Shield
Get Shield essential facts below. View Videos or join the Shield discussion. Add Shield to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Shield
Zulu chief Goza and two of his councillors in war-dress, all with Nguni shields, c.1870. The size of the shield on the chief's left arm denotes his status, and the white colour that he is a married man.[1]

A shield is a piece of personal armour held in the hand, which may or may not be strapped to the wrist or forearm. Shields are used to intercept specific attacks, whether from close-ranged weaponry or projectiles such as arrows, by means of active blocks, as well as to provide passive protection by closing one or more lines of engagement during combat.

Gallery

See also

References

  1. ^ Wood, J. G. (1870). The uncivilized races of men in all countries of the world. ?. p. 115. ISBN 9785878634595.

Bibliography

  • Drummond, James (1890). "Notes on Ancient Shields and Highland Targets". Archaeologia Scotica. 5.
  • Schulze, André(Hrsg.): Mittelalterliche Kampfesweisen. Band 2: Kriegshammer, Schild und Kolben. - Mainz am Rhein. : Zabern, 2007. - ISBN 3-8053-3736-1
  • Snodgrass, A.M. "Arms and Armour of the Greeks." Cornell University Press, 1967
  • "The Hoplite." The Classical Review, 61. 2011.
  • Hellwag, Ursula. "Shield(s)." Encyclopaedia Aethiopica, Siegbert Uhllig (ed.), vol. 4, 650-651. Wiesbaden: Harrassowitz.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Shield
 



 



 
Music Scenes