NBA Development League All-Star Game
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NBA Development League All-Star Game

The NBA D-League All-Star Game was an annual exhibition basketball game held by the NBA Development League (D-League). The D-League was founded in 2001 as the National Basketball Development League (NBDL) and later as the NBA Development League.[1] The league, now known as the NBA G League, serves as the National Basketball Association's official minor league basketball organization.

The game was first held during the 2006-07 season as part of the NBA All-Star Weekend. The D-League All-Star Game was played on Saturday in the same host city as the NBA All-Star Game. However, the game was not held in the same arena as all the other All-Star Saturday events. Instead, it was held on the NBA Jam Session's practice court.[2]

In addition to the All-Star Game, the D-League also held the D-League Dream Factory Friday Night, an event modeled after the NBA All-Star Saturday Night. The event included popular competitions from the All-Star Saturday Night, such as the slam dunk contest and the three-point shootout. The Dream Factory Friday Night was first held during the second D-League All-Star Game in 2008.[3]

In 2018, the All-Star Game was replaced by the NBA G League International Challenge, and the league's top players were instead named to its Midseason All-NBA G League Team.

All-Star Game

Pops Mensah-Bonsu won the inaugural D-League All-Star Game Most Valuable Player Award.

In the D-League All-Star Game, twenty of the league's top players were selected to the All-Star roster by a combination of fan balloting on the official league website and voting by the head coaches of the teams. NBA players assigned to D-League teams were eligible to be selected. Players selected by coaches and fans must have been on an active roster of a D-League team during the All-Star Weekend. If a player was unable to participate because of injury, a recall by his NBA team, or a call-up by an NBA team, a replacement player was named. The starting lineups were picked by the head coaches.[4][5] The coaches for the All-Star game were the head coaches of the teams with the best winning percentage in the league through the three weeks before the All-Star game.[6] The first two games were played in four quarters of 12 minutes, similar to a regular D-League game. However, the next two games were played in two 20-minute halves, similar to a college basketball game and the NBA All-Star Rookie Challenge.

The inaugural D-League All-Star Game was held in Las Vegas, Nevada during the 2007 NBA All-Star Weekend. The players were divided into the Eastern Division and the Western Division. The East won by 14 points and Pops Mensah-Bonsu was named as the All-Star Game Most Valuable Player.[7] In the second and third All-Star Game, the players were divided into the Blue Team and the Red Team since there were three divisions in the D-League at the time. The Blue Team won the 2008 game, while the Red Team won in 2009. Jeremy Richardson won the 2008 All-Star Game MVP award and two players, Blake Ahearn and Courtney Sims, were jointly named as the MVP of the 2009 game.[8][9] In 2010, the players were divided into the Eastern Conference and the Western Conference after the league switched back into two conferences. The West won the game, led by Brian Butch who won the 2010 All-Star Game MVP award.[10]

In 2018, the NBA G League International Challenge replaced the traditional All-Star Game.[11] The International Challenge matched select American G League players against the Mexico national basketball team. The U.S. team, chosen by a USA Basketball committee, was also expected to compete in the 2019 Americas qualifiers for the FIBA Basketball World Cup.[12] In lieu of the All-Star Game, the league instead named Midseason All-NBA G League Teams for each conference.[11]

Results

^A On assignment from the Dallas Mavericks

Dream Factory

The D-League Dream Factory was a series of basketball skills competitions modeled after the NBA All-Star Saturday Night. The event took place during the NBA All-Star Weekend and was held on the NBA Jam Session's practice court. The league first hosted the event during the 2008 NBA All-Star Weekend. The final event included the slam dunk contest, the three-point shootout and the shooting stars competition, all of which were also annual competitions in the NBA All-Star Saturday Night at the time. The H.O.R.S.E competition was discontinued after 2009 and the hot-shot competition was discontinued after 2008.

Slam Dunk Contest

James White won the Slam Dunk Contest in 2009.

The slam dunk contest showcased a player's skill in making a slam dunk. The contest was contested by four players. In the first round, each contestant performed two dunks. Two contestants with the highest score from those dunks advanced to the final round, where they had to perform two more dunks each to determine the dunk champion.[13]

Three-Point Shootout

Blake Ahearn won the Three-Point Shootout in 2009.

In the three-point shootout, four contestants attempted to make as many three-point field goals as possible from five shooting stations behind the three-point arc in one minute. Players began shooting from one corner of the court, and moved from station to station along the three-point arc until they reached the other corner. Each of the first four stations had four standard balls, worth one point each, and one specially-colored "money ball", worth two points. The fifth shooting station consisted of five two-point money balls. Two contestants with the highest score advanced to the final round, where they re-attempted the three-point shots again from the five shooting stations.[13]

Shooting Stars Competition

The Shooting Stars Competition was competed by four teams of three players each. In this competition, each team needed to make six shots from six shooting locations of increasing difficulties. Each team selected a specific player rotation to follow throughout the competition. Each shot must have been made before the next player began shooting in succession. The teams had two minutes to complete the course and the team who made all six shots with the fastest time wins the competition.[15]

H-O-R-S-E Competition

The objective of the H.O.R.S.E competition was to accrue as few of the five letters as possible. A player was given a letter every time they failed to duplicate the shot of another player. Each player was given 24 seconds to make or duplicate the shot (dunking was prohibited). Each player who failed to duplicate five shots was eliminated from the competition. The competition was contested by four players. The competition was discontinued after the 2009 event.[13]

Hot-Shot Competition

In the Hot-Shot competition, four teams of a D-League player and a D-League fan had to score as many points as possible from the four shooting spots in one minute. The fan was allowed to attempt the one-point layup, while the player was allowed to attempt from any shooting spots, a one-point layup, a two-point free throw, a three-point shot from behind the arc, and a five-point half court shot. Two teams competed simultaneously at each end of the court and the winners advanced to the final round. The fan from the winning team had an opportunity to be a judge in the Slam Dunk Competition.[16] The event was discontinued after the inaugural event in 2008.

References

  1. ^ "NBDL adopts new name, logo, and ball". NBA.com/DLeague. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. July 19, 2005. Archived from the original on September 7, 2012. Retrieved 2010.
  2. ^ "Players With NBA Experience Highlight All-Star Rosters". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 17, 2007. Archived from the original on February 11, 2018. Retrieved 2010.
  3. ^ Brennan, Matthew (February 6, 2008). "D-League Dream Factory Friday Night Preview". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved 2010.
  4. ^ "2009 NBA D-League All-Star Game Participants Unveiled". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 3, 2009. Archived from the original on June 28, 2011. Retrieved 2010.
  5. ^ "2009 NBA D-League All-Star Replacements Announced". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 11, 2009. Archived from the original on March 19, 2009. Retrieved 2010.
  6. ^ "Bryan Gates and Dan Panaggio To Coach 2008 D-League All-Star Game Presented by Spalding". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 4, 2008. Archived from the original on February 16, 2009. Retrieved 2010.
  7. ^ "Mensah-Bonsu Leads East To D-League All-Star Victory". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 17, 2007. Archived from the original on May 20, 2014. Retrieved 2010.
  8. ^ Wurst, Matt (February 16, 2008). "Blue All-Stars Top Red, 117-99; Jeremy Richardson Takes M.V.P. Honors". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on February 20, 2008. Retrieved 2010.
  9. ^ "Sims And Ahearn Named Co-MVPs As Red Defeats Blue In All-Star Game". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 14, 2009. Archived from the original on May 21, 2012. Retrieved 2010.
  10. ^ "Brian Butch Captures MVP Honors In 2010 All-Star Game". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 13, 2010. Archived from the original on February 21, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  11. ^ a b "Midseason All-NBA G League Teams Unveiled" (Press release). NBA G League. February 2, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  12. ^ "NBA G League stars to play Mexico at NBA All-Star Game". USA Today. Associated Press. December 9, 2017.
  13. ^ a b c "Field Set For 2009 Dream Factory Friday Night". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 5, 2009. Archived from the original on April 11, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  14. ^ nbagleague (17 February 2013). "2013 NBA D-League 3-Point Champ" – via YouTube.
  15. ^ "Field Set For 2010 NBA D-League Dream Factory Friday". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. February 4, 2010. Archived from the original on February 19, 2010. Retrieved 2010.
  16. ^ Brennan, Matthew (February 6, 2008). "D-League Dream Factory Friday Night Preview". NBA.com. Turner Sports Interactive, Inc. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved 2010.

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