Nagoya Grampus
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Nagoya Grampus
Nagoya Grampus
Logo
Nickname(s)Grampus
Founded1939; 80 years ago (1939), as Toyota Motors SC
1992; 27 years ago (1992), as Nagoya Grampus Eight
GroundMizuho Stadium
Toyota Stadium
Capacity27,001 (Mizuho)
45,000 (Toyota)
OwnerToyota
ChairmanToyo Kato
ManagerMassimo Ficcadenti
LeagueJ1 League
201913th
WebsiteClub website
Current season

Nagoya Grampus (, Nagoya Guranpasu) (formerly known as Nagoya Grampus Eight (, Nagoya Guranpasu Eito)) is a Japanese association football club that plays in the J1 League, following promotion from the J2 League in 2017. Based in Nagoya, Aichi Prefecture and founded as the company team of the Toyota Motor Corp. in 1939, the club shares its home games between Mizuho Athletic Stadium (capacity 27,000 and the J.League's oldest-serving stadium) and the much larger Toyota Stadium (capacity 45,000).

The team had its most successful season up to 1995 when it was managed by Arsène Wenger, well known for his exploits at Arsenal. They won the Emperor's Cup and finished second in the J.League, with Dragan Stojkovi? and Gary Lineker on the team. The 1995 success was eclipsed on November 20, 2010, when the club won its first J.League trophy, under the management of Stojkovi?.[1]

The team's name was derived from the two most prominent symbols of Nagoya: the two golden grampus dolphins on the top of Nagoya Castle, and the Maru-Hachi (Circle eight), the city's official symbol.

History

JSL era

Toyota Motors SC was overshadowed by its colleague Toyota Automated Loom Works SC (founded in 1946 and which was one of the founding members of the Japan Soccer League). When Toyota ALW were relegated to regional leagues in 1968, Toyota Motor saw an opportunity to rise at their expense.[2]

In 1972 Toyota Motors were founding members of the JSL's Second Division and its inaugural champions. They remained in the JSL until the J.League's founding in 1993. They were relegated to the JSL Division 2 in 1977. After a brief return in 1987-88, they were promoted for good in 1989-90 and remained in the top flight for 26 years, until 2016.

J.League era

In 1996, future Arsenal manager Arsène Wenger led Grampus to the 1996 Emperor's Cup and a runners-up finish in the J.League, the club's best finish. The team's name "Nagoya Grampus Eight" was changed to just "Nagoya Grampus" at the start of the 2008 season.[2] In 2008, Nagoya appointed former player Dragan Stojkovi? as manager. They finished in third place and qualified for the AFC Champions League for the first time.[3] Stojkovi? has since led the club to winning the J.League in the 2010 season, featuring a squad consisting of Marcus Tulio Tanaka, Mu Kanazaki, Seigo Narazaki, Yoshizumi Ogawa, Keiji Tamada and Joshua Kennedy.[1] After a poor 2016 season, Nagoya Grampus were relegated to J2 League for the first time in their history.[4]Bo?ko Gjurovski left his post as manager.[5] On 4 January 2017, Yahiro Kazama was appointed as the club's new manager.[6] On 3 December 2017, Nagoya Grampus drew 0-0 against Avispa Fukuoka in the promotion playoff final, securing promotion back to J1 League at the first time of asking due to their higher regular season position than Avispa Fukuoka.[7]

Old Logo

Kashima Soccer Stadium curse

Since Nagoya were dealt a 5-0 defeat to the Kashima Antlers at the Kashima Soccer Stadium on 16 May in the 1993 J.League season opener, Nagoya suffered a losing streak of 22 consecutive games to the Kashima Antlers at the Kashima Soccer Stadium which included Emperor's Cup and J.League Cup games. Nagoya finally got their first victory over the Kashima Antlers at the Kashima Soccer Stadium on 23 August of the 2008 J.League season, some 15 years later.

J.League Record

Season Div. Tms. Pos. Attendance/G J.League Cup Emperor's Cup Asia
1992 - - - - Semi-final 1st round - -
1993 J1 10 9 19,858 Group Stage Quarter-final - -
1994 J1 12 11 21,842 1st round 2nd round - -
1995 J1 14 3 21,463 - Winners - -
1996 J1 16 2 21,699 Group Stage 3rd round - -
1997 J1 17 9 14,750 Semi-final 3rd round CWC Runners-up
1998 J1 18 5 13,993 Group Stage Semi-final - -
1999 J1 16 4 14,688 Semi-final Winners - -
2000 J1 16 9 14,114 Semi-final 4th round - -
2001 J1 16 5 16,974 Semi-final 3rd round CWC Quarter-final
2002 J1 16 6 16,323 Group Stage 4th round - -
2003 J1 16 7 16,768 Semi-final 4th round - -
2004 J1 16 7 15,712 Semi-final 5th round - -
2005 J1 18 14 13,288 Group Stage 5th round - -
2006 J1 18 7 14,924 Group Stage 5th round - -
2007 J1 18 11 15,585 Group Stage 5th round - -
2008 J1 18 3 16,555 Semi-final Quarter-final - -
2009 J1 18 9 15,928 Quarter-final Runners-up CL Semi-final
2010 J1 18 1 19,979 Group Stage Quarter-final -
2011 J1 18 2 16,741 Semi-final Quarter-final CL Round of 16
2012 J1 18 7 17,155 Quarter-final Quarter-final CL Round of 16
2013 J1 18 11 16,135 Group Stage 2nd round - -
2014 J1 18 10 16,734 Group Stage Quarter-final - -
2015 J1 18 9 16,240 Quarter-final 2nd round - -
2016 J1 18 16 17,729 Group Stage 2nd round - -
2017 J2 22 3 15,365 - 4th round - -
2018 J1 18 15 24,961 Group Stage 3rd round - -
2019 J1 18 13 27,612 Quarterfinal 2nd round - -
Key
  • Tms. = Number of teams
  • Pos. = Position in league
  • Attendance/G = Average league attendance
  • Source: J. League Data Site

Players

Current squad

As of 2 July 2019[8]

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Out on loan

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

Managers

Information correct as of match played 1 December 2018. Only competitive matches are counted.

Name Nat. From To P W D L GS GA %W Honours Notes
Ryuzo Hiraki  Japan 1992 1993 0 0 0 0 0 0 !--
Gordon Milne  England 1 January 1994 31 December 1994 0 0 0 0 0 0 !--
Tetsuro Miura  Japan 1 January 1995 30 June 1995 0 0 0 0 0 0 !-- (caretaker)
Arsène Wenger  France 1 July 1995 30 September 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 !-- Emperor's Cup x1
José Costa  Portugal 30 September 1996 21 November 1996 0 0 0 0 0 0 !-- (caretaker)
Carlos Queiroz  Portugal 21 November 1996 November 1997 0 0 0 0 0 0 !--
Koji Tanaka  Japan 1997 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 !--
Daniel Sanchez  France 1 January 1998 31 January 1998 0 0 0 0 0 0 !--
Mazarópi  Brazil 1999 1999 0 0 0 0 0 0 !-- (caretaker)
João Carlos  Brazil 1999 2001 0 0 0 0 0 0 !-- Emperor's Cup x1
Tetsuro Miura  Japan 2001 2001 15 7 1 7 0 0 046.67
Zdenko Verdenik  Slovenia 1 January 2002 4 August 2003 45 20 9 16 0 0 044.44
Nelsinho Baptista  Brazil 29 July 2003 20 September 2005 69 26 20 23 0 0 037.68
Hitoshi Nakata  Japan 21 September 2005 31 December 2005 10 2 1 7 0 0 020.00 (caretaker)
Sef Vergoossen  Netherlands 1 January 2006 31 December 2007 68 26 15 27 0 0 038.24
Dragan Stojkovi?  Serbia 22 January 2008 7 December 2013 204 103 42 59 0 0 050.49 J.League x1
Akira Nishino  Japan 25 December 2013 22 November 2015 87 36 21 30 135 123 041.38
Takafumi Ogura  Japan 24 November 2015 23 August 2016 32 5 8 19 30 56 015.63
Bo?ko Gjurovski  North Macedonia 23 August 2016 6 November 2016[5] 9 3 2 4 12 13 033.33 (caretaker)
Yahiro Kazama  Japan 4 January 2017[6] 23 September 2019 [9] 89 40 13 36 157 147 044.94 (Promoted)
Massimo Ficcadenti  Italy 23 September 2019[10]
  • Notes:

P - Total of played matches W - Won matches D - Drawn matches L - Lost matches GS - Goal scored GA - Goals against
%W - Percentage of matches won
? As caretaker manager Nationality is indicated by the corresponding FIFA country code(s).

Honours

Toyota Motor SC (Amateur Era)

1968, 1970
1972
1991

Nagoya Grampus (Professional Era)

Champions (1): 2010
Champions (2): 1995, 1999
Champions (2): 1996, 2011

Personnel awards

World Cup players

The following players have been selected by their country in the World Cup, while playing for Nagoya Grampus:

League history

  • T?kai Football League: 1966-71
  • Division 2 (JSL Div. 2): 1972
  • Division 1 (JSL Div. 1): 1973-77
  • Division 2 (JSL Div. 2): 1978-86
  • Division 1 (JSL Div. 1): 1987
  • Division 2 (JSL Div. 2): 1988-89
  • Division 1 (JSL Div. 1): 1990-91
  • Division 1 (J.League Div. 1): 1992-2016
  • Division 2 (J2 League): 2017
  • Division 1 (J.League Div. 1): 2018

(As of 2015): 33 seasons in the top tier, 12 seasons in the second tier and 6 seasons in the Regional Leagues.

In popular culture

In the Captain Tsubasa manga series, one character was player of Nagoya Grampus and is the goalkeeper Ken Wakashimazu which was player of Yokohama Flügels before the closing of the Yokohama team. In 2013, the midfielder Shingo Aoi wear the Nagoya Grampus jersey in a Yoichi Takahashi tribute to the 20 years of J.League.

See also

References

  1. ^ a b John Duerden (2010-11-05). "Stojkovic doing things the Wenger way". ESPNsoccernet. Retrieved .
  2. ^ a b "Club guide: Nagoya Grampus". J.League. Archived from the original on 12 August 2014. Retrieved 2015.
  3. ^ "J.League News No.40" (PDF). J.League. December 19, 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on 19 January 2010. Retrieved 2015.
  4. ^ "?(J2". nagoya-grampus.jp (in Japanese). Nagoya Grampus. 4 November 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  5. ^ a b "". nagoya-grampus.jp (in Japanese). Nagoya Grampus. 6 November 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  6. ^ a b " ". nagoya-grampus.jp (in Japanese). Nagoya Grampus. 4 January 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ "Grampus come through playoff to seal return to J.League top flight". japantimes.co.jp. Japan Times. 3 December 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  8. ^ "2019?url=http://nagoya-grampus.jp/news/pressrelease/2019/01142019-22.php". Nagoya Grampus. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ " |?|?". Nagoya Grampus (in Japanese). 2019-09-23. Retrieved .
  10. ^ "? |?|?". 2019-09-23 (in Japanese). Retrieved .

External links



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