List of Best-selling Latin Albums in the United States
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List of Best-selling Latin Albums in the United States
Members of the Buena Vista Social Club performing live in 2015.
Buena Vista Social Club's self-titled album, released in 1997, is the second best-selling Latin album in the United States.

Since July 1993, Billboard has published the best-selling Latin albums in the United States on the Top Latin Albums chart.[1] An album is recognized as "Latin" by Billboard and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) if 51 percent or more of its content is in the Spanish language.[2][3] On October 18, 2017, Billboard published a list of the 25 best-selling Latin albums in country since September 1992.[4] As of October 2017, the best-selling Latin album in the United States is Dreaming of You by Selena, her fifth and final studio album, which was posthumously released in 1995.[4] It has sold more than 2,942,000 copies since its release.[4]Dreaming of You became the first predominately Spanish-language album to top the Billboard 200 and was the best-selling Latin album of 1995 and 1996.[5][6][7] Selena's fourth studio album, Amor Prohibido, has sold more than 1,246,000 copies and is the fourth best-selling Latin album in the United States.[4]

Sales data is compiled by Nielsen SoundScan from a sample that includes music stores, music departments at electronics and stores, Internet sales (both physical and digital) and verifiable sales from concert venues in the United States.[8] Nielsen SoundScan has tracked sales of records in the country since March 1991.[9] SoundScan does not include sales from small retailers without electronic cash registers and nontraditional outlets such as flea markets and drugstores.[10] Prior to the inception of the Top Latin Albums chart, sales of Latin albums were reported by Latin music retailers and distributors and divided into three subcategories: Latin Pop, Tropical/Salsa, and Regional Mexican.[1]

Sales certifications for US album sales are presented by the RIAA,[11] who began awarding certifications in 1958.[12] Initially, certifications were based on units shipped to retail outlets: sales of 500,000 are awarded gold, 1,000,000 for platinum and 2,000,000 or more for multi-platinum.[12] On February 1, 2016, the RIAA updated its methodology for certifying albums by including audio streaming and track sales equivalent.[13] Beginning in 2000, the RIAA launched the Gold and Platinum Awards (Spanish: Los Premios Oro y Platino) to acknowledge the Latin music market in the United States.[14] As of December 20, 2013, the current thresholds for the Latin certifications are 30,000 sales for gold (Disco de oro), 60,000 sales for platinum (Disco de platino), and 120,000 sales or more for multi-platinum (Disco de multi-platino). The previous thresholds for Latin certifications were 50,000 sales for gold, 100,000 sales for platinum, and 200,000 sales for multi-platinum.[15]

The first Latin artist to have two Spanish-language albums certified platinum was Luis Miguel, with Romance and Segundo Romance.[16] The latter album is also the 21st best-selling Latin record in the United States with sales of over 603,000 copies.[4]Me Estoy Enamorando by Alejandro Fernández and Vuelve by Ricky Martin were the best-selling Latin albums of 1998 and 1999, respectively, and were both certified platinum by the RIAA.[17][18]Shakira and Maná are the only acts with more than two albums on the list. Shakira's albums Pies Descalzos and Dónde Están los Ladrones? were both certified Platinum while her 2005 album, Fijación Oral, Vol. 1 was certified eleven times Disco de platino. Maná is the act with the most entries on the list, with four albums: ¿Dónde Jugarán los Niños?, Sueños Líquidos, MTV Unplugged and Amar es Combatir.[4] As of November 2017, the most-certified album is Dreaming of You, which has been awarded Disco de platino 59 times, representing 3,540,000 units.[19]

Best-selling albums

Positions are as of October 2017;[4] sales, where shown, are from the reference given, which may be at a different date, and cannot be used to infer changes in position.

Luis Miguel performing at the 2012 People en Español festival
Luis Miguel was the first Latin artist to have two Spanish-language albums certified platinum.
Shakira at the 2012 NRJ Music Awards in France.
Colombian singer Shakira has three of the best-selling Latin albums in the US.
Key
Gold Gold certification (500,000 units)
Platinum Platinum certification (1,000,000 units)
Platinum (Latin) Disco de Platino certification (60,000 units)
Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013 Disco de Platino certification (100,000 units)[a]
Top 25 best-selling Latin albums in the US[b]
No. Album Artist Record label[c] Released[c] Chart peak[d] Sales (as of date) Certification[c]
1 Dreaming of You Selena EMI Latin July 18, 1995 1 2,942,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 59× Platinum (Latin)
2 Buena Vista Social Club Buena Vista Social Club Nonesuch/Atlantic September 5, 1997 1 1,925,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
3 The Best of the Gipsy Kings Gipsy Kings Nonesuch/Atlantic February 27, 1995 2 1,563,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
4 Amor Prohibido Selena EMI Latin March 13, 1994 1 1,246,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 36× Platinum (Latin)
5 Historia de un Ídolo, Vol. 1 Vicente Fernández Sony Discos November 17, 2000 1 1,242,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Gold
6 Mi Tierra Gloria Estefan Epic June 14, 1993 1 1,232,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 16× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013
7 Barrio Fino Daddy Yankee VI Music July 13, 2004 1 1,083,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
8 Fijación Oral, Vol. 1 Shakira Epic June 7, 2005 1 1,019,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 11× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013
9 Dónde Están los Ladrones? Shakira Sony Discos September 2, 1998 1 920,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
10 Vuelve Ricky Martin Sony Discos February 28, 1998 1 888,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
11 Suavemente Elvis Crespo Sony Tropical April 7, 1998 1 879,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
12 ¿Dónde Jugarán los Niños? Maná WEA Latina November 13, 1992 4 856,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 12× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013
13 Barrio Fino en Directo Daddy Yankee VI Music December 13, 2005 1 809,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Gold
14 Un Día Normal Juanes Universal Music Latino May 21, 2002 1 745,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 6× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013
15 Mi Sangre Juanes Universal Music Latino September 28, 2004 1 739,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 8× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013
16 Sueños Líquidos Maná WEA Latina October 17, 1997 1 706,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
17 Amar es Combatir Maná Warner Music Latina August 22, 2006 1 702,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Gold
18 MTV Unplugged Maná WEA Latina June 22, 1999 1 701,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Gold
19 Romances Luis Miguel WEA Latina August 27, 1997 1 687,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
20 Pa'l Mundo Wisin & Yandel Machete Music November 8, 2005 1 676,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Gold
21 Segundo Romance Luis Miguel WEA Latina August 30, 1994 1 603,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
22 Trozos de Mi Alma Marco Antonio Solís Fonovisa January 26, 1999 1 598,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
23 Pies Descalzos Shakira Sony Discos February 13, 1996 5 580,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
24 Me Estoy Enamorando Alejandro Fernández Sony Discos September 25, 1997 1 576,000 (Oct 2017)[4] Platinum
25 El Hijo del Pueblo Vicente Fernández Sony Discos January 18, 1991 -- 568,000 (Oct 2017)[4] 2× Platinum (Latin)Certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013

See also

Notes

  1. ^ For albums certified Disco de platino before December 20, 2013.[15]
  2. ^ Since September 7, 1992[4]
  3. ^ a b c The record labels and release dates are those given by the RIAA.[20]
  4. ^ The charts are those given by Billboard magazine.[21]

References

  1. ^ a b "Billboard's Latin Charts Switch to SoundScan". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media: 4, 71. July 10, 1993. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ Cobo, Leila (January 5, 2012). "Latin Sales Down Slightly In 2011, Digital Latin Sales Up". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2015.
  3. ^ Valdes-Rodriguez, Alisa (December 26, 1999). "The Loud and Quiet Explosions". Los Angeles Times. Tribune Company. Retrieved 2015.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag Estevez, Marjua (October 17, 2017). "The Top 25 Biggest Selling Latin Albums of the Last 25 Years: Selena, Shakira & More". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ Lannert, John (September 2, 1995). "The Selena Phenomenon". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 107 (35): 41. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ "1995 Top Billboard Latin 50 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 31, 1995. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013.
  7. ^ "1996 Top Billboard Latin 50 Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. December 31, 1996. Archived from the original on January 20, 2013.
  8. ^ "Billboard Methodology". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Archived from the original on February 9, 2008. Retrieved 2009.
  9. ^ Lang, George (June 29, 2001). "SoundScan shines light of truth on album sales". The Oklahoman. Retrieved 2017.
  10. ^ Valdes-Rodriguez, Alisa (December 10, 1999). "Latin Music: Bigger Than Reported?". Los Angeles Times. Tronc. Retrieved 2018.
  11. ^ "About RIAA". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2017.
  12. ^ a b "Story of Gold & Platinum". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2017.
  13. ^ Spanos, Brittany (February 1, 2016). "RIAA to Count Streaming Towards Album Certifications". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 2017.
  14. ^ Lannert, John (February 5, 2000). "RIAA Creates Latin Market Certifications". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 112 (6): 12, 93. Retrieved 2013.
  15. ^ a b "RIAA Updates Latin Gold & Platinum Program". Recording Industry Association of America. December 20, 2013. Retrieved 2017.
  16. ^ Brennan, Sandra. "Luis Miguel". AllMusic. Rovi Corporation. Archived from the original on 26 August 2013. Retrieved 2014.
  17. ^ "1998: The Year in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 110 (52): YE-70. December 26, 1998. Retrieved 2013.
  18. ^ "1999: The Year in Music". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 111 (52): YE-72. December 25, 1999. Retrieved 2013.
  19. ^ "Gold & Platinum: Diamante Awards". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2017.
  20. ^ "RIAA - Gold & Platinum Searchable Database". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 2017.
  21. ^ "Latin Albums". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2013.


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