Lafayette High School (Lexington, Kentucky)
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Lafayette High School Lexington, Kentucky

Lafayette High School
The front facade of a two-story brick building with a white cupola
Lafayette in August 2019
Address
401 Reed Ln[1]

,
40503

United States
Coordinates38°01?30?N 84°31?30?W / 38.025°N 84.525°W / 38.025; -84.525Coordinates: 38°01?30?N 84°31?30?W / 38.025°N 84.525°W / 38.025; -84.525
Information
School typePublic, High school
Founded1939
PrincipalBryne Jacobs (2018)
Teaching staff118.17 (FTE)
Enrollment2440 (2017-18 AY)
 o Grade 928.91%
 o Grade 1025.75%
 o Grade 1123.76%
 o Grade 1221.36%
Student to teacher ratio18.70:1
Schedule typeBlock scheduling
ACT average22 (2017-18 AY)[2]
NewspaperThe Lafayette Times[3]
Website
Blason fam fr Motier de La Fayette.svg
Coat of arms of the house of La Fayette
(Gules, a bend or, with a bordure vair)

Lafayette High School is a public high school in Lexington, Kentucky that has been open for 80 years, seen the beginning of racially-desegregated education in the city, and been overseen by eight principals.

History

Founded in 1939 to replace Picadome High School, Lafayette High School was built on the grounds of a former orphanage[3] with funding from the Works Progress Administration. The school was named for Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette; the French general's family gave the school permission to use their family coat of arms as a logo.[4] The school shared its property with a mansion--The Elms--until the latter burned down a few months into the first school year. In 1955, Lafayette was the first white school in Lexington to be racially integrated[3] when Helen Caise Wade (a student at Lexington's all-black Douglass High School) took a summer school course in US history.[5]

Dwight Price (born 1930 or 1931) was principal from 1972–87.[3] After its comprehensive 1998 building renovation,[4] Lafayette implemented block scheduling beginning with the 2000-01 academic year.[2] In 2012, the school received its eighth principal: Memphis, Tennessee-native and University of Kentucky graduate Bryne Jacobs (born 1978 or 1979). Jacobs previously worked at Lexington's Paul Laurence Dunbar High School from 2000–12,[3] and was still at Lafayette through at least the 2017-18 academic year.[3] Renovation of the school's stadium was completed in 2010.[4]

Part of the Fayette County Public Schools school district, Lafayette had 2210 enrolled students across grades 9-12 in the 2016-17 academic year (639 freshmen, 569 sophomores, 525 juniors, and 472 seniors). With 118.17 full-time equivalent teachers, the student-to-teacher ratio was 18.70:1. Of the student body, 0.05% were Native American, 4.84% were Asian, 15.93% were Black, 6.11% were Hispanic, 0.09% were Pacific Islanders, 70.00% were White, and 2.99% were multiracial.[1] By the next year, enrollment had increased by 10.41% to 2440, and the student body had become 68.1% White, 12.3% African American, 10.9% Hispanic, and 8.7% other ethnicities.[2]

Academics

Lafayette's northwest wing

As of the 2017-18 academic year, Lafayette offered two specialized programs for its students: the School for the Creative and Performing Arts (SCAPA) and the Pre-Engineering Program. SCAPA was "designed for students who excel in art, ballet, band, contemporary dance, creative writing, drama, piano, strings, and voice", and required an audition to be considered for the program. The latter offering was a program "designed to provide students with the skills needed to succeed in such mathematically rigorous and technical fields as engineering, architecture, medicine, computer programming, mathematics, biology, chemistry and physics."[2]

Extracurriculars

The Lafayette boys' basketball team won the Sweet Sixteen championship in 1942, 1950, 1953, 1957, 1979, and 2001.[6] The baseball team won the state championship in 1988, 1989, and 1992.[7] The Lafayette marching band was awarded The Sudler Shield by the John Philip Sousa Foundation in 1991 and 1998.[8]

Notable alumni

References

  1. ^ a b "Lafayette High School (210186000367)". National Center for Education Statistics. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d "Our School / About the School". Fayette County Public Schools. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Eblen, Tom (April 21, 2015). "Lafayette High students, alumni celebrate 75th anniversary this weekend". Lexington Herald-Leader. ISSN 0745-4260. Archived from the original on September 17, 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  4. ^ a b c "Our School / School History". Fayette County Public Schools. Archived from the original on August 13, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  5. ^ Lane, Tammy L. (March 1, 2010). "Woman who broke color barrier visits Rosa Parks". Fayette County Public Schools. Archived from the original on June 22, 2017. Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ "KHSAA Boys' Sweet 16® All-Time Winners" (PDF). Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ "Baseball All-time Titles by School" (PDF). Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 2019. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  8. ^ "Previous Recipients of the Sudler Shield Award". John Philip Sousa Foundation. Archived from the original on March 27, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  9. ^ Pulver, Andrew (September 15, 2017). "Harry Dean Stanton, cult American actor, dies aged 91". The Guardian. ISSN 1756-3224. OCLC 60623878. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019. Prolific character actor, who appeared in scores of films including Paris, Texas, Alien, Repo Man and The Straight Story, died in an LA hospital on Friday
  10. ^ "1967 Masters champion Brewer dies at 75 from lung cancer". Lexington, Kentucky: PGA Tour. Associated Press. August 31, 2007. Archived from the original on September 4, 2007. Retrieved 2019.
  11. ^ "John Y. Brown Jr". National Governors Association. Archived from the original on June 30, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "Thomas T. Hammond". University of Kentucky College of Agriculture, Food, and Environment. Archived from the original on July 3, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  13. ^ "Gatewood Galbraith Dies At 64". WLEX. Associated Press. January 4, 2012. Archived from the original on January 8, 2012. Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ Tuohy, Lynne (January 5, 2013). "Lexington's Gene Robinson, the first gay Anglican bishop, is retiring". Lexington Herald-Leader. Concord, New Hampshire. Associated Press. ISSN 0745-4260. Archived from the original on July 2, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  15. ^ "Jim Varney". Biography. Archived from the original on August 12, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ "Ernie Fletcher". National Governors Association. Archived from the original on June 30, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  17. ^ "Dirk Minniefield Stats". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on July 31, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ "Austin Kearns Stats". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on March 26, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  19. ^ Connelly, Tom (August 2, 2008). "Athlete Bio: Tyson Gay". The New York Times. Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ISSN 1553-8095. OCLC 1645522. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved 2019.

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Lafayette_High_School_(Lexington,_Kentucky)
 



 



 
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