Sakura Domain
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Sakura Domain
Moats of Sakura Castle, administrative center of Sakura Domain

Sakura Domain (, Sakura-han) was a feudal domain under the Tokugawa shogunate of Edo period Japan, located in Shim?sa Province (modern-day Chiba Prefecture), Japan. It was centered on Sakura Castle in what is now the city of Sakura, Chiba. It was ruled for most of its history by the Hotta clan.

History

Sakura Domain was originally created for Takeda Tadateru, the fifth son of Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1593, near the site of an ancient castle of the Chiba clan, which had fallen into ruins in the early Sengoku period. The domain subsequently passed through a bewildering number of hands during the 1600s, before coming under the control of the Hotta clan in the mid-18th century. During the Bakumatsu period, Hotta Masayoshi was one of the major proponents of rangaku and an ending to the country's national isolation policy. He was one of the signers of the Treaty of Amity and Commerce with the United States. His son, Hotta Masatomo was a key supporter of the Tokugawa shogunate in the early stages of the Boshin War. After the Meiji Restoration, he was pardoned, and eventually made a count (hakushaku) in the kazoku peerage.

Holdings at the end of the Edo period

As with most domains in the han system, Sakura Domain consisted of several discontinuous territories calculated to provide the assigned kokudaka, based on periodic cadastral surveys and projected agricultural yields.[1][2]

  • Shim?sa Province
    • 31 villages in Chiba District
    • 146 villages in Imba District
    • 26 villages in Shimohabu District
    • 3 villages in Katori District
    • 3 villages in S?sa District
    • 2 villages in Kaij? District
    • 8 villages in S?ma District
  • Dewa Province (Uzen)
    • 45 villages in Murayama District
  • Hitachi Province
    • 3 villages in Tsukuba District
    • 3 villages in Makabe District
  • Shimotsuke Province
    • 16 villages in Tsuga District
    • 10 villages in Shioya District
  • Musashi Province
    • 3 villages in Saitama District
    • 1 village in Koma District
    • 2 villages in Iruma District
    • 14 villages in Yokomi District
  • Sagami Province
    • 5 villages in K?za District
    • 10 villages in ?sumi District
    • 2 villages in Aiko District

List of daimy?

# Name Tenure Courtesy title Court Rank kokudaka
Japanese crest Tokugawa Aoi.svg Takeda clan (shimpan) 1593-1602
1 Takeda Nobuyoshi (?) 1593-1602 -none- -none- 40,000 koku
Japanese crest Tokugawa Aoi.svg Matsudaira clan (shimpan) 1602-1603
1 Matsudaira Tadateru (?) 1602-1603 Sakone-no-shosho () Lower 4th (?) 50,000 koku
Mon ogasawara.svg Ogasawara clan (fudai) 1603-1608
1 Ogasawara Yoshitsugu () 1603-1608 Izumi-no-kami () Lower 5th (?) 22,000 koku
Mutsu-Mizuguruma crest.jpg Doi clan (fudai) 1608-1633
1 Doi Toshikatsu (?) 1608-1633 ?i-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 32,000 -> 142,000 koku
Maru-ni-Sasarindo.jpg Ishikawa clan (fudai) 1633-1634
1 Ishikawa Tadafusa (?) 1633-1634 Tonomo-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 70,000 koku
Maruni-Toshi no Monji.jpg Matsudaira (Katahara) clan (fudai) 1634-1640
1 Matsudaira Ienobu (?) 1634-1638 Kii-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 40,000 koku
2 Matsudaira Ienobu (?) 1638-1640 Wakasa-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 40,000 koku
Japanese crest Hotta Mokkou.svg Hotta clan (fudai) 1642-1640
1 Hotta Masamori (?) 1642-1651 Dewa-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 110,000 koku
2 Hotta Masanobu (?) 1651-1660 Kozuke-no-suke () Lower 5th (?) 110,000 koku
Japanese crest Tuta.svg Matsudaira clan (fudai) 1661-1678
1 Matsudaira Norihisa (?) 1661-1678 Izumi-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 60,000 koku
Okubo mon.jpg ?kubo clan (fudai) 1678-1686
1 ?kubo Tadatomo (?) 1678-1686 Kaga-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 83,000 -> 93,000 koku
Hoshi Umebachi inverted.jpg Toda clan (fudai) 1699-1701
1 Toda Tadamasa ( ) 1686-1699 Yamashiro-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 61,000 -> 71,000 koku
1 Toda Tadazane (?) 1699-1701 Yamashiro-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 71,000 koku
Inaba crest1.svg Inaba clan (fudai) 1701-1723
1 Inaba Masamichi (?) 1701-1707 Tango-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 102,000 koku
2 Inaba Masatomo (?) 1707-1723 Tango-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 102,000 koku
Japanese crest Tuta.svg Matsudaira clan (fudai) 1723-1746
1 Matsudaira Norisato (?) 1723-1745 Izumi-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 60,000 koku
2 Matsudaira Norisuke (?) 1745-1746 Izumi-no-kami () Lower 5th (?) 60,000 koku
Japanese crest Hotta Mokkou.svg Hotta clan (fudai) 1746-1871
1 Hotta Masasuke (?) 1746-1761 Sagami-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 100,000 ->110,000 koku
2 Hotta Masanari (?) 1761-1805 Sagami-no-kami (); Jiju () Lower 4th (?) 110,000 koku
3 Hotta Masatoki (?) 1805-1811 Sagami-no-kami () Lower 5th (?) 110,000 koku
4 Hotta Masachika (?) 1811-1824 Sagami-no-kami () Lower 5th (?) 110,000 koku
5 Hotta Masayoshi (?) 1825-1859 Sagami-no-kami () Lower 4th (?) 110,000 koku
6 Hotta Masatomo (?) 1859-1871 Sagami-no-kami () Lower 5th (?) 110,000 koku

References

  • Papinot, E (1910). Historical and Geographic Dictionary of Japan. Tuttle (reprint) 1972.
  • Bolitho, Harold (1974). Treasures among men; the fudai daimyo in Tokugawa Japan. New Haven: Yale University Press.
  • Kodama K?ta ?, Kitajima Masamoto ? (1966). Kant? no shohan . Tokyo: Shin Jinbutsu ?raisha.

External links

Notes


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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