Neon Pop
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Neon Pop

Neon pop (short for neon pop punk)[1][2] is a subgenre of pop punk that makes notable use of synthesizers.

History and Characteristics

Some emo pop and pop punk groups prior to the labelling of neon pop used synthesizers in their music such as The Get Up Kids,[3]Motion City Soundtrack,[4] and Blink-182.[5][6]

Alternative Press writer Tyler Sharp wrote that by the late 2000s, pop punk had taken "on a new, synth-laden face."[7] While this wasn't the first instance that "a band decided to put fuzzy keys over their chord progressions, but it was a time when that formula was perfected."[7] Kika Chatterjee of Alternative Press added that the late 2000s "brought in glowing synths and poppy melodies that shifted the entire definition of [pop punk]", giving it the "neon" moniker.[8] Sharp listed songs by Cobra Starship, the Secret Handshake,[7]the Maine, and Forever the Sickest Kids, among others[9] as songs "from pop punk's neon era."[7] In addition, Chatterjee listed songs by the Cab, A Rocket to the Moon and Sing It Loud, among others.[8] Sharp noted that Forever the Sickest Kids' debut album Underdog Alma Mater (2008) was "a big moment" for the genre.[9]

Alternative Press writer Kika Chatterjee classed Cute Is What We Aim For's "The Curse of Curves", "Teasing to Please (Left Side, Strong Side)" and "There's a Class for This" as "instant classics of the mid-2000s neon-pop genre explosion."[10]Babe Talk stated that the band the Maine formed "during the neon pop era of music in 2007".[11]

While premiering a video for Kid Cadaver, Alternative Press mentioned that "If neon pop-punk had a new wave revival, this trio would likely lead the pack."[12]

References

  1. ^ Kraus, Brian (March 29, 2015). "Aspire turn up with neon pop-punk on "Break Down These Walls"". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved 2015. 
  2. ^ Kraus, Brian (April 11, 2015). "Aspire rep neon pop-punk, rap and electronics on 'Make Your Move' (stream)". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved 2015. 
  3. ^ "There Are Rules (Bonus Track Version) by The Get Up Kids on Apple Music". January 25, 2011. Retrieved 2018. 
  4. ^ "Motion City Soundtrack - Vue Weekly". vueweekly.com. Retrieved 2018. 
  5. ^ "Blink-182 Celebrate Longevity With '80s-Sounding 'Always'". Retrieved 2018. 
  6. ^ Shooman, Joe (June 24, 2010). Blink-182: The Bands, The Breakdown & The Return. Independent Music Press. p. 123. ISBN 978-1-906191-10-8. 
  7. ^ a b c d Sharp, Tyler (May 17, 2016). "12 neon pop-punk songs you've already forgotten about". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. p. 1. Retrieved 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Chatterjee, Kika (September 9, 2017). "20 neon pop-punk songs you probably forgot". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved 2017. 
  9. ^ a b Sharp, Tyler (May 17, 2016). "12 neon pop-punk songs you've already forgotten about". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. p. 2. Retrieved 2016. 
  10. ^ Sharp, Tyler; Ryken, Atreyue; Ralph, Caitlyn; Chatterjee, Kika (January 19, 2016). "20 albums we can't believe turn 10 this year". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved 2016. 
  11. ^ Oli (September 8, 2015). "Showcase Interview: The Maine". Babetalk.tv. Retrieved 2018. 
  12. ^ Sharp, Tyler (November 11, 2015). "Kid Cadaver introduce new wave of neon pop-punk with "Keep Well" (exclusive)". Alternative Press. Alternative Press Magazine, Inc. Retrieved 2016. 

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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