Royal Peculiar
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Royal Peculiar

A royal peculiar is a Church of England parish or church exempt from the jurisdiction of the diocese and the province in which it lies, and subject to the direct jurisdiction of the monarch.

Definition

The church parish system dates from Saxon times when most early churches were provided by the lord whose estate land coincided with that of the parish. A donative parish (or "peculiar") was one that was exempt from diocesan jurisdiction.[1] There are several reasons for peculiars but usually they were held by a senior churchman from another district, parish or diocese. They could include the separate or "peculiar" jurisdiction of the monarch, another archbishop or bishop, or the dean and chapter of a cathedral (also, the Knights Templar and the Knights Hospitaller).[2] An archbishop's peculiar is subject to the direct jurisdiction of an archbishop and a royal peculiar is subject to the direct jurisdiction of the monarch.[3]

Most peculiars survived the Reformation but, with the exception of royal peculiars, were finally abolished during the 19th century by various Acts of Parliament and became subject to the jurisdiction of the diocese in which they lay, although a few non-royal peculiars still exist.[2][3] The majority of royal peculiars that remain are within the Diocese of London.[4]

Present day

London

Edinburgh

Cambridge

Windsor

Former royal peculiars

Non-royal peculiars

The following chapels of the Inns of Court are extra-diocesan, and therefore peculiars, but not Royal:

See also

Related concepts in secular government

Notes

  1. ^ The parish is unique in being a 'peculiar' parish (one of only two left in the country). The chaplain was not appointed by the bishop but by the squire who is officially the 'Lay Prior, Ordinary, Patron and Rector of the Peculiar and Parish of Southwick'. This has been the case since the dissolution of Southwick Priory, in 1539. St Nicholas, Boarhunt dates from 1064, and St James, Southwick (officially St James-without-the-priory-gate), may also be pre-Norman Conquest, although it has less surviving original fabric.[25]
  2. ^ Christ Church is a joint foundation of a College of Oxford and the Cathedral Church of the Diocese of Oxford. The Crown is the "Visitor" of the cathedral not the Bishop.[30]

Citations

  1. ^ Friar 2004, p. 309.
  2. ^ a b Hey 2008, p. 532.
  3. ^ a b Chisolm 1911, p 36. Line four onwards:- "As a term of ecclesiastical law "peculiar" is applied to.....".
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Church of England | Dioceses". Anglicans Online. 12 June 2011. Retrieved 2012.
  5. ^ "The Dean of Her Majesty's Chapels Royal". London: Diocese of London. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ "The Queen's Chapel of the Savoy". London: The Duchy of Lancaster. 2015. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "The Chapel of St Mary Undercroft - UK Parliament". Parliament.uk. 21 April 2010. Retrieved 2012.
  8. ^ Boffey, Daniel (27 November 2011). "First female Commons chaplain tells laddish MPs: grow up, boys". The Observer. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ "About Us". London: Royal Foundation of St Katherine. Retrieved 2014.
  10. ^ Inner Temple Library website (retrieved 10 August 2018)
  11. ^ G. C. Baugh, et al. "Colleges: Penkridge, St Michael". In: A History of the County of Stafford. Volume 3, ed. M. W. Greenslade and R. B. Pugh (London, 1970), pp. 298-303. Retrieved 23 June 2015.
  12. ^ "Tettenhall Royal Free Chapel". The National Archives. Retrieved 2015.
  13. ^ Willam Page, ed. (1926). "Houses of Benedictine monks: The priory of Dover". A History of the County of Kent: Volume 2. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 133-137. Retrieved 2014.
  14. ^ Tomlinson 1907, Chapter X.
  15. ^ "Collegiate churches: Other churches (except Beverley and York)," in A History of the County of York: Volume 3, ed. William Page (London: Victoria County History, 1974), 359-375. British History Online, accessed June 15, 2021, http://www.british-history.ac.uk/vch/yorks/vol3/pp359-375.
  16. ^ "A Brief History of the Minster". Wimborne Minster and the Northern Villages. Retrieved 2019.
  17. ^ G. C. Baugh; L. W. Cowie; J. C. Dickinson; A. P. Duggan; A. K. B. Evans; R. H. Evans; Una C. Hannam; P. Heathn; D. A. Johnston; Hilda Johnstone; Ann J. Kettle; J. L. Kirby; R. Mansfield; A. Saltman (1970). M. W. Greenslade; R. B. (eds.). "Colleges: Wolverhampton, St Peter". A History of the County of Stafford. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 2014.
  18. ^ Denton 1970, p. 116.
  19. ^ Denton 1970, p. 109.
  20. ^ Mary Lobel, ed. (1962). "Parishes: Dorchester". A History of the County of Oxford. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 2014.
  21. ^ Denton 1970, p. 122.
  22. ^ G. C. Baugh; L. W. Cowie; J. C. Dickinson; A. P. Duggan; A. K. B. Evans; R. H. Evans; Una C. Hannam; P. Heathn; D. A. Johnston; Hilda Johnstone; Ann J. Kettle; J. L. Kirby; R. Mansfield; A. Saltman (1970). M. W. Greenslade; R. B. (eds.). "Colleges: Stafford, St Mary". A History of the County of Stafford: Volume 3. Institute of Historical Research. pp. 39-64. Retrieved 2014.
  23. ^ Hoskin, Brooke & Dobson 2005, pp. 159-160.
  24. ^ "GENUKI: Hawarden, Flintshire". Retrieved 2018.
  25. ^ "St James Southwick Parish Website". St James, Southwick. Retrieved 2015.
  26. ^ "St James, Southwick Page on the Portsmouth Diocese Website". Portsmouth Diocese. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 2015.
  27. ^ "Chapel Services". London: The Charterhouse. Archived from the original on 9 April 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  28. ^ Hoskin, Brooke & Dobson 2005, p. 2.
  29. ^ McCall, H. B. (1910). Richmondshire Churches. London: E Stock. p. 58. OCLC 6723172.
  30. ^ a b "Annual Report and Financial Statements" (PDF). Christ Church. 31 July 2017. p. 5. Retrieved 2020.
  31. ^ "Christ Church, Bath website". Retrieved 2016.
  32. ^ Historic England. "Chapel of St Lawrence (1193945)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 2020.
  33. ^ "St Lawrence Chapel Warminster". Retrieved 2020.
  34. ^ a b Briden 2013, p. 61.

References

External links


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