List of Presidents of the National Rifle Association
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List of Presidents of the National Rifle Association

Incumbent NRA president Carolyn D. Meadows

The position of president of the National Rifle Association (NRA) is a symbolic figurehead role,[1][2] which dates back to the organization's foundation in New York on 17 November 1871.[3] Founded by George Wood Wingate and William Conant Church, two Union veterans dismayed by the lack of shooting skills among recruits,[4] the rifle association voted to have Union general Ambrose Burnside as its first president.[5] Church succeeded Burnside as the second president of the organization,[6] and Wingate would become the tenth in 1886.[7]

Throughout its history, presidents have served purposes ranging from providing the NRA greater legitimacy[7][8] to provoking outrage and condemnation.[3][9] Since the 1990s, some NRA presidents have made controversial statements such as when James W. Porter II referred to Barack Obama as a "fake president" and when Charlton Heston proclaimed to gun control advocates that they could only have his firearm after taking it "from my cold, dead hands."[3][10]

While once elected at the annual convention,[11] as of 2019, NRA presidents are chosen by the board of directors.[1][12] They generally serve out two one-year terms.[13] While the position of president is unpaid due to the organization's bylaws,[14] during Oliver North's time in office he sought to make the position a paid one, but this initiative failed when he was ousted as president after a power struggle with vice president Wayne LaPierre.[15] Some former presidents have later been employed by the NRA[16] such as Marion Hammer, the association's first female president, who is the executive director of the group's Florida affiliate.[17][18] Since 1991, the executive vice president, who acts as the group's chief operating officer,[19] has been Wayne LaPierre, despite several internal challenges to his role.[19][20]

There have been 65 NRA presidents, serving 67 distinct terms. Those who have held the position include former United States president Ulysses S. Grant, Harlon Carter, American Football League commissioner Joe Foss, and David Keene. The president as of 2020 is Carolyn D. Meadows.

Presidents of the National Rifle Association

Ambrose Burnside in a chair
Ambrose Burnside was the first president of the NRA.
Black and white photograph of Merritt A. Edson in uniform
Retired Marine officer "Red Mike" Edson (2006)
Photograph of Charlton Heston in a suit addressing guests
List of presidents
# Name Tenure Background Ref.
1 Ambrose Burnside 1871-1872 Union general [5]
2 William Conant Church 1872-1875 Journalist [21][22]
3 Alexander Shaler 1875-1877 Union general [23][24]
4 N. P. Stanton 1877-1880 Judge [24][25][26]
5 Henry A. Gildersleeve 1880 Judge [26][27]
6 Winfield S. Hancock 1880-1881 Democratic presidential nominee in 1880 [28][29][30]
7 E. L. Molineux 1882 Union soldier [27]
8 Ulysses S. Grant 1883-1884 18th President of the United States [27]
9 Philip Sheridan 1885 Union general [27]
10 George Wood Wingate 1886-1900 Union soldier [7][8]
11 Bird W. Spencer 1900-1907 Brigadier general [8][31]
12 James Drain 1907-1916 Washington Adjutant General [31][32]
13 William Libbey 1916-1921 Sports shooter [33][34]
14 Smith W. Brookhart 1921-1925 U.S. Senator from Iowa [35][36]
15 Francis E. Warren 1925[a] U.S. Senator from Wyoming [38][37]
16 Smith W. Brookhart 1925-1926 U.S. Senator from Iowa [39][40]
17 Fred M. Waterbury 1926-1927 Lieutenant colonel [41]
18 L. M. Rumsey Jr. 1928 Lieutenant colonel [42][43]
19 Patrick J. Hurley 1929 Assistant Secretary of War [44]
20 Benedict Crowell 1930-1931 Brigadier general [45]
21 G. A. Fraser 1932 Brigadier general [45][46]
22 Karl T. Frederick 1934 Sports shooter [47]
23 Ammon B. Critchfield 1936 Ohio Adjutant general [45][48][49]
24 Gustavus D. Pope 1937-1938 Humanitarian [45][50][51]
25 Littleton W. T. Waller Jr. 1939 Brigadier general [45][52]
26 Nathaniel C. Nash 1941 Botanist [45][53]
27 Hilliard Comstock 1942-1943 Judge [45][54]
28 Thurman Randle 1944-1946 Lieutenant colonel [45][55]
29 Francis W. Parker Jr. 1946-1947 Patent lawyer [45][56]
30 Emmett Swanson 1948-1949 Sports shooter [45][57]
31 Merritt A. Edson 1949-1950 Marine Corps general [45][57]
32 Harry D. Linn 1951-1952 Businessman [45][58]
33 J. Alvin Badeaux 1953-1954 Activist [45][59][60]
34 Morton C. Mumma 1955 Rear admiral [45][61]
35 George R. Whittington 1957 Attorney [45][62]
36 Irvine C. Porter 1959-1961 Attorney [45][63][64]
37 John M. Schooley 1961-1963 Sheriff of Denver [45][65][66]
38 Bartlett Rummel 1963-1964 Judge [45][67]
39 Harlon Carter 1965-1967 Activist [45][68]
40 Harold W. Glassen 1967-1968 Sports shooter [45][69]
41 Woodson D. Scott 1969-1970 Attorney [70][71]
42 Fred M. Hakenjos 1971 Artist [45][72]
43 C. R. Gutermuth 1973-1974 Conservationist [45][73][74]
44 Merrill W. Wright 1975 Major general [45][63]
45 Lloyd M. Mustin 1977-1978 Vice admiral [11][75][76][77]
46 John B. Layton 1979 Washington, D.C. chief of police [45][78]
47 Keith M. Gaffaney 1981-1983 Police officer [45][79]
48 Howard W. Pollock 1983-1985 Alaskan Congressman [45][80]
49 Alonzo H. Garcelon 1985 Dentist [45][63][81]
50 James E. Reinke 1985-1988 Eastern Airlines Vice President [81][82][83][84]
51 Joe Foss 1988-1990 20th Governor of South Dakota [45][85]
52 Richard D. Riley 1990-1992 Activist [86][45][87]
53 Robert K. Corbin 1992-1993 Arizona Attorney General [45][88]
54 Thomas L. Washington 1994-1995 Conservationist [45][89]
55 Marion Hammer 1995-1998 Activist [18][90][91]
56 Charlton Heston 1998-2003 Actor [92]
57 Kayne Robinson 2003-2005 Des Moines chief of detectives [93][94]
58 Sandra Froman 2005-2007 Attorney [95]
59 John C. Sigler 2007-2009 Attorney [96][97]
60 Ron Schmeits 2009-2011 Mayor of Jordan, Minnesota [97][98]
61 David Keene 2011-2013 Activist [99]
62 James W. Porter II 2013-2015 Activist[b] [64][100]
63 Allan D. Cors 2015-2017 Sports shooter [101][102][103]
64 Pete Brownell 2017-2018 Businessman [93][104]
65 Carolyn D. Meadows 2018 Activist [105]
66 Oliver North 2018-2019 Political commentator [106]
67 Carolyn D. Meadows 2019- Activist [105]

Notes

  1. ^ Resigned 16 May 1925 along with first Vice President Major General Fred C. Ainsworth. At the time, Fred M. Waterbury was second Vice President.[37]
  2. ^ Son of Irvine C. Porter.[64]

References

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