Pissuthnes
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Pissuthnes
Pissuthnes
IONIA, Phokaia. Circa 478-387 BC anonymous coinage Satrapal portrait.jpg
Anonymous portrait of a Satrap of Asia Minor, around the time of Pissuthnes. From a coin of Ionia, Phokaia, circa 478-387 BC.
AllegianceStandard of Cyrus the Great (White).svg Achaemenid Empire
RankSatrap of Lydia and Ionia
Pissuthnes was satrap of Lydia, including Ionia.

Pissuthnes, also known as Pissouthnes, (Old Persian Pi?i?yaothna, Greek ?) was an Achaemenid satrap of Lydia, which included Ionia, circa 440-415 BCE. His capital was Sardis.[1][2] He was the son of Hystaspes, probably himself the son of Darius I, which shows his Persian origin and his membership of the Achaemenid dynasty.[3] He held the satrapy for over twenty years, and became extremely rich as a consequence.[4]

He helped the Samians in the Samian Revolt against Athens, and supported various oligarchical movements against Athens along the coast of Asia Minor.[5]

Pissuthnes was probably a grandson of Darius I.

He revolted against the Persian king Darius II Nothus between 420-415 BCE.[6] He recruited Greek mercenaries under the generalship of Lycon for his campaigns.[7]Tissaphernes, who was sent by the King to suppress the revolt of Pissuthnes, managed to bribe Lycon, and then brought Pissuthnes to Susa where he was executed.[8] Tissaphernes became his successor as Satrap of Lydia.[9]

Pissuthnes had a natural son named Amorges, who continued the rebellion against the Persian king.[10]

References

  1. ^ Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 581. ISBN 9781575061207.
  2. ^ Delphi Complete Works of Thucydides (Illustrated). Delphi Classics. 2013. p. 1402. ISBN 9781909496767.
  3. ^ Rawlinson, George (2018). The Persian Empire. Endymion Press. p. 197. ISBN 9781531295752.
  4. ^ Rawlinson, George (1885). The Seven Great Monarchies of the Ancient Eastern World: Or, The History, Geography and Antiquities of Chaldæa, Assyria, Babylon, Media, Persia, Parthia, and Sassanian Or New Persian Empire. J. W. Lovell Company. p. 507.
  5. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. 1970. p. 143. ISBN 9780521233477.
  6. ^ Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 675. ISBN 9781575061207.
  7. ^ Briant, Pierre (2002). From Cyrus to Alexander: A History of the Persian Empire. Eisenbrauns. p. 578. ISBN 9781575061207.
  8. ^ Rawlinson, George (2018). The Persian Empire. Endymion Press. p. 197. ISBN 9781531295752.
  9. ^ The Cambridge Ancient History. Cambridge University Press. 1970. p. 464. ISBN 9780521233477.
  10. ^ Delphi Complete Works of Thucydides (Illustrated). Delphi Classics. 2013. p. 2127. ISBN 9781909496767.


External links


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