Sergei Yutkevich
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Sergei Yutkevich

Sergei Yutkevich
Sergei Yutkevich.jpg
Sergei Yutkevich
Born
Sergei Iosifovich Yutkevich

(1904-12-28)28 December 1904
Died24 April 1985(1985-04-24) (aged 80)
OccupationFilm director, screenwriter
Years active1925-1980

Sergei Iosifovich Yutkevich (Russian: ? ? , 28 December 1904[1] – 24 April 1985) was a Soviet film director and screenwriter. He was a People's Artist of the USSR (1962) and a Hero of Socialist Labour (1974).

Life and career

Memorial to Sergei Yutkevich on wall of building in Moscow, where he lived

He began work as a teen doing puppet shows. Between 1921 and 1923 he studied under Vsevolod Meyerhold.[2] Later he helped found the Factory of the Eccentric Actor (FEKS), which was primarily concerned with circus and music hall acts. He entered films in the 1920s and began directing in 1928. His films often were cheerier than most Russian films as he was influenced by American slapstick, among other things. However he also did serious historical films, docudramas, and biopics.[3]

He won Cannes's Best Director Award twice: for Othello in 1956 and for Lenin in Poland in 1966. Of his later films Lenin in Paris is among the best known. In 1959, he was a member of the jury at the 1st Moscow International Film Festival.[4] Two years later, he was on the jury of the 2nd Moscow International Film Festival.[5] In 1967 he was the President of the Jury of the 5th Moscow International Film Festival.[6]

Filmography

References

  1. ^ "Sergei Yutkevich". Retrieved 2015.
  2. ^ , ? (2004). . ? . (in Russian). Moscow (21/22).
  3. ^ Allmovie
  4. ^ "1st Moscow International Film Festival (1959)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  5. ^ "2nd Moscow International Film Festival (1961)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  6. ^ "5th Moscow International Film Festival (1967)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 2012.

External links



  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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