NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship
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NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship
NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship
Details
PromotionNational Wrestling Alliance
Jim Crockett Promotions
Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling
Date establishedOctober 13, 1970
Date retiredDecember 26, 1986
Other name(s)
  • NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship

The NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship was a professional wrestling championship promoted in Jim Crockett Promotions (JCP), a territory-promotion governed by the National Wrestling Alliance (NWA). The title was only contestable by male individual wrestlers. Being a professional wrestling championship, it was not won legitimately; it was instead won via a scripted ending to a match or awarded to a wrestler because of a storyline.

Title history

On October 13, 1970, the championship was introduced as the NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship during a taping of Championship Wrestling.[Note 2] It was announced that the Missouri Mauler had defeated the defending champion Pat O'Connor in New York City to win the title; this title change was fictitious and a storyline to introduce the championship to the promotion; nevertheless, O'Connor's reign is denoted as the first official reign. Because it was fictitious, further information regarding O'Connor's reign is unavailable.

On the September 6, 1973 taping of Championship Wrestling,[Note 2] JCP owner Jim Crockett, Jr. announced the retirement of the NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship and the establishment of the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship. At the time of this change, Jerry Brisco was in his fourth reign as the NWA Eastern Heavyweight Champion, and as a result of never losing the title, he was recognized as the first NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Champion. Because Brisco's fourth reign did not end, being awarded the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Title is not counted as a new reign overall in the title's history.[1] By 1974, JCP was also known as "Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling" (MACW), which is why all of its championships included "Mid-Atlantic" in their names.[2]

On December 26, 1986, Ron Garvin, after winning JCP's version of the NWA United States Tag Team Championship with Barry Windham, vacated the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship and handed the belt to Crockett, Jr. on a taping of World Championship Wrestling.[Note 3] Crockett, Jr. deactivated the championship for unknown reasons, and eventually, JCP was sold to Ted Turner in 1988, thus becoming the new promotion, World Championship Wrestling.[3]

In the late 1990s, NWA gave a group of promoters permission to establish a territory called "Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling"; however, this territory has not claimed any connection to the original JCP/MACW. As a result, their prime championship, called the MACW Heavyweight Championship,[4] has no connection to this original championship or its lineage.

Reigns

Overall, there were 63 reigns among 29 wrestlers. Fifteen of those reigns occurred while the title was called the "NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship" while 46 reigns occurred under the "NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship" name. Johnny Valentine ranks first in combined reigns by the length of 504 days with 2 reigns total. Wahoo McDaniel had the most reigns with seven. Ken Patera's second reign was the longest in the title's history at 334 days. All title changes occurred at JCP-promoted events: live events, pay-per-view events, and on televised events that aired on broadcast delay.

Key
No. Overall reign number
Reign Reign number for the specific champion
Days Number of days held
No. Champion Championship change Reign statistics Notes Ref.
Date Event Location Reign Days
NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship
1 Pat O'Connor August 8, 1970 Live event N/A 1 66 It was announced in local advertisements that O'Connor was the reigning Eastern Heavyweight Champion until October 13, 1970, when he lost the championship to the Missouri Mauler; this reign was a storyline to introduce the championship to JCP, and as a result, further information regarding how O'Connor won the title is unavailable. [5]
2 The Missouri Mauler October 13, 1970 Championship Wrestling N/A 1 275 The Missouri Mauler announced on local television from WGHP television studios that he had defeated O'Connor for the title in New York City; the title change was a continuation of the storyline to introduce the championship to JCP, and as a result, further information regarding the title change is unavailable. This title change aired on broadcast delay. [5][Note 2]
3 Danny Miller July 15, 1971 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 1 67
4 The Missouri Mauler September 20, 1971 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 2 71
5 Jack Brisco November 30, 1971 Championship Wrestling
[Note 2]
High Point, North Carolina 1 76 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
6 Rip Hawk February 14, 1972 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 1 56
7 Jack Brisco April 10, 1972 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 2 42
8 Rip Hawk May 22, 1972 Live event San Juan, Puerto Rico 2 22
9 Jerry Brisco June 13, 1972 Live event Columbia, South Carolina 1 76
10 Rip Hawk August 28, 1972 Live event Greenville, South Carolina 3 7
11 Jerry Brisco September 4, 1972 Live event Greenville, South Carolina 2 115
12 Rip Hawk December 28, 1972 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 4 65
13 Jerry Brisco March 3, 1973 Live vent Salem, North Carolina 3 67
14 Ole Anderson May 9, 1973 All Star Wrestling[Note 4] Raleigh, North Carolina 1 55 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship
15 (1) Jerry Brisco July 3, 1973 Live event Columbia, South Carolina 4 186 On September 6, 1973 the NWA retired the NWA Eastern Heavyweight Championship and introduced the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship to JCP as its replacement. As a result of Brisco being recognized as the final NWA Eastern Heavyweight Champion later the NWA recognized him as the first NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Champion. However, this reign is not considered to be a new reign overall in the title's history because Jerry Brisco originally never lost the title.
16 (2) Johnny Valentine January 5, 1974 Live event N/A 1 296 From the information known, Johnny Valentine was awarded the championship by Jim Crockett Jr. after Brisco traveled to Japan to wrestle and was unable to defend the title in the United States; a formal vacancy was not established, however.
-- Vacated October 28, 1974 -- -- -- --
17 (3) Johnny Valentine November 4, 1974 Live event N/A 2 135
18 (4) Paul Jones March 9, 1975 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 1 10 Jones' title win became a controversy as a result of Valentine having his leg on the ring rope when the referee counted the pinfall, which the referee failed to see. If this were seen, the pin count would have been stopped. [6]
19 (5) Johnny Valentine March 19, 1975 All Star Wrestling Raleigh, North Carolina 3 102 Valentine demanded a review of his match with Jones by NWA President Sam Muchnick, who ruled in favor of Valentine. As a result, Muchnick stripped Jones of the championship and awarded it to Valentine; a formal vacancy was not established, however. This title change aired on tape delay. [6]
20 (6) Wahoo McDaniel June 29, 1975 Live event Asheville, North Carolina 1 11
21 (7) Ric Flair July 10, 1975 Live event N/A 1 16
22 (8) Wahoo McDaniel July 26, 1975 Live event Asheville, North Carolina 2 56
23 (9) Ric Flair September 20, 1975 Live event Hampton, Virginia 2 226 [7]
24 (10) Wahoo McDaniel May 3, 1976 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 3 21
25 (11) Ric Flair May 24, 1976 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 3 110 [8]
26 (12) Wahoo McDaniel September 11, 1976 Live event Greenville, South Carolina 4 35
27 (13) Ric Flair October 16, 1976 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 4 72
28 (14) Wahoo McDaniel December 27, 1976 Live event Richmond, Virginia 5 166
29 (15) Greg Valentine June 11, 1977 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 1 59
30 (16) Wahoo McDaniel August 9, 1977 Live event Raleigh, North Carolina 6 29
31 (17) Greg Valentine September 7, 1977 Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling
[Note 4]
Raleigh, North Carolina 2 207 This title change aired on broadcast delay. As part of the storyline, Valentine "broke" Wahoo's leg, but this was not a legitimate injury.
32 (18) Wahoo McDaniel April 2, 1978 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 7 7
33 (19) Ken Patera April 9, 1978 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 1 161
33 (20) Tony Atlas September 17, 1978 Live event Roanoke, Virginia 1 28
34 (21) Ken Patera October 15, 1978 Live event Roanoke, Virginia 2 334
35 (22) Jim Brunzell September 14, 1979 Live event Richmond, Virginia 1 69
36 (23) Ray Stevens November 22, 1979 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 1 33
37 (24) Jim Brunzell December 25, 1979 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 2 168
38 (25) The Iron Sheik May 11, 1980 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 1 174 [9]
39 (26) Ricky Steamboat November 1, 1980 Live event Richmond, Virginia 1 166
40 (27) Ivan Koloff April 16, 1981 Live event Norfolk, Virginia 1 177
41 (28) Ricky Steamboat October 10, 1981 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 2 22
42 (29) Roddy Piper November 1, 1981 Live event Greensboro, North Carolina 1 180
43 (30) Jack Brisco May 10, 1982 Live event Greenville, North Carolina 3 (1) 58
43 (31) Roddy Piper July 7, 1982 World Wide Wrestling
[Note 5]
Charlotte, North Carolina 2 27 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
44 (32) Jack Brisco August 3, 1982 Live event Raleigh, North Carolina 4 (2) 29
45 (33) Paul Jones September 1, 1982 World Wide Wrestling
[Note 5]
Charlotte, North Carolina 2 47 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
46 (34) Jack Brisco October 18, 1982 Live event Greenville, South Carolina 5 (3) 15
47 (35) Paul Jones November 2, 1982 Live event Raleigh, North Carolina 3 28
48 (36) Jack Brisco November 30, 1982 Live event Columbia, South Carolina 6 61
49 (37) Dory Funk Jr. January 30, 1983 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 1 187
50 (38) Rufus Jones August 5, 1983 Live event Richmond, Virginia 1 120
51 (39) Dick Slater December 3, 1983 Live event Hampton, Virginia 1 11
52 (40) Ivan Koloff December 14, 1983 [Note 6] N/A 2 42 After Dick Slater won the NWA United States Championship on December 14, 1983, he elected to award Ivan Koloff the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship; however, the exact date and location of this title change is unknown, although it has been confirmed to have aired on broadcast delay.
53 (41) Angelo Mosca Jr. January 25, 1984 Live event Shelby, North Carolina 1 53
54 (42) Ivan Koloff March 18, 1984 Live event Charlotte, North Carolina 3 35
55 (43) Angelo Mosca Jr. April 22, 1984 [Note 6] Charlotte, North Carolina 2 20 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
56 (44) The Masked Outlaw May 12, 1984 [Note 6] Spencer, North Carolina 2 46 The Masked Outlaw was an alternate ring name of Dory Funk Jr. (who was suspended for shoving NWA representative Sandy Scott), who had won the title under his real name previously. This title change aired on broadcast delay.
57 (45) Angelo Mosca Jr. June 27, 1984 [Note 6] Norfolk, Virginia 3 63 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
58 (46) Ron Bass August 29, 1984 [Note 6] Spartanburg, South Carolina 1 199 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
59 (47) Buzz Tyler March 16, 1985 [Note 6] Greensboro, North Carolina 1 121 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
-- Vacated July 15, 1985 -- -- -- -- Buzz Tyler was stripped of the championship after he left JCP; title was declared vacant as a result.
60 (48) Krusher Khrushchev November 28, 1985 Starrcade (1985) Greensboro, North Carolina 1 44 Krusher Khrushchev defeated Sam Houston in a tournament final to win the vacant championship.
61 (49) Sam Houston January 11, 1986 World Championship Wrestling
[Note 3]
Atlanta, Georgia 1 66 This title change aired on broadcast delay.
Khrushchev legitimately injured his knee during this match; he would miss six months of action.
62 (50) Black Bart March 18, 1986 Live event Mooresville, North Carolina 1 168
63 (51) Ron Garvin September 2, 1986 Live event Spartanburg, South Carolina 1 115 After winning JCP's version of the NWA United States Tag Team Championship with Barry Windham, Garvin vacated the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship and handed it to Jim Crockett Jr. on the December 26, 1986 taping of World Championship Wrestling. The title was deactivated afterwards for unknown reasons by Crockett Jr., and JCP was then sold to Ted Turner in 1988.[3] As a result, Ron Garvin was the final wrestler to hold the NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Title.

Combined reigns

Key
Symbol Meaning
¤ The exact length of at least one title reign is uncertain, so the shortest possible length is used.
Rank Wrestler # of reigns Combined days
1 Johnny Valentine 3 504¤
[Note 7]
2 Ken Patera 2 495
3 Jerry Brisco 4 440¤
[Note 8]
4 Ric Flair 4 408¤
5 Missouri Mauler 2 347
6 Wahoo McDaniel 7 341¤
7 Greg Valentine 2 266
8 Jack Brisco 6 253¤
[Note 9]
9 Jim Brunzell 2 237
10 Ivan Koloff 3 237¤
[Note 10]
11 Dory Funk, Jr./The Masked Outlaw 2 233
12 Roddy Piper 2 207
13 Ron Bass 1 199
14 Rick Steamboat 2 188
15 The Iron Sheik 1 174
16 Black Bart 1 168
17 Rip Hawk 4 147¤
[Note 11]
18 Angelo Mosca, Jr. 3 136
19 Rufus Jones 1 120
20 Ron Garvin 1 115
21 Buzz Tyler 1 107¤
[Note 12]
22 Paul Jones 2 85
23 Danny Miller 1 67
24 Sam Houston 1 66
25 Ole Anderson 1 55
26 Ray Stevens 1 33
27 Tony Atlas 1 28
28 Dick Slater 1 28¤
[Note 13]
29 Pat O'Connor 1 1¤
[Note 1]

See also

Footnotes

  1. ^ a b The exact date on which Pat O' Connor won his only reign is unknown, which means that it lasted between 1 and 285 days.
  2. ^ a b c d Championship Wrestling was a television program for JCP that began airing on local WGHP television markets in 1964.
  3. ^ a b World Championship Wrestling was a television program for JCP that began airing on WTBS television markets in 1981.
  4. ^ a b All Star Wrestling, Wide World Wrestling, and World Wide Wrestling were television programs for JCP that began airing on local WRAL television markets in the late 1950s.
  5. ^ a b World Wide Wrestling (renamed from Wide World Wrestling in 1978) began airing on local WPCQ-TV television markets in 1981, after it moved from WRAL.
  6. ^ a b c d e f From 1983 to 1984, JCP taped programming in indoor arenas to air on television markets; however, the name of the programming and the markets it aired on is unknown.
  7. ^ The exact date on which Johnny Valentine won his first reign is unknown, which means that it lasted between 402 and 432 days.
  8. ^ The exact date on which Jerry Brisco lost his fourth championship reign is unknown, which means that it lasted between 182 and 212 days.
  9. ^ The exact date on which Jack Brisco lost his second reign in unknown, which means that it lasted between 15 and 45 days.
  10. ^ The exact date on which Ivan Koloff was awarded the championship by Dick Slater took place between December 14 and December 31, 1983, which means that his second reign lasted between 25 and 42 days.
  11. ^ The exact date on which Rip Hawk won his second reign is unknown, although it is confirmed in sources that it took place between April 25, 1972 and May 25, 1972. As a result, his reign lasted between 19 and 49 days.
  12. ^ The exact date on which Buzz Tyler was stripped of the championship is unknown, which means that his only reign lasted between 107 and 137 days.
  13. ^ The exact date on which Dick Slater awarded Ivan Koloff the championship is unknown, which means that his only reign lasted between 11 and 28 days.

References

General (title history)
  • Bourne, Dick. "Mid-Atlantic Wrestling: The Definitive History of the Mid-Atlantic Championship". Mid-Atlantic Gateway. Archived from the original on December 17, 2010. Retrieved 2009.
  • "NWA Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Title History". Wrestling Title Histories by Gary Will and Royal Duncan. Solie.org. Retrieved 2009.
General (television programming)
Specific
  1. ^ Bourne, Dick. "The Origin and Evolution of the Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship". Mid-Atlantic Gateway. Archived from the original on March 10, 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  2. ^ Bourne, Dick; David Chappell. "What's In a Name?". Mid-Atlantic Gateway. Archived from the original on August 21, 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  3. ^ a b Beekman, Scott (2006). Ringside: a history of professional wrestling in America. Greenwood Publishing Group. pp. 129-132. ISBN 0-275-98401-X.
  4. ^ "MACW's Latest Rankings". Mid-Atlantic Championship Wrestling. Archived from the original on August 14, 2009. Retrieved 2009.
  5. ^ a b "Clippings from the collection of Mark Eastridge". Mid-Atlantic Gateway. January 1971. Archived from the original on November 14, 2008. Retrieved 2009.
  6. ^ a b Bourne, Dick. "Why Paul Jones' victory over Johnny Valentine for the Mid-Atlantic Heavyweight Championship Should Be Recognized". Mid-Atlantic Gateway. Archived from the original on 2009-08-21. Retrieved .
  7. ^ Hoops, Brian (September 20, 2015). "Dailt pro wrestling history (9/20): AJ Styles wins TAn World Title". Wrestling Observer Figure Four Online. Retrieved 2015.
  8. ^ Hoops, Brian (May 24, 2015). "On this day in pro wrestling history (May 24): Harley Race wins NWA title due to interesting circumstances, Ric Flair beats Kerry Von Erich in Japan". Wrestling Observer Figure Four Online. Retrieved 2017.
  9. ^ Hoops, Brian (May 11, 2015). "On this day in pro wrestling history (May 11): Von Erichs vs. Verne & Don Leo Jonathan, Shane Douglas vs 2 Cold Scorpio". Wrestling Observer Newsletter. Retrieved 2020.

External links


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