SSL 1300
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SSL 1300

The SSL 1300, previously the LS-1300 and the FS-1300, is a satellite bus produced by SSL (company). Total broadcast power ranges from 5 to 25 kW, and the platform can accommodate from 12 to 150 transponders. The SSL 1300 is a modular platform and SSL no longer reports designators for sub-versions, such as: 1300E, 1300HL, 1300S, 1300X.[1]

First available in the late 1980s, the SSL 1300 platform underwent revision multiple times over its design life, all the while remaining a popular communications platform.[2] The earliest models provided 5,000 RF watts of transmitter power, weighed 5,500 kg, and required a 4-meter diameter launch fairing. Newer models provide double that, approximately 10,000 RF watts of transmitter power, weigh 6,700 kg, and require a 5-meter diameter launch fairing.[3]

SSL stated that they would use electric propulsion for North-South station keeping for the first time on the MBSat in 2004. The subsystem was supplied by International Space Technologies Inc and used Fakel's Hall thrusters and American and European propellant supply and electronics.[4] According to Moog-ISP, the SSL 1300 platform uses its bipropellant thrusters.[5]

In September 2015 SSL announced that it had delivered 100 satellites based on the SSL 1300 platform. There are more SSL 1300's currently providing service on orbit than any other model communications satellite.[6]

SSL 1300 Firsts

Over the last 25 years the SSL 1300 was the first platform to incorporate many innovations.

  • It was the first satellite to use a 100-volt bus and Direct Radiating Collector (DRC) amplifiers, providing the higher power needed for direct-to-home television.[6]
  • It was the first true high-throughput satellite, an advance which now enables millions of people around the world to have access to relatively high speed broadband.[6]
  • It was the first to reach 20-kW of power, which enables satellite broadcast of today's HD and UltraHD television.[6]
  • It was the first satellite to provide two-way ground-based beam forming, which increases a satellite's flexibility to meet changing business requirements.[6]

Other advances:

  • The 1300 was one of the first platforms to use shaped antenna reflectors, which enable precisely defined coverage areas.[6]
  • The 1300 was the first Western satellite to use electric propulsion, which reduces mass allowing for more payload power or a less costly launch. Today there are 18 1300s with electric propulsion on orbit.[6]
  • The 1300 was one of the first platforms to incorporate lithium-ion batteries, which have 50 percent less mass than the nickel-hydrogen batteries they replaced and helped to enable higher power satellites.[6]
  • The world's two highest capacity broadband satellites currently providing service are built on the 1300 platform.[6]

Deployed units

Western Hemisphere

Location Satellite Source Operator Type Coverage Launch date/rocket (GMT) All locations Remarks As of
129.0°W Galaxy-27 US Intelsat Television broadcasting & Satellite Internet Access , Ariane 44LP Formerly known as IA-7 and Telstar-7 2008-11-20
123.0°W Galaxy-18 US Intelsat Television and radio broadcasting North America , Zenit-3SL Hybrid C/Ku band satellite 2008-11-19
121.0°W Galaxy-23 US Intelsat Direct Broadcasting North America , Zenit-3SL Hybrid C/Ka band/Ku band satellite; C-band payload referred to as Galaxy-23 2008-11-26
EchoStar-9 US Echostar/DISH Network Direct Broadcasting North America , Zenit-3SL Hybrid C/Ka band/Ku band satellite; Ku/ka band payload referred to as EchoStar-9 2008-11-26
119.0°W DirecTV-7S US DirecTV Direct Broadcasting 54 Ku band transponders[7] , Zenit-3SL 8 active transponders at this time 2008-11-26
110.0°W EchoStar-11 US Echostar/DISH Network Direct Broadcasting , Zenit-3SL 2008-11-19
DirecTV-5 US DirecTV Direct Broadcasting , Proton 32 Ku band transponders
101.1°W DirecTV-9S US DirecTV Direct Broadcasting , Ariane 5-ECA
97.0°W Galaxy-19 US Intelsat Television and Radio Broadcasting 24 C- and 28 Ku band transponders North America , Zenit-3SL 2008-11-20
77.0°W EchoStar-8 US Echostar/DISH Network Direct Broadcasting , Proton 110°W[8] 2008-11-19
72.7°W EchoStar-6 US Echostar/DISH Network Direct Broadcasting , Atlas IIAS 2008-11-19

Eastern Hemisphere

Location Satellite Source Operator Type Coverage Launch date/rocket (GMT) All locations Remarks As of
68.5°E Intelsat 7 ESA , Ariane 44LP
166.0°E Intelsat 8 US Intelsat Cable Head-End & Direct Broadcasting C and Ku band transponders Asia-Pacific
Australia
, Proton-K

In transit

En route to Satellite Source Operator Type Coverage Launch date/rocket (GMT) Previous locations Remarks As of
166.0°E Intelsat 19 US Intelsat Cable Head-End & Direct Broadcasting 24 C and 34 Ku band transponders Asia-Pacific
Australia
, Zenit-3SL Replacing Intelsat 8 2012-6-1
93.1°W Galaxy-25 US , Proton-K formerly Telstar 5 2008-11-20

Failures

The SSL 1300 had a series of failures in 2001. Since that time, electrical failures (Intelsat 7, PAS 6, Galaxy 27) and failure of the satellite's solar panels to properly deploy (Estrela do Sul 1, Telstar 14R, Intelsat 19) are recurring issues.

Satellite Operator Detail Failure Date
Echostar 5 Echostar Dual momentum wheel failures.[9] 2001-07 and 2003-12
Echostar 6 Echostar Partial thruster failure. 2001
Telstar 14 / Estrela do Sul 1 Telesat Solar panel deployment failure.[10] 2004-01-11
Telstar 14R / Estrela do Sul 2 Telesat Solar panel deployment failure.[10] 2011-05-20
GOES 9 NOAA Momentum wheel problems. 1998-06-01
PAS 6 PanAmSat Total power loss. 2004-03-17 and 2004-04-01
Intelsat 7 Intelsat Partial power loss. 2001-09-06
Galaxy 26 Intelsat Multiple system failures. Control processor failure. 2001 and 2008-06-28
Galaxy 27 Intelsat Electrical failure. 2004-11-28.
DirecTV 6 DirecTV Solar flare damage. 1997-04
Intelsat 19 Intelsat Solar panel deployment failure.[11][12] 2012-06-01

References

  1. ^ "1300 Series Satellite Platform". Space Systems/Loral. Archived from the original on 10 February 2010.
  2. ^ "FS-1300". Encyclopedia Astronautica. Archived from the original on 5 July 2009.
  3. ^ "Space Service Loral (SSL): LS-1300". Gunter's Space Page.
  4. ^ "International Space Technologies, Inc. Debuts Its Stationary Plasma Thrusters On Loral-Built MBSat Satellite". SSL. 28 June 2004. Retrieved 2016.
  5. ^ "Thrusters". Moog Inc. Retrieved 2016.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i "SSL Achieves Milestone, 100 Satellites Delivered Based on the 1300". sslmda.com. Retrieved 2015.
  7. ^ "Space Systems/Loral-Built DIRECTV 7S Satellite Successfully Launched". Space Systems/Loral. Archived from the original on 3 February 2013.
  8. ^ "EchoStar Satellites and Orbital Slots". Echostar Knowledge Base. Archived from the original on 6 March 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  9. ^ "Spacecraft Digest - Echostar 5". Analytical Graphics, Inc. (AGI). Archived from the original on 7 July 2011.
  10. ^ a b de Selding, Peter B. (25 May 2011). "Balky Satellite Solar Panel Threatens Telesat's Growth Plans in S. America". Space News. Retrieved 2012.
  11. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (2 June 2012). "Intelsat 19 Satellite Fails To Deploy Solar Array". Space News. Retrieved 2012.
  12. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (7 June 2012). "Probe of IS-19 Solar Array Problem Focuses on Sea Launch Rocket". Space News. Retrieved 2012.

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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