Lancaster County, South Carolina
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Lancaster County, South Carolina
Lancaster County, South Carolina
Lancaster County Courthouse (Built 1828), Lancaster, South Carolina.jpg
Lancaster County Courthouse
Map of South Carolina highlighting Lancaster County
Location within the U.S. state of South Carolina
Map of the United States highlighting South Carolina
South Carolina's location within the U.S.
Founded1785
SeatLancaster
Largest cityLancaster
Area
 o Total555 sq mi (1,437 km2)
 o Land549 sq mi (1,422 km2)
 o Water6.0 sq mi (16 km2), 1.1%
Population (est.)
 o (2018)95,380
 o Density140/sq mi (50/km2)
Congressional district5th
Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Websitemylancastersc.org

Lancaster County is a county located in the U.S. state of South Carolina. As of the 2017 census estimate, its population was 92,550.[1] Its county seat is Lancaster, which has an urban population of 23,979.[2] The county was created in 1785.[3]

Lancaster County is included in the Charlotte-Concord-Gastonia, NC-SC Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is located in the Piedmont region.

History

For hundreds of years, the Catawba Indians occupied what became organized as Lancaster County as part of their historic tribal lands. The Siouan-speaking Catawba were once considered one of the most powerful Southeastern tribes. The Catawba and other Siouan peoples are believed to have emerged and coalesced as individual tribes in the Southeast. Primarily sedentary, cultivating their own crops, the Catawba were friendly toward the early European colonists.

When the first Anglo-Europeans reached this area in the early 1750s, they settled between Rum Creek and Twelve Mile Creek. Waxhaw Creek within this area was named after the Waxhaw Indian tribe that was prominent in the region. The majority of the new settlers were Scots-Irish who had migrated from Pennsylvania, where they had landed in Philadelphia. Other Scots-Irish from the backcountry of North Carolina and Virginia joined them. A significant minority of the population was German.

Many of the early settlers migrated to South Carolina from Lancaster, Lancashire. They had named their county for the House of Lancaster, which had opposed the House of York in the struggles of 1455-85, known as the War of the Roses. The House of Lancaster chose the red rose as their emblem while their neighbor, York County, boasts the white rose.

A second settlement was made in the lower part of the present Lancaster County on Hanging Rock Creek. The South Carolina colony first made a grant to settlers there in 1752; it included the overhanging mass of rock for which the creek was named. About the time the colony opened up this section, other settlers came in and settled along Lynches Creek, Little Lynches creek, Flat Creek, Beaver Creek, and lower Camp Creek. In coming to the Lancaster area, the first settlers followed old Indian paths. The increased traffic began to enlarge the paths and improve them as dirt roads.

The Rocky River Road was also based on an Indian path. During the American Revolutionary War, Colonel Abraham Buford and his forces fled from Tarleton along this road. He was overtaken a few miles south of the North Carolina state line, where the Patriot forces were defeated in the Battle of Waxhaws. Locals call it Bufords Massacre. Today, the Rocky River Road has been absorbed by part of South Carolina Highway 522, which was constructed following the old thoroughfare very closely.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 555 square miles (1,440 km2), of which 549 square miles (1,420 km2) is land and 6.0 square miles (16 km2) (1.1%) is water.[4] It is bounded on the west by the Catawba River and Sugar Creek and on the east by the Lynches River.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

2000 census

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 61,351 people, 23,178 households, and 16,850 families residing in the county. The population density was 112 inhabitants per square mile (43/km2). There were 24,962 housing units at an average density of 46 per square mile (18/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 71.03% White American, 26.86% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.27% Asian American, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.89% from other races, and 0.71% from two or more races. 1.59% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 23,178 households out of which 33.40% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.60% were married couples living together, 15.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 23.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.40% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.56 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the county, the population was spread out with 25.40% under the age of 18, 8.60% from 18 to 24, 30.30% from 25 to 44, 23.60% from 45 to 64, and 12.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.20 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,688, and the median income for a family was $40,955. Males had a median income of $30,176 versus $22,238 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,276. About 9.70% of families and 12.80% of the population were below the poverty threshold, including 16.50% of those under age 18 and 15.80% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 76,652 people, 29,697 households, and 21,122 families residing in the county.[11] The population density was 139.6 inhabitants per square mile (53.9/km2). There were 32,687 housing units at an average density of 59.5 per square mile (23.0/km2).[12] The racial makeup of the county was 71.5% white, 23.8% black or African American, 0.6% Asian, 0.3% American Indian, 2.4% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 4.4% of the population.[11] In terms of ancestry, 23.9% were American, 8.0% were Irish, 7.6% were English, and 7.2% were German.[13]

Of the 29,697 households, 33.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.0% were married couples living together, 15.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 28.9% were non-families, and 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 2.97. The median age was 39.7 years.[11]

The median income for a household in the county was $38,959 and the median income for a family was $46,388. Males had a median income of $39,681 versus $28,985 for females. The per capita income for the county was $19,308. About 15.8% of families and 20.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 30.2% of those under age 18 and 11.2% of those age 65 or over.[14]

Communities

City

Towns

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Politics

Presidential election results
Presidential election results[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 60.9% 23,719 35.5% 13,812 3.6% 1,407
2012 58.3% 19,333 40.5% 13,419 1.2% 392
2008 56.9% 16,441 42.0% 12,139 1.2% 341
2004 62.1% 12,916 36.7% 7,631 1.3% 267
2000 56.4% 11,676 42.4% 8,782 1.2% 247
1996 42.0% 7,544 48.7% 8,752 9.3% 1,661
1992 41.6% 7,757 44.5% 8,307 13.9% 2,591
1988 59.5% 9,152 40.2% 6,181 0.4% 60
1984 63.9% 10,383 35.7% 5,804 0.4% 57
1980 42.3% 6,410 54.6% 8,283 3.1% 477
1976 37.3% 4,997 62.2% 8,324 0.5% 64
1972 77.9% 9,016 21.3% 2,461 0.9% 103
1968 37.8% 4,874 24.4% 3,151 37.8% 4,886
1964 48.8% 4,742 51.2% 4,970
1960 34.3% 2,909 65.7% 5,561
1956 24.3% 1,610 66.3% 4,398 9.5% 629
1952 38.2% 3,080 61.8% 4,989
1948 1.2% 30 33.7% 855 65.1% 1,649
1944 0.5% 13 94.0% 2,383 5.5% 140
1940 0.4% 14 99.6% 3,205
1936 0.0% 0 100.0% 2,631
1932 0.2% 5 99.8% 3,103
1928 0.6% 8 99.5% 1,436
1924 0.6% 8 99.4% 1,355
1920 0.6% 10 99.4% 1,633
1916 0.1% 1 99.9% 1,426 0.1% 1
1912 0.5% 6 99.0% 1,140 0.4% 5
1904 4.4% 69 95.6% 1,504
1900 5.1% 70 94.9% 1,300

Notable residents/natives

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 6, 2011. Retrieved 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Retrieved .
  3. ^ "South Carolina: Individual County Chronologies". South Carolina Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2009. Retrieved 2015.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved 2015.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  11. ^ a b c "DP-1 Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  12. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  13. ^ "DP02 SELECTED SOCIAL CHARACTERISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES - 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  14. ^ "DP03 SELECTED ECONOMIC CHARACTERISTICS - 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved .
  15. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved .
  16. ^ Born in the Waxhaw region on the North Carolina-South Carolina border. Exactly on which side of the border Jackson was born is in dispute. Jackson himself considered South Carolina as his birth state, and that is how it is most frequently listed. https://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2011/03/06/AR2011030603406.html?wprss=rss_print/asection

External links

Coordinates: 34°41?N 80°42?W / 34.69°N 80.70°W / 34.69; -80.70


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Lancaster_County,_South_Carolina
 



 



 
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