sat? first arrived at the University of Illinois in 1964 as a visiting artist. In 1968, he founded the Japanese Arts and Culture Program, where he taught classes in traditional Japanese arts, such as calligraphy, sumi-e, ikebana, zen aesthetics, and tea ceremony.[1]

He is known for adapting western theater to a Kabuki style. Some of his adaptations include Macbeth, Medea, Othello, Faust, Achilles, and the operas, Madame Butterfly and The Mikado.[1][2] His last academic production was a Kabuki adaptation of Othello, titled Iago's Plot (2017), at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, at the Krannert Center for the Performing Arts.[3]

He is also a visiting professor at Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois.[4]

Sat? is the author of The Art of Arranging Flowers: A Complete Guide to Japanese Ikebana, published in 1968 by Harry N. Abrams, Incorporated, New York, NY. The volume was printed and bound in Japan.[5]

Sat? officiated at the wedding of actors Nick Offerman and Megan Mullally.[6]

Honours

In 2004, the Japanese Order of the Sacred Treasure was conferred.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d Vicic, Shannon (September 17, 1998). "Shozo Sato to receive honorary degree at commencement". Inside Illinois. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. 18 (6). Archived from the original on June 14, 2010. Retrieved 2018.
  2. ^ "Shozo Sato Papers, 1964-2004" (PDF). University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Archives. Retrieved 2018.
  3. ^ "Iago's Plot". Krannert Center for the Performing Arts. March 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  4. ^ "Ikebana for the 21st Century". Ikebana International San Francisco Bay Area Chapter. April 18, 1997. Archived from the original on December 13, 2004. Retrieved 2018.
  5. ^ Sat?, Sh?z? (July 1, 1968). The Art of Arranging Flowers: A Complete Guide to Japanese Ikebana. New York: Harry N. Abrams. ISBN 978-0-81090-194-0.
  6. ^ "Interview with Nick Offerman". Larry King Live. Season 1. Episode 176. June 11, 2013. CNN.
  7. ^ "About Shozo Sato". Illinois State University. November 10, 2006. Archived from the original on July 19, 2011. Retrieved 2018.



  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Shozo_Sato
 



 



 
Music Scenes