Molly Tuttle
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Molly Tuttle
Molly Tuttle
Molly Tuttle.jpg
Background information
Molly Rose Tuttle
Born 1993 (age 24–25)
Santa Clara County, California
Genres Bluegrass, Americana, Country Folk
Musician
Instruments Guitar
2006-present
Labels Compass Records
The Tuttles, the Goodbye Girls
Website mollytuttlemusic.com

Molly Tuttle (born 1993) is a vocalist, songwriter, banjo player and guitarist, recording artist and teacher in the bluegrass tradition, noted for her flatpicking, clawhammer,[1] and cross-picking[2] guitar prowess. She has cited Laurie Lewis, Kathy Kallick, and Hazel Dickens as role models.[3] In 2017, Tuttle was the first woman to win the International Bluegrass Music Association's Guitar Player of the Year award.[4] She went on to win the award a second time in 2018.[]

Biography

Early career

Raised in the San Francisco Bay Area, Tuttle began playing guitar at age 8,[5] and at age 11 played onstage with her father Jack Tuttle, a bluegrass multi-instrumentalist and instructor. At age 15, she joined her family band The Tuttles with AJ Lee. Her siblings Sullivan (guitar) and Michael (mandolin), and mandolist AJ Lee[6] are also in the band.[7]

In 2006, at age 13, Tuttle recorded The Old Apple Tree with her dad, an album of duets.[8]

In 2011, the Tuttles self-released their Introducing the Tuttles album,[9] and the Endless Ocean album in 2013.[10]

2012 was a breakout year for Tuttle. She:

  • was awarded merit scholarships to the Berklee College of Music for music and composition[11]
  • received the Foundation for Bluegrass Music's first Hazel Dickens Memorial Scholarship[12]
  • won the Chris Austin Songwriting Competition at the Merlefest Music Festival[13]
  • was named Best Female Vocalist and Best Guitar Player by the Northern California Bluegrass Society[14]
  • appeared with her dad on A Prairie Home Companion[15]

Collaborations

While studying at the Berklee College of Music, in 2014, Tuttle met and joined the all-female bluegrass group the Goodbye Girls.[13] They combine bluegrass, jazz, and Swedish folk music.[16] Other members are Allison de Groot (banjo), Lena Jonsson (fiddle), and Britanny Karlson (bass). They released an EP Going to Boston in 2014, and the album Snowy SIde of the Mountain in 2016.[17] The band has also toured Jonsson's home country Sweden several times.[18]

Tuttle also recorded Molly Tuttle & John Mailander, a duet EP with fiddler John Mailander.[19]

In 2018, she joined Alison Brown, Missy Raines, Sierra Hull, and Becky Buller in a supergroup. The quintet performed at the Rockygrass festival in Lyons Colorado on July 27 2018. Initially known as the Julia Belles, the group later became known as the First Ladies of Bluegrass. Additional gigs were booked at Analog at the Hutton Hotel in Nashville on Sept 18, 2018 and the IBMA Wide Open Bluegrass Festival on September 28, 2018.[]

The First Ladies of Bluegrass are featured on the first single from a full length CD by Missy Raines titled Royal Traveler due out October 5, 2018 on Compass Records.[]

Solo career

In 2015, Tuttle moved from Boston to Nashville.[20] Her EP Rise was released in 2017 after a crowdfunding campaign. She wrote all of the songs on the 7-song album, which was produced by Kai Welch.[21] Guests included Darrell Scott, the Milk Carton Kids, Kathy Kallick, and Nathaniel Smith.[22]

She formed The Molly Tuttle Band, which includes Wes Corbett (banjo), Joe K. Walsh (mandolin), and Hasee Ciaccio (bass).[13]

In 2017, Tuttle signed with Alison Brown's Compass Records.[23][24]

Molly was selected by Buddy Miller to join his "Cavalcade of Stars" section of Hardly Strictly Bluegrass on the Rooster Stage on October 6, 2018.

Awards

Year Association Category Nominated Work Result Ref
2016 International Bluegrass Music Awards Momentum Award Herself Won
2017 International Bluegrass Music Awards Guitar Player of the Year Won [25][4]
2018 International Folk Music Awards Song of the Year "You Didn't Call My Name" Won
Americana Music Honors & Awards Instrumentalist of the Year Herself Won [26]
International Bluegrass Music Awards Emerging Artist of the Year Nominated [27]
Guitar Player of the Year Won
Female Vocalist of the Year Nominated
Album of the Year Rise Nominated
Song of the Year "You Didn't Call My Name" Nominated
Recorded Event of the Year "Swept Away"[A] Won

^ A. with Missy Raines, Alison Brown, Becky Buller and Sierra Hull

Discography

Solo albums

  • 2017: Rise EP (self-released)

The Goodbye Girls

  • 2014: Going to Boston (self-released)
  • 2016: Snowy Side of the Mountain (self-released)

Molly Tuttle and John Mailander

  • 2014: Molly Tuttle and John Mailander EP (Back Studio)

The Tuttles With AJ Lee

  • 2012: Introducing the Tuttles With AJ Lee (self-released)
  • 2013: Endless Ocean (self-released)

Molly and Jack Tuttle

  • 2007: The Old Apple Tree (Back Studio)

Also appears on

  • 2015: Mile Rocks - Mile Rocks and Friends (Audio & Video Labs)
  • 2017: AJ Lee - AJ Lee (self-released)
  • 2017: Korby Lenker - Thousand Springs (Relativity)
  • 2017: Bobby Osborne - Original (Compass)
  • 2017: Billy Strings - Turmoil & Tinfoil (Apostol)

References

  1. ^ Jason Verlinde (September 1, 2016). "Molly Tuttle - "Old Man at the Mill"". Fretboard Journal. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ Jeffrey Pepper Rodgers (February 16, 2017). "Crosspicking 101: A Private Bluegrass Lesson with Molly Tuttle". Acoustic Guitar. Archived from the original on September 29, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ Jewly Hight (August 29, 2017). "World Cafe Nashville: Molly Tuttle". World Cafe. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ a b Juli Thanki (September 29, 2017). "Molly Tuttle makes bluegrass history at IMBA Awards in Raleigh". Tennessean. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ Kat Harding (September 27, 2017). "Molly Tuttle Is IBMA's First Female Nominee for Guitarist of the Year--And She's Not Stopping There". Indy Week. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ Easy Ed (June 15, 2017). "AJ Lee: A Flower Blooms in the California Bluegrass". No Depression. Archived from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ "Molly Tuttle: From Homegrown Bluegrass to a New Solo Album". No Depression Roland. August 16, 2016. Archived from the original on October 4, 2017.
  8. ^ Adam Perlmutter (August 24, 2017). "Molly Tuttle: Organic & Acoustic". Premier Guitar. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  9. ^ "Northern California Bluegrass Awards Says The Tuttles - Best Bluegrass Band". Prescription Bluegrass. February 3, 2011. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  10. ^ John Curtis Goad (July 22, 2013). "Endless Ocean - The Tuttles with A.J. Lee". Bluegrass Today. Archived from the original on September 14, 2015. Retrieved 2017.
  11. ^ Dave Stewart (January 27, 2015). "Dave Stewart Entertainment Announces Artist Shows in Nashville". The Daily Country. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  12. ^ Michael Hall (October 5, 2011). "Molly Tuttle Awarded First Hazel Dickens Memorial Scholarship, Will Celebrate At Brown Barn Saturday". Northern California Bluegrass Society. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  13. ^ a b c Haylie Ellison (May 4, 2017). "The Molly Tuttle Band is coming to Roseburg on May 7". News-Review. Archived from the original on July 9, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  14. ^ John Lawless (February 9, 2012). "Tuttles kill in Northern California". Bluegrass Today. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  15. ^ Darry Madden (October 24, 2012). "Student Molly Tuttle Performs on Prairie Home Companion". Berklee College of Music. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  16. ^ Cat Johnson (July 18, 2017). "Preview: Goodbye Girls to Play Don Quixote's". GoodTimes Santa Cruz. Archived from the original on October 1, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  17. ^ Red Line Roots (May 27, 2015). "9 Questions to Newport: Molly Tuttle (of The Goodbye Girls)". No Depression. Archived from the original on October 1, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  18. ^ Alison Richter (September 20, 2017). "Emerging Bluegrass Artist Molly Tuttle on Influences, Music and Gear". Guitar Girl. Archived from the original on October 1, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  19. ^ Paul Hormick (May 1, 2014). "Molly Tuttle & John Mailander". San Diego Troubadour. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  20. ^ Brian Carroll (July 14, 2017). "Rising Up, Pickin' The Balance: An Interview With Molly Tuttle". Red Line Roots. Archived from the original on September 18, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  21. ^ Kristin Brown (May 10, 2017). "Molly Tuttle Talks About Her New EP 'Rise'". Cowboys and Indians. Archived from the original on June 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  22. ^ Brittney McKenna (June 30, 2017). "AS Discovery: Molly Tuttle". American Songwriter. Archived from the original on October 26, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  23. ^ Lisa Snedeker (September 28, 2017). "Molly Tuttle makes history at IBMA 2017". Huffington Post. Retrieved 2017.
  24. ^ John Curtis Goad (September 26, 2017). "Molly Tuttle to Compass Records". Bluegrass Today. Archived from the original on May 16, 2018. Retrieved 2017.
  25. ^ Stephen L. Betts (September 29, 2017). "2017 Bluegrass Awards: Earls of Leicester Named Entertainer of the Year". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on September 30, 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  26. ^ "The 2018 Americana Music Award Winners". KOKE FM. Retrieved 2018.
  27. ^ https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-country/molly-tuttle-becky-buller-lead-2018-bluegrass-award-nominations-703625/

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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