Mulavarman
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Mulavarman
The name Shri M?-la-va-rmma-?a? R?-jña? "The Lord, Prince Mulavarman" in a yupa inscription in Brahmi script from Kutai. 4th-5th century CE.[1] In other inscriptions, Mulavarman is also called "Lord of Kings".[2]
Kutai is located in Asia
Kutai
Kutai
Location of Kutai in Indonesia.

Mulavarman was a king of Kutai Martadipura Kingdom of the island of Borneo around the year 400 CE. What little is known of him comes from seven inscriptions found at a sanctuary.[3] He is known to have been generous to brahmins through the giving of gifts including thousands of cattle and large amounts of gold. [4]

Reign

He was the grandson of Kundunga, and the son of Asvavarman, according to one of his inscriptions.[5] The sanctuary bears the name of the founder of the dynasty, Vaprakesvara.[6]:52

The inscriptions of Mulavarman in Brahmi script on "y?pa" sacrificial posts are the earliest known evidence of Indian influence in the Malay World, in the fourth century CE, long before the region was Indianized.[7][8][9] The inscriptions of Mulavarman were followed about fifty years later by the inscriptions of another king, Purnavarman, in West Java.[7]

The similarity if the name ending "-varman" with that of the rulers of the Pallava dynasty has been commented upon since discovery.[10]

Inscriptions

The inscriptions of Mulavarman in Brahmi script were found on "y?pa" sacrificial posts.[7]

References

  1. ^ VOGEL, J. Ph. (1918). "THE YUPA INSCRIPTIONS OF KING MULAVARMAN, FROM KOETEI (EAST BORNEO)". Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch-Indië. 74 (1/2): 167-232. ISSN 1383-5408.
  2. ^ VOGEL, J. Ph. (1918). "THE YUPA INSCRIPTIONS OF KING MULAVARMAN, FROM KOETEI (EAST BORNEO)". Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch-Indië. 74 (1/2): 213. ISSN 1383-5408.
  3. ^ Hall, D.G.E. (1981). A History of South-East Asia, Fourth Edition. Hong Kong: Macmillan Education Ltd. p. 38. ISBN 0-333-24163-0.
  4. ^ Tarling, Nicholas (1999). The Cambridge History of Southeast Asia Volume 1 Part 1 From early times to c. 1500. Cambridge, England, United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press. p. 305. ISBN 0-521-66369-5.
  5. ^ VOGEL, J. Ph. (1918). "THE YUPA INSCRIPTIONS OF KING MULAVARMAN, FROM KOETEI (EAST BORNEO)". Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch-Indië. 74 (1/2): 212. ISSN 1383-5408.
  6. ^ Coedès, George (1968). Walter F. Vella (ed.). The Indianized States of Southeast Asia. trans.Susan Brown Cowing. University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-0368-1.
  7. ^ a b c Shome, Tony (2004). Malay Political Leadership. Routledge. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-135-78933-6.
  8. ^ Sircar, D. C. (1996). Indian Epigraphy. Motilal Banarsidass Publ. p. 212. ISBN 978-81-208-1166-9.
  9. ^ Mitra, Karabi (2011). "RELIGION IN PRE-ISLAMIC INDONESIA". Proceedings of the Indian History Congress. 72: 1030. ISSN 2249-1937.
  10. ^ VOGEL, J. Ph. (1918). "THE YUPA INSCRIPTIONS OF KING MULAVARMAN, FROM KOETEI (EAST BORNEO)". Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde van Nederlandsch-Indië. 74 (1/2): 167-232. ISSN 1383-5408.

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Mulavarman
 



 



 
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