Portal:Women's Association Football
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Portal:Women's Association Football

Introduction

High school soccer in the US (2019)

Women's association football, usually known as women's football or women's soccer, is the most prominent team sport played by women around the globe. It is played at the professional level in numerous countries throughout the world and 176 national teams participate internationally.

The history of women's football has seen major competitions being launched at both the national and international levels. Women's football has faced many struggles throughout its history. Although its first golden age occurred in the United Kingdom in the early 1920s, with matches attracting large crowds (one match achieved over 50,000 spectators), The Football Association initiated a ban in 1921 that disallowed women's football games from taking place on the grounds used by its member clubs. This ban remained in effect until July 1971.

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The Saudi Arabia women's national football team would be the national team representing the kingdom in international football. However, the team does not yet exist because of influence of religious leaders in Saudi Arabia and systematic discrimination against women's sport, active opposition of political leaders and sport administrators. International pressure has come to bear on the country to field a women's team, and FIFA now allows the hijab to be worn in competition. A meeting at the College of Business Administration in Jeddah was seen as a possible first step in a team eventually being created.

Despite a lack of official support for a national team and women's football in general, women have self-organised their own teams and play games out of the sight of men. Created in 2006, King's United women football club was the first women's football club in the country. No official data is kept regarding participation rates for women football players.

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Leroux (left) during a friendly match against China on December 15, 2012.

Sydney Leroux (born May 7, 1990) is a Canadian-born American professional soccer player and Olympic gold medalist. As a forward, she currently plays for the Seattle Reign FC in the National Women's Soccer League (NWSL). After representing Canada at various youth levels, she chose to play for the United States women's national under-20 soccer team starting in 2008 and later began playing for the U.S. senior national team in 2012. Leroux has earned over 40 caps with the senior national team and was part of the Americans' winning squad at the 2012 London Olympics.

Leroux played collegiate soccer for the UCLA Bruins and at the semi-professional level for the Vancouver Whitecaps. She made her debut for the Whitecaps at the age of fifteen, becoming the youngest player ever to play for the team. Leroux was the number one pick by the Atlanta Beat during the 2012 WPS Draft on January 13, 2012. Following the suspension of the league in early 2012, she played for the Seattle Sounders Women during the summer of the same year. She made her professional debut for the Boston Breakers in the NWSL during the league's inaugural season in 2013.

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The Frauen-Bundesliga (English: Women Federal League) is the main league competition for women's football (soccer) in Germany. In 1990 the German Football Association (DFB) created the German Women's Bundesliga, based on the model of the men's Bundesliga. It was first played with north and south divisions, but in 1997 the groups were merged to form a uniform league. The league currently consists of twelve teams and the seasons usually last from late summer to the end of spring with a break in the winter.

In the UEFA Women's Champions League, the Frauen-Bundesliga is the most successful league with a total of seven titles from four clubs, with 1. FFC Frankfurt winning the most titles of any club.

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Sydney Leroux in 2012

Rapinoe takes a corner kick in the gold medal match at the 2012 London Olympics


Selected national team

The Canada women's national soccer team represents Canada in international Women's soccer, and is directed by the Canadian Soccer Association. Canada will host the 2015 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The team reached international prominence at the 2003 FIFA Women's World Cup, losing in the Third Place match to the United States. Canada qualified for its first Olympic women's soccer tournament in 2008, making it to the quarterfinals. In November 2010, Canada defeated the Mexico to win the CONCACAF Women's World Cup Qualifier. The team finished the tournament with a 5-0-0 record and did not concede a goal, earning a spot at the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup.

The team won a bronze medal at the 2012 Summer Olympics, defeating France 1-0 in Coventry, England.

Canadian women's soccer fans are also closely linked to the U-20 team (U-19 prior to 2006), partly due to Canada hosting the inaugural FIFA U-19 Women's World Championship in 2002 and winning silver in front of 47,784 fans at Commonwealth Stadium in Edmonton, Alberta.


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  • Join: Add your name to the members list of the Women's football taskforce
  • Contribute: Check the Taskforce's Open task list and see if there's a task you would like to contribute to.
  • Assess existing articles: (see WP:WPFA for assistance) or nominate some of our existing B-class articles for Good Article (GA) or Featured Article (FA) status
  • Improve existing articles: Work on expanding articles in Category:Women's association football biography stubs with relevant content and citations
  • Project Tagging: Tag the talk pages for any articles that are within the scope of this project with {{Football|Women = yes}} and {{WikiProject Women's sport}}.
  • Translate: the page of clubs/players from corresponding articles in other language popflock.com resource articles to English Wikipedia, if we have them as red links.
  • Recruit: editors who have contributed to articles related to women's football

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