Paul Lyneham
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Paul Lyneham

Paul Lyneham
Born(1945-08-13)13 August 1945
Died24 November 2000(2000-11-24) (aged 55)
EducationAustralian National University
OccupationPolitical journalist
Years active1969-2000
Notable credit(s)
The 7.30 Report
60 Minutes
Dorothy Horsfield
ChildrenChloe Lyneham, Joel Lyneham, Mathew Lyneham

Paul Lyneham (13 August 1945[1] - 24 November 2000[2]) was an Australian journalist, commentator and television presenter. Lyneham was born in Melbourne[3] in 1945, growing up there and in Canberra[1] where he graduated from the Australian National University.[1] During his time as a student he was the lead vocalist in the band The Bitter Lemons which recorded the independently released single "Canberra Blues" in 1965.[4][5]

He worked as a journalist at The Australian and The Canberra Times newspapers before joining the ABC in 1969 and spending a period of time as London, UK correspondent.[3] Whilst in London, Lyneham met the author Dorothy Horsfield, with whom he went on to have three children.[6] Lyneham joined commercial television, working for Channel Seven as a foreign correspondent including reporting on the Falklands War. After returning to Australia Lyneham worked on Sydney radio station 2BL with his close friend Andrew Olle. He also reported for The 7.30 Report before joining Channel Nine and 60 Minutes.[1]

Death

Lyneham died of lung cancer on 24 November 2000[2] at Canberra.[1] On 20 February 2002 then-Federal Treasurer Peter Costello launched the biography of Lyneham, Paul Lyneham - A Memoir, written by his widow Dorothy Horsfield,[7] at the National Press Club, Canberra.[8] Annually since 2002, the National Press Club has also awarded the Paul Lyneham Award for excellence in journalism with only members of the federal parliamentary press gallery being eligible for the award.[9]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e "Papers of Paul Lyneham, 1999-2002 [manuscript] | National Library of Australia". Catalogue.nla.gov.au. Retrieved 2011.
  2. ^ a b "7.30 Report - 24/11/2000: Lyneham remembered for humour and hard questions". Australia: ABC. 24 November 2000. Retrieved 2011.
  3. ^ a b [1] Archived 15 October 2009 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "RareCollections: Australian cities and towns in song". ABC Canberra. 20 June 2011.
  5. ^ Marks, Ian D.; McIntyre, Iain (2011). Wild about You!: The Sixties Beat Explosion in Australia and New Zealand. Verse Chorus Press. p. 222. ISBN 9781891241284.
  6. ^ "Life Matters - 27 May 2002 - First Person - Paul Lyneham: A Memoir - Ep 6". Abc.gov.au. 27 May 2002. Archived from the original on 29 September 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  7. ^ "First Person - Life Matters - 30/5/2002: First Person - Paul Lyneham: A Memoir - Ep 9". Australia: ABC. 30 May 2002. Retrieved 2011.
  8. ^ Peter Costello. "Speeches - Launch of "Paul Lyneham - A Memoir", National Press Club [20/02/2002]". Treasurer.gov.au. Retrieved 2011.
  9. ^ [2] Archived 15 October 2009 at the Wayback Machine

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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