Natasha Romanoff (Marvel Cinematic Universe)
Get Natasha Romanoff Marvel Cinematic Universe essential facts below. View Videos or join the Natasha Romanoff Marvel Cinematic Universe discussion. Add Natasha Romanoff Marvel Cinematic Universe to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Natasha Romanoff Marvel Cinematic Universe

Natasha Romanoff
Marvel Cinematic Universe character
Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow.jpg
Scarlett Johansson as Natasha Romanoff in Iron Man 2
First appearanceIron Man 2 (2010)
Created by
Portrayed byScarlett Johansson
Information
Full nameNatasha Romanoff
Affiliation
NationalityRussian

Natasha Romanoff is a fictional character portrayed by Scarlett Johansson in the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) film franchise--based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name--sometimes known by her alter ego, Black Widow. Romanoff is a spy and an expert hand-to-hand combatant, trained in the Red Room from childhood. She eventually becomes part of the counter-terrorism agency S.H.I.E.L.D.(Strategic Homeland Intervention Enforcement and Logistics Division),through which the character was introduced to the franchise in Iron Man 2, and then of the Avengers, defending her teammates and the Earth against various threats. In 2020, the character will headline her own film, Black Widow.

Concept, creation, and casting

The Black Widow was initially created as a comic book character named Natasha Romanova, first appearing as a recurring, non-costumed, Russian-spy antagonist in the feature "Iron Man", beginning in Tales of Suspense #52 (April 1964). Five issues later, she recruits the besotted costumed archer and later superhero Hawkeye to her cause. Her government later supplies her with her first Black Widow costume and high-tech weaponry, but she eventually defects to the United States after appearing, temporarily brainwashed against the U.S., in the superhero-team series The Avengers #29 (July 1966). The Widow later becomes a recurring ally of the team before officially becoming its sixteenth member many years later. Her look was substantially revised in The Amazing Spider-Man #86 (July 1970), with shoulder-length red hair (instead of her former short black hair), a skintight black costume, and wristbands which fired spider threads.[1]

In 2004, Lionsgate acquired the film rights for Black Widow,[2] and in April announced that a Black Widow motion picture, featuring the Natasha Romanova version, was in the script stage by screenwriter-director David Hayter, with Avi Arad producing.[3][4] By June 2006, Lionsgate had dropped the project, and the rights to the character reverted to Marvel.[5] Hayter and Marvel tried getting another financier to develop the project, but Hayter "never felt comfortable that we had found a place that was willing to take the movie, and the character, seriously." This left Hayter "heartbroken", but he hoped the film would be made "some day".[6]

In January 2009, Marvel entered early talks with Emily Blunt to play Black Widow in Iron Man 2,[7] though she was unable to take the role due to a previous commitment to star in Gulliver's Travels.[8] In March 2009, Scarlett Johansson signed on to play Natasha Romanoff / Black Widow, with her deal including options for multiple films.[9]

In March 2009, actress Scarlett Johansson replaced Emily Blunt, who had previously been cast to portraying Natasha Romanoff in Iron Man 2, a deal that subsequently attached Johansson to The Avengers.[10] Johansson made her debut appearance as Romanoff in Iron Man 2.[11] She was cast after a scheduling conflict forced Emily Blunt to drop out of the part.[12] Johansson then reprised the role in The Avengers (2012),[13][14]Captain America: The Winter Soldier (2014),[15]Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015),[16]Captain America: Civil War (2016),[17][18][19][20]Avengers: Infinity War (2018)[21][22]Captain Marvel (in a brief mid-credits appearance),[23] and in a leading role in Avengers: Endgame (2019).[24][25] After the release of Age of Ultron, Johansson revealed that the number of films on her contract had been adjusted since she first signed to match the "demand of the character", as Marvel had not anticipated the audience's "great reaction" to the character and her performance.[26]

In September 2010, while promoting the home media release of Iron Man 2, Marvel Studios President Kevin Feige indicated interest in producing a solo Black Widow film,[27] and stated that discussions with Johansson had already taken place regarding a Black Widow standalone film, but that Marvel's focus was on 2012's The Avengers.[28]

In February 2014, Feige stated that, after exploring Black Widow's past in Age of Ultron, he would like to see it explored further in a solo film, which already had development work done for it,[29][30] including a "pretty in depth" treatment by Nicole Perlman, who co-wrote Marvel's Guardians of the Galaxy (2014).[31] The following April, Johansson expressed interest in starring in a Black Widow film, and said that it would be driven by demand from the audience.[32] That July, Hayter expressed interest in reviving the project for Marvel,[33] and the following month, director Neil Marshall stated that he "would love to do a Black Widow film," saying he felt the character was "really interesting [given] she doesn't have any superpowers, she just has extraordinary skills, and the world that she comes from, being this ex-K.G.B. assassin, I find that really fascinating."[34] In April 2015, Johansson spoke more on the possibility of a solo Black Widow film, seeing the potential to explore the different "layers" of her depicted in the different films so far, but also stating that "right now I think this character is used well in this part of the universe".[26] While promoting Captain America: Civil War the next April, Feige noted that due to the announced schedule of films, any potential Black Widow film would be four or five years away.[35] He added that Marvel was "creatively and emotionally" committed to making a Black Widow film eventually.[36]

In July 2016, Joss Whedon, the director of The Avengers and Avengers: Age of Ultron, stated that he was open to directing a Black Widow film, feeling he could make "a spy thriller. Like really do a good, paranoid, 'John le Carré on crack' sort of thing."[37] In October, Johansson discussed the potential film being a prequel, saying, "you can bring it back to Russia. You could explore the Widow program. There's all kinds of stuff that you could do with it." She did caution she may not want to "wear a skin-tight catsuit" for much longer.[38] The next February, Johansson said that she would dedicate herself to making any potential Black Widow film "amazing. It would have to be the best version that movie could possibly be. Otherwise, I would never do it ... [it would] have to be its own standalone and its own style and its own story."[39] Following the development work done and the public support for a Black Widow film to be made, Marvel ultimately decided that the "best time to move forward with the project" would be at the beginning of the "latest phase" of the MCU in 2020.[40]

In January 2018, Jac Schaeffer was hired to write the script.[41] That July, Cate Shortland was hired to direct.[42] Marvel sought a female director for the project, part of a priority push by major film studios to hire female directors for franchises.[43][44]Cate Shortland had the backing of Johansson, a fan of the director's previous female-starring film Lore (2012), and was hired to direct Black Widow.[44]The Hollywood Reporter reported in October 2018 that Johansson would earn $15 million to appear in the film, an increase from the "low-seven figure salary" she earned for starring in The Avengers. The $15 million was equal to what Chris Evans and Chris Hemsworth each earned in Captain America: Civil War, Thor: Ragnarok, Avengers: Infinity War, and Avengers: Endgame. Despite The Hollywood Reporter confirming the amount from "multiple knowledgable sources", Marvel Studios disputed the accuracy of the numbers while stating that they "never publicly disclose salaries or deal terms."[45]

Characterization

Scarlett Johansson speaking on the Black Widow panel at the 2019 San Diego Comic-Con International in San Diego, California.

In Iron Man 2, Romanoff is introduced as Natalie Rushman, an undercover spy for S.H.I.E.L.D. posing as Stark's new assistant. Johansson dyed her hair red before she landed the part, hoping that it would help convince Favreau that she was right for the role.[46] Johansson said that she chose the role because "the Black Widow character resonated with me... [She] is a superhero, but she's also human. She's small, but she's strong... She is dark and has faced death so many times that she has a deep perspective on the value of life... It's hard not to admire her."[47] She stated that she had "a bit of a freak-out moment" when she first saw the cat-suit.[48] When asked about fighting in the costume, Johansson responded "a big part of me is like 'can I move in this? Can I run in it? Can I like throw myself over things with this?' And I think just the prep, you just have to put in the hours. That's what I realized is that just putting in the hours and doing the training and repetition and basically just befriending the stunt team and spending all day, every day, just over and over and over and over until you sell it."[48]

In The Avengers, the character's close friendship with Clint Barton is indicated, about which Johansson said, "Our characters have a long history. They've fought together for a long time in a lot of battles in many different countries. We're the two members of this avenging group who are skilled warriors - we have no superpowers. Black Widow is definitely one of the team, though. She's not in the cast simply to be a romantic foil or eye candy. She's there to fight, so I never felt like I was the only girl. We all have our various skills and it feels equal".[49] Regarding her training, Johansson said, "Even though Iron Man 2 was 'one-for-them,' I'd never done anything like that before. I'd never been physically driven in something, or a part of something so big. For The Avengers, I've spent so many months training with our stunt team, and fighting all the other actors, it's crazy. I do nothing but fight--all the time."[50] Johansson earned $4-6 million for the film.[51]

In Captain America: The Winter Soldier, Screenwriter Christopher Markus said that Black Widow was a "great contrast" to Captain America, describing her as "incredibly modern, not very reverent, and just very straightforward whereas Steve is, you know a man from the 40s. He's not a boy scout, but he is reserved and has a moral center, whereas her moral center moves."[52] The Russos added, "She's a character who lies for a living. That's what she does. He's a character who tells the truth. Give them a problem and they'll have different ways of approaching it. She's pushing him to modernize, and he's pushing her to add a certain level of integrity to her life."[53] When asked about Romanoff's relationship with Rogers, Johansson responded, "By a series of unfortunate encounters, they will be in a situation in which their friendship becomes more intimate. They share many similarities because they live on the defensive without relying on anyone. Also, the two have been working for the government throughout their professional careers. With their friendship they begin to question what they want and what is their true identity."[54]

Producer Kevin Feige stated that more of the character's backstory is explored in Avengers: Age of Ultron.[55] Johansson elaborated, "In Avengers 2 we go back... we definitely learn more about Widow's backstory, and we get to find out how she became the person you see. All of these characters have deep, dark pasts, and I think that the past catches up to some of us a little bit."[56] Regarding where the film picks up Widow's story, Johansson felt it was a continuation of what was seen for her character in The Winter Soldier, with the fact that "'[Widow] never made an active choice. [She's] a product of other people's imposition.' That's going to catch up with her. That's bound to have a huge effect. There's got to be a result of that realization... You'll see her actively making some choices in her life, for better or worse."[57] A mixture of close-ups, concealing costumes, stunt doubles and visual effects were used to help hide Johansson's pregnancy during filming.[58]

Anthony Russo noted Romanoff's torn allegiances in Captain America: Civil War, saying "her head is with Tony's side of things, but her heart is with Cap in a lot of ways."[59] Johansson added that Romanoff is "looking to strategize her position, putting herself in a place where she is able to let the powers that be fight it out" in order for her to "have a better perspective of what's really going on".[60] Describing her character's situation after the events of Avengers: Age of Ultron, Johansson said, "I think that the Widow's past will always haunt her. She's trying to move forward, she's trying to pick up the pieces of her life".[61] She also said that Romanoff is at a point in her life where she can make choices herself, without having others have a hand in the decision process.[62] On the continuation of the relationship between Romanoff and Rogers from The Winter Soldier, Joe Russo said that they wanted to "test it" by having Romanoff point out to Rogers the mistakes the team have made and convince him "that it might not be as black and white as he sees it" and that the Avengers must "find a way to work within the system so that [they] aren't disbanded".[59]

By the events of Infinity War, Johansson said that Romanoff's situation following Captain America: Civil War has been "a dark time. I wouldn't say that my character has been particularly hopeful, but I think she's hardened even more than she probably was before".[63] At the beginning of Avengers: Endgame, Romanoff continues to command several teams from around the galaxy in the Avengers headquarters, which Joe Russo explained was stemmed from her inability to move on from their failure to stop Thanos, saying, "she's doing everything she can to try and hold the community together...She's the watcher on the wall still."[64] On the decision for Romanoff to sacrifice herself for Barton to acquire the Soul Stone to bring back everyone, Joe Russo stated that it was part of a larger theme exploring the desire to sacrifice, compared to the desire to protect in Infinity War; he says, "When she gets to that [Soul Stone] scene, I think she understands that the only way to bring the community back is for her to sacrifice herself."[64] McFeely stated, "Her journey, in our minds, had come to an end if she could get the Avengers back. She comes from such an abusive, terrible, mind-control background, so when she gets to Vormir and she has a chance to get the family back, that's a thing she would trade for."[65] To prepare for the film, Johansson underwent a high-intensity workout regimen, which included plyometrics, Olympic weightlifting and gymnastics, as well as a time-restricted eating diet; all are under the supervision of her longtime trainer, Eric Johnson, with whom she had worked since Iron Man 2 (2010), the film which introduced her character.[66]

Johansson described the film, Black Widow as "an opportunity to explore the Widow as a woman who has come into her own and is making independent and active choices for herself, probably for once in her life".[67]

Character biography

Early life

Born in Russia in 1984, Natasha Romanoff was trained as a spy in a secretive academy called the Red Room which involved training as a ballerina as a cover,[68] as well as the eventual sterilization of the students.[69] Eventually, Clint Barton is sent to kill Romanoff, but instead chooses to spare her life and recruit her to S.H.I.E.L.D., enabling Romanoff to escapes her previous life as an assassin.

Undercover for S.H.I.E.L.D.

After Tony Stark publicly becomes Iron Man and appoints his personal assistant Pepper Potts as CEO of Stark Industries, he hires Stark employee Natalie Rushman to replace Potts as his personal assistant, unaware that Rushman is actually Romanoff undercover. Nick Fury, director of S.H.I.E.L.D., later reveals this to Stark, and Romanoff then helps Stark to thwart the plans of villains Justin Hammer and Ivan Vanko, the latter of whom has remotely taken control of an army of military drones and the armor of Stark's friend James Rhodes. Romanoff successfully defeats Hammer's security forces to return control of the Rhodes' armor, allowing Stark and Rhodes to defeat Vanko and the drones.

Battle of New York

Some months later, while Loki begins his attack on Earth, Romanoff is being held prisoner and interrogated by Russians. Agent Phil Coulson is able to contact Romanoff to inform her that Loki has compromised Barton, and Romanoff promptly overcomes her captors, whom she had only allowed to capture her as a ploy to extract information. Romanoff recruits Bruce Banner from his seclusion in Kolkata to use his expertise to track the gamma signature of Loki's scepter. On board S.H.I.E.L.D.'s helicarrier, she tricks Loki into revealing his plan to cause Banner to become the Hulk, but is too late, as Barton and Loki's other possessed agents attack the Helicarrier, causing Banner to transform into the Hulk and pursue Romanoff until he is distracted by Thor. Romanoff reluctantly fights Barton, and knocks him unconscious, breaking Loki's mind control. Rogers, Stark, Romanoff, Barton, Thor, and Hulk then rally in defense of Loki's next target, New York City.

Working with Captain America

Two years after the Battle of New York, Romanoff and Rogers are sent with S.H.I.E.L.D.'s counter-terrorism S.T.R.I.K.E. team to free hostages aboard a S.H.I.E.L.D. vessel from Georges Batroc and his mercenaries. Mid-mission, Rogers discovers Romanoff has another agenda: to extract data from the ship's computers for Fury. After an attempt on Fury's life, Rogers becomes a fugitive hunted by S.T.R.I.K.E., and meets with Romanoff. Using data in the flash drive, they discover a secret S.H.I.E.L.D. bunker in New Jersey, where they activate a supercomputer containing the preserved consciousness of Arnim Zola. Zola reveals that ever since S.H.I.E.L.D. was founded after World War II, Hydra has secretly operated within its ranks, sowing global chaos with the objective of making humanity surrender its freedom in exchange for security. The pair narrowly escape death when a S.H.I.E.L.D. missile destroys the bunker, and realize that Secretary of Internal Security Alexander Pierce is Hydra's leader within S.H.I.E.L.D. To prevent Hydra from using helicarriers to attack the world's superheroes, Romanoff, disguised as a World Security Council member, disarms Pierce. Fury arrives and forces Pierce to unlock S.H.I.E.L.D.'s database so that Romanoff can leak classified information, exposing Hydra to the public. Romanoff later appears before a Senate subcommittee, while Fury, under the cover of his apparent death, heads to Eastern Europe in pursuit of Hydra's remaining cells.

Battle of Sokovia and Civil War

Romanoff continues to work with the Avengers, helping them to attack a Hydra facility where they recover Loki's scepter. She becomes romantically involved with Banner, but he and Stark accidentally create Ultron, who captures Romanoff and takes her to Sokovia. Rescued by Banner, she pushes him off a ledge to force his transformation into the Hulk to aid in the battle against Ultron, an act which later influences Hulk to leave Earth altogether. Sokovia is destroyed in the battle, leading to the passage of the Sokovia Accords, over which Tony Stark and Steve Rogers have a falling out. Romanoff initially sides with Stark's team, accompanying them to battle Rogers and his allies at Leipzig Airport, but Romanoff then switches sides to allow Rogers to escape with Bucky Barnes.

The Infinity War

Romanoff later reconnects with a fugitive Rogers, and several years later, when Thanos sends his minions to retrieve Infinity Stones on Earth, she, Rogers, and Sam Wilson arrive in Scotland in time to defend Wanda Maximoff and Vision from an attack by members of the Black Order. She travels to Wakanda to aid in the battle against the forces of Thanos, but the defenders are unable to prevent Thanos from obtaining the stones and using them to eliminate half of all life in the Universe. Romanoff survives the snap, and travels with the newly arrived Captain Marvel and other surviving Avengers to Thanos' garden planet to attempt to recover the Infinity Stones, only to learn that Thanos has already destroyed them. Romanoff then returns to Earth to continue to lead the remnants of S.H.I.E.L.D. and the Avengers from the former Avengers headquarters in upstate New York.

Five years later, Scott Lang comes to the Avengers headquarters and informs Romanoff and Rogers that he has been trapped in the quantum realm, where time passes differently, affording a means to steal the Infinity Stones from the past and bring back those who were destroyed by Thanos. After working to recruit Stark and Banner to the cause, Romanoff travels to a past version of the planet Vormir with Barton. After an initial scuffle with him over the decision regarding whom to sacrifice for the Soul Stone, Romanoff sacrifices her life so that Barton can obtain the Soul Stone and eventually return to his family. The original five members following the mission later mourn her death and honor her sacrifice, with Banner finally using the Stark Gauntlet to bring the disintegrated back to life. Banner later notes that he had tried at that time to also bring Romanoff back, and had been unable to.

Differences from the comics

Romanoff in the MCU is a founding member of the Avengers, while in the comics she is a much later addition, and initially an antagonist to the team. This version also showed a romance with Bruce Banner that was mostly explored in Age of Ultron but hinted at in later and previous films. This version is also very close to Clint Barton's family, unlike in the Ultimate Comics where she murders each member.

Reception

David Edelstein of New York Magazine described the presence of the female leads in Iron Man 2 as "a gam-off between Gwyneth Paltrow and Scarlett Johansson in which Paltrow wins on length and then disappears in the glare of her opponent's headlights".[70]Vanity Fair notes that her entrance in that film "famously chose to focus on her desirability rather than her staggering combat skills".[71]

A Daily Beast review of the character's role in Age of Ultron lamented that the character had been made to "function as a cog that services the storylines" of the male characters.[68]Vanity Fair described the development of the character across the films as "a trajectory that's been as all over the map as Black Widow's varying hairstyles", stating that she "spent her years in the MCU as an accessory to narratives foregrounding other heroes".[71]

Vox notes that in Avengers: Endgame, "Johansson takes Romanoff -- usually the dependable, no-frills assassin -- into quiet, stoic suffering",[72] while Vanity Fair laments that the film "never gives her or her death room to breathe".[71]

Accolades

Year Film Award Category Result Ref(s)
2010 Iron Man 2 Teen Choice Awards Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Nominated [73]
Scream Awards Best Science Fiction Actress Won [74]
2011 Saturn Awards Best Supporting Actress Nominated [75]
2012 The Avengers Teen Choice Awards Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Nominated [76]
Choice Summer Movie Star: Female Nominated
2013 Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [77]
Favorite Butt-Kicker Nominated
People's Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [78]
Favorite Face of Heroism Nominated
Favorite On-Screen Chemistry (with Jeremy Renner) Nominated
MTV Movie Awards Best Fight (with cast) Won [79]
2014 Captain America: The Winter Soldier Teen Choice Awards Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Nominated [80]
Choice Movie: Liplock (with Chris Evans) Nominated
2015 People's Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [81]
Favorite Movie Duo (with Chris Evans) Nominated
Favorite Action Movie Actress Nominated
Saturn Awards Saturn Award for Best Supporting Actress Nominated [82]
MTV Movie Awards Best Kiss (with Chris Evans) Nominated [83]
Avengers: Age of Ultron Teen Choice Awards Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Nominated [84]
2016 People's Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [85]
Favorite Action Movie Actress Nominated
Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [86]
Captain America: Civil War Teen Choice Awards Choice Movie Actress: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Nominated [87]
Choice Movie: Chemistry (with cast) Nominated [88]
Critics' Choice Awards Best Actress in an Action Movie Nominated [89]
2017 People's Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [90]
Favorite Action Movie Actress Nominated
Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [91]
Favorite Butt-Kicker Nominated
#Squad (with cast) Nominated
Saturn Awards Best Supporting Actress Nominated [92]
2018 Avengers: Infinity War MTV Movie & TV Awards Best Fight (with cast) Nominated [93]
Teen Choice Awards Choice Action Movie Actress Won [94]
People's Choice Awards Female Movie Star of 2018 Won [95]
2019 Kids' Choice Awards Favorite Movie Actress Nominated [96]
Favorite Superhero Nominated
Avengers: Endgame Teen Choice Awards Choice Action Movie Actress Won [97]
Saturn Awards Best Supporting Actress Nominated [98]
People's Choice Awards Female Movie Star of 2019 Nominated [99]

References

  1. ^ Carson, Lex (December 2010). "Daredevil and the Black Widow: A Swinging Couple of Crimefighters". Back Issue!. TwoMorrows Publishing (45): 31-38.
  2. ^ "Lions Gate & Marvel Sign Iron Fist & Black Widow Deal". Superhero Hype!. February 26, 2004. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved 2014.
  3. ^ "David Hayter to Direct The Black Widow!". Superhero Hype!. April 28, 2004. Archived from the original on September 22, 2015. Retrieved 2014.
  4. ^ "Lions Gate press release (March 2, 2004)". Movies.about.com. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  5. ^ Stax (June 5, 2006). "IGN.com (June 5, 2006): "The Word on Black Widow"". IGN. Retrieved 2011.
  6. ^ Weinberg, Scott (June 6, 2006). "Lionsgate Squashes the "Black Widow"". Rotten Tomatoes. Archived from the original on December 4, 2012. Retrieved 2014.
  7. ^ Fleming Jr., Michael (January 14, 2009). "Emily Blunt rumored for 'Iron Man 2'". Variety. Archived from the original on February 8, 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  8. ^ Moore, Roger (February 25, 2009). "Emily Blunt on losing Black Widow...". The Orlando Sentinel. Archived from the original on June 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  9. ^ Finke, Nikki (March 11, 2009). "Another 'Iron Man 2' Deal: Scarlett Johannson To Replace Emily Blunt As Black Widow For Lousy Lowball Money". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on August 29, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  10. ^ Finke, Nikki (March 11, 2009). "Another 'Iron Man 2' Deal: Scarlett Johansson to Replace Emily Blunt as Black Widow for Lousy Lowball Money". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on April 25, 2011. Retrieved 2010.
  11. ^ Finke, Nikki (March 11, 2009). "Another Iron Man 2 Deal". Nikki Finke's Deadline Hollywood Daily. Retrieved 2009.
  12. ^ Sperling, Nicole (February 13, 2009). "'Iron Man 2': Scarlett Johansson to replace Emily Blunt as Black Widow?". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  13. ^ "Marvel-ous Star Wattage: Actors Assemble For Comic-Con Panel Including 'The Avengers', 'Captain America', & 'Thor'". Deadline Hollywood. July 24, 2010. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved 2010.
  14. ^ "Marvel-ous Star Wattage: Actors Assemble For Comic-Con Panel Including 'The Avengers', 'Captain America', & 'Thor'". Deadline Hollywood. July 24, 2010. Archived from the original on July 5, 2011. Retrieved 2010.
  15. ^ Fleming, Mike (October 2, 2012). "Five Actresses Testing For 'Captain America 2' Role; Black Widow Might Drop By As Well". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on October 2, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  16. ^ Maresca, Rachel (September 29, 2013). "Scarlett Johansson flaunts curves in new magazine photo shoot, reveals details on 'The Avengers' sequel". New York Daily News. Archived from the original on September 29, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  17. ^ Arrant, Chris (January 15, 2015). "Captain America: Civil War Directors: Black Widow Will Be Back, More". Newsarama. Archived from the original on January 19, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  18. ^ White, Brett (July 25, 2013). "'Avengers: Age Of Ultron' To Feature Lots More Black Widow And Hawkeye". MTV. Retrieved 2013.
  19. ^ Maresca, Rachel (September 29, 2013). "Scarlett Johansson flaunts curves in new magazine photo shoot, reveals details on 'The Avengers' sequel". Daily News. Archived from the original on September 29, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  20. ^ Fleming, Jr, Mike (November 14, 2014). "Daniel Bruhl To Play Villain In 'Captain America: Civill War'". Deadline.
  21. ^ Welch, Alex (June 7, 2017). "Avengers: Infinity War - Black Panther Actor Starts Filming". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on June 8, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  22. ^ Heller, Corinne (November 29, 2017). "Ranking the Avengers: Infinity War, Makeovers, From Captain America's Beard to Blonde Black Widow". E! News.
  23. ^ Robinson, Tasha (March 7, 2019). "One of Captain Marvel's post-credits scenes is great news for Avengers: Endgame". The Verge. Vox Media. Retrieved 2019.
  24. ^ Mithaiwala, Mansoor (October 28, 2017). "Robert Downey Jr. Announces Avengers 4 Return". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on November 4, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  25. ^ Welch, Alex (August 22, 2017). "Black Widow Heads to Japan in Avengers 4 Set Photos". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on August 23, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  26. ^ a b Chitwood, Adam (April 15, 2015). "BLACK WIDOW Movie: Scarlett Johansson and Kevin Feige Have Discussed a Series of Films". Collider. Archived from the original on April 16, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  27. ^ Pirrello, Phil (September 22, 2010). "Black Widow: The Movie?". IGN. Retrieved 2011.
  28. ^ Pirrello, Phil (September 22, 2010). "Black Widow: The Movie?". IGN. Archived from the original on October 31, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  29. ^ Couto, Anthony (February 12, 2014). "Feige: Black Widow's Past to be Explored in Avengers 2 and Possible Solo Film". IGN. Archived from the original on February 23, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  30. ^ Couto, Anthony (February 12, 2014). "Feige: Black Widow's Past to be Explored in Avengers 2 and Possible Solo Film". IGN. Archived from the original on February 13, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  31. ^ West, Rachel (July 25, 2014). "Screenwriter Nicole Perlman gives us the scoop on Guardians, Marvel, and more!". Cineplex. Archived from the original on July 28, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  32. ^ Keyes, Rob (April 2014). "Captain America 2 Interview: Scarlett Johansson Talks 'Black Widow' Solo Film". Screen Rant. Archived from the original on July 27, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  33. ^ "X-Men's David Hayter wants to revive Black Widow". Digital Spy. July 21, 2014. Archived from the original on July 23, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  34. ^ Robinson, Joanna (August 21, 2014). "Game of Thrones Big-Battle Director Neil Marshall Either Wants to Direct a Black Widow Movie or Unleash Those Dragons". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on August 26, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  35. ^ Davis, Erik (April 11, 2016). "Here's When We'll Know Who's Starring in And Directing Marvel's 'Captain Marvel' Movie". Fandango. Archived from the original on April 13, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  36. ^ Fleming Jr., Mike (May 6, 2016). "Kevin Feige On 'Captain America: Civil War' And All Things Marvel - Deadline Q&A". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on May 6, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  37. ^ Yehl, Joshua (July 23, 2016). "Comic-Con 2016: Joss Whedon Would Direct a Black Widow Movie if Marvel Asked". IGN. Archived from the original on July 25, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  38. ^ Setoodeh, Ramin (October 12, 2016). "Scarlett Johansson on Black Widow Movie, 'The Avengers' and Donald Trump". Variety. Archived from the original on October 13, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  39. ^ Russell, Bradley (February 10, 2017). "The Black Widow movie "should be done" says Scarlett Johansson". GamesRadar+. Archived from the original on February 11, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  40. ^ Kroll, Justin (March 18, 2019). "Scarlett Johansson's 'Black Widow' Movie Adds Florence Pugh". Variety. Archived from the original on March 19, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  41. ^ Kroll, Justin (January 10, 2018). "Marvel's Standalone 'Black Widow' Movie Gains Momentum With Jac Schaeffer Writing". Variety. Archived from the original on January 11, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  42. ^ Kit, Borys (July 12, 2018). "'Black Widow' Movie Finds Director in Cate Shortland (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 12, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  43. ^ Kit, Borys (April 26, 2018). "'Jessica Jones' Director in Talks to Helm 'Star Trek 4'". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on April 27, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  44. ^ a b Kit, Borys (July 12, 2018). "'Black Widow' Movie Finds Director in Cate Shortland (Exclusive)". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on July 13, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  45. ^ Siegel, Tatiana; Kit, Borys (October 11, 2018). "Scarlett Johansson Lands $15 Million Payday for Black Widow Movie". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  46. ^ Murray, Rebecca. "Scarlett Johansson Interview – 'Iron Man 2'". About.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  47. ^ Hirschberg, Lynn (February 9, 2015). "Scarlett Johansson Is Nobody's Baby". W. Archived from the original on February 17, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  48. ^ a b Weintraub, Steve (July 28, 2009). "Scarlett Johansson Comic-Con Interview IRON MAN 2". Collider.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  49. ^ Adamek, Pauline (January-February 2012). "Avengers Assemble!". Filmink. FKP International Exports: 70-75.
  50. ^ Biskind, Peter (December 2011). "A Study in Scarlett". Vanity Fair. Archived from the original on November 21, 2011. Retrieved 2011.
  51. ^ Belloni, Matthew (May 15, 2012). "Marvel Moolah: Robert Downey Jr. 'Avengers' Pay Set to Hit $50 Million". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  52. ^ Chitwood, Adam (April 12, 2013). "Christopher Markus and Stephen McFeely Talk Captain America 2 and Thor 2; Reveal Cap 2 Has Faster Pace & Fewer Flashbacks Than Initially Planned". Collider.com. Archived from the original on April 14, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  53. ^ Goldman, Eric (March 6, 2014). "The Winter Soldier: Has America Changed Too Much for Captain America?". IGN. Archived from the original on March 11, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  54. ^ Lussier, Germain; Riefe, Jordan (September 29, 2013). "Scarlett Johansson Dishes on 'Top Chef' and Porn". Refinery29.com. Archived from the original on October 6, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  55. ^ Couto, Anthony (February 12, 2014). "Feige: Black Widow's Past to be Explored in Avengers 2 and Possible Solo Film". IGN. Archived from the original on February 13, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  56. ^ Johannson, Scarlett (March 19, 2014). Scarlett Johansson Talks The Avengers: Age of Ultron (video). IGN. Retrieved 2014.
  57. ^ Cornet, Roth (July 17, 2014). "Avengers: Age Of Ultron Scarlett Johansson Talks Black Widow's Greatest Power". IGN. Archived from the original on July 18, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  58. ^ Breznican, Anthony (July 18, 2014). "How 'Avengers: Age of Ultron' will hide Scarlett Johansson's pregnancy". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on July 19, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  59. ^ a b Hewitt, Chris (November 25, 2015). "Captain America: Civil War trailer breakdown". Empire. Archived from the original on November 25, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  60. ^ Breznican, Anthony (December 3, 2015). "Captain America: Civil War star Scarlett Johansson on the scrutiny of Black Widow". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 4, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  61. ^ "Captain America: Civil War - Scarlett Johansson Teases Her Role In Captain America: Civil War". IGN. April 21, 2015. Archived from the original on April 23, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  62. ^ Breznican, Anthony (December 3, 2015). "Captain America: Civil War star Scarlett Johansson on the scrutiny of Black Widow". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on December 4, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  63. ^ Breznican, Anthony (March 8, 2018). "Behind the scenes of Avengers: Infinity War as new heroes unite - and others will end - page 3". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on March 8, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  64. ^ a b Breznican, Anthony (May 2, 2019). "Avengers: Endgame directors defend controversial Black Widow scene". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on May 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  65. ^ Itzkoff, Dave (April 29, 2019). "'Avengers: Endgame': The Screenwriters Answer Every Question You Might Have". The New York Times. Archived from the original on May 14, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  66. ^ Romeyn, Kathryn (April 26, 2019). "Scarlett Johansson's 'Avengers' Workout: How to Get a Black Widow Body". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on May 2, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  67. ^ Boucher, Geoff (November 30, 2018). "Spider-Women, Captain Marvel & Harley Quinn: Females Fly In The Face Of Old Hollywood Perceptions". Deadline Hollywood. Archived from the original on December 1, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  68. ^ a b Stern, Marlow (May 5, 2015). "'Avengers: Age of Ultron's' Black Widow Disgrace" – via www.thedailybeast.com.
  69. ^ "Why Black Widow's sterilization scene in 'Age of Ultron' is astonishing". May 7, 2015.
  70. ^ David Edelstein (May 2, 2010). "Battle of the Rehabbed Stars". New York Magazine. Archived from the original on August 30, 2012. Retrieved 2010.
  71. ^ a b c Bradley, Laura (April 26, 2019). "How Avengers: Endgame Failed Black Widow". Vanity Fair.
  72. ^ Abad-Santosalex, Alex (April 23, 2019). "Avengers: Endgame is a Marvel miracle". Vox.
  73. ^ Soll, Lindsay (June 14, 2010). "Teen Choice Awards 2010: First Round of Nominees Announced". MTV. Archived from the original on January 8, 2016. Retrieved 2019.
  74. ^ Castillo, Michelle (October 21, 2010). "And Your 2010 Scream Awards Winners Are...". Time. Archived from the original on January 29, 2011. Retrieved 2019.
  75. ^ Bettinger, Brendan (February 23, 2011). "Inception, Let Me In, Tron, and The Walkind Dead Top the 2011 Saturn Award Nominations". Collider. Archived from the original on October 11, 2013. Retrieved 2019.
  76. ^ Chung, Gabrielle (July 22, 2012). "Teen Choice Awards 2012: Nominees and Winners (Complete List)". Celebuzz. Archived from the original on September 27, 2013. Retrieved 2019.
  77. ^ "Nickelodeon Unveils 2013 Kids' Choice Awards Nominees". PR Newswire. February 13, 2013. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. Retrieved 2019.
  78. ^ "People's Choice Awards 2013: The Complete Winners List". MTV. January 9, 2013. Archived from the original on July 15, 2014. Retrieved 2019.
  79. ^ Ellwood, Gregory (April 14, 2013). "2013 MTV Movie Awards winners and nominees - complete list". Uproxx. Archived from the original on March 18, 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  80. ^ "Teen Choice Awards 2014 Nominees Revealed!". Yahoo! Movies. June 18, 2014. Archived from the original on August 12, 2014. Retrieved 2014.
  81. ^ Blake, Emily (January 7, 2015). "People's Choice Awards 2015: The winner's list". Entertainment Weekly. Archived from the original on February 16, 2015. Retrieved 2019.
  82. ^ Foutch, Haleigh (March 3, 2015). "Interstellar and The Winter Soldier Lead Saturn Award Nominations". Collider. Archived from the original on October 28, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  83. ^ Wickman, Kase (March 4, 2015). "Here Are Your 2015 MTV Movie Awards Nominees". MTV. Archived from the original on March 5, 2015. Retrieved 2019.
  84. ^ "Teen Choice Awards 2015 Winners: Full List". Variety. August 16, 2015. Archived from the original on October 26, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  85. ^ "People's Choice Awards 2016: See the Full List of Winners Here". Billboard. January 6, 2016. Archived from the original on January 8, 2016. Retrieved 2019.
  86. ^ Grant, Stacey (February 2, 2016). "Here Are The Nominees For The 2016 Kids' Choice Awards". MTV. Archived from the original on February 4, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  87. ^ Vulpo, Mike (May 24, 2016). "Teen Choice Awards 2016 Nominations Announced: See the "First Wave" of Potential Winners". E!. Archived from the original on May 26, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  88. ^ Eliahou, Maya (June 9, 2016). "Teen Choice Awards 2016--Captain America: Civil War Leads Second Wave of Nominations". E!. Archived from the original on June 12, 2016. Retrieved 2019.
  89. ^ Kilday, Gregg (December 1, 2016). "'La La Land,' 'Arrival,' 'Moonlight' Top Critics' Choice Nominations". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on December 2, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  90. ^ Chestang, Raphael (January 18, 2017). "People's Choice Awards 2017: The Complete Winners List". Entertainment Tonight. Archived from the original on January 19, 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  91. ^ Vulpo, Mike (March 11, 2017). "Kids' Choice Awards 2017 Winners: The Complete List". E!. Archived from the original on June 25, 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  92. ^ McNary, Dave (March 2, 2017). "Saturn Awards Nominations 2017: 'Rogue One,' 'Walking Dead' Lead". Variety. Archived from the original on March 3, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  93. ^ Bell, Crystal (May 3, 2018). "2018 MTV Movie & TV Awards Nominations: See The Full List". MTV. Archived from the original on May 3, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  94. ^ "Teen Choice Awards: Winners List". The Hollywood Reporter. August 12, 2018. Archived from the original on August 13, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  95. ^ "People's Choice Awards: Complete List of Winners". The Hollywood Reporter. November 11, 2018. Archived from the original on November 12, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  96. ^ Howard, Annie (February 26, 2019). "Kids' Choice Awards: 'Avengers: Infinity War' Tops Nominees; DJ Khaled to Host". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on February 27, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  97. ^ Clarendon, Dan (August 11, 2019). "Teen Choice Awards 2019: Complete List of Winners and Nominees". Us Weekly. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  98. ^ Anderton, Ethan (September 14, 2019). "2019 Saturn Awards Winners: 'Avengers: Endgame' Dominates with Six Total Awards". /Film. Archived from the original on September 21, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  99. ^ Nordyke, Kimberly; Howard, Annie (November 10, 2019). "People's Choice Awards: 'Avengers: Endgame' Named Best Movie". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on November 11, 2019. Retrieved 2019.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Natasha_Romanoff_(Marvel_Cinematic_Universe)
 



 



 
Music Scenes