Kristoff St. John
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Kristoff St. John

Kristoff St. John
Kristoff St. John (46716837661).jpg
St. John in 2000
Born(1966-07-15)July 15, 1966
DiedFebruary 3, 2019(2019-02-03) (aged 52)
Resting placeValley Oaks Memorial Park, Westlake Village, California, U.S.
Other namesChristoff St. John
Years active1975-2019
Known forRoots: The Next Generations
Generations
The Young and the Restless
(m. 1991; div. 1995)
Allana Nadal
(m. 2001; div. 2007)
Children3
Parent(s)Christopher St. John

Kristoff St. John (July 15, 1966 - February 3, 2019) was an American actor. From 1991 to 2019, St. John portrayed the role of Neil Winters on CBS daytime soap opera The Young and the Restless, which earned him eleven Daytime Emmy Award nominations, two Emmy Awards, and ten NAACP Image Awards.

Early life

Kristoff St. John was born July 15, 1966, in New York City and grew up in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and Los Angeles. His father, Christopher St. John, is a producer, actor and director, while his mother, Marie, is an entertainer.[1]

Career

As a ten-year-old child, St. John had a featuring role on the Saturday-morning comedy Big John, Little John, broadcast on NBC in 1976. St. John portrayed a young Alex Haley in the 1979 ABC miniseries Roots: The Next Generations.[2] He also made a small appearance as Booker Brown on the ABC sitcom Happy Days,[3] as well as a boyfriend of Denise Huxtable on an early episode of The Cosby Show.[4] In his first major role, he appeared as Charlie Richmond Jr. in the 1985 CBS sitcom Charlie & Co.[5]

St. John's first major soap role was Adam Marshall on the NBC soap opera, Generations. After the show's cancellation in 1991, he originated the role of Neil Winters on The Young and the Restless, and played the character for 25 years;[6] no African American actor had appeared on the series more frequently than St. John. In 1992, he won the Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Younger Actor in a Drama Series for his role. On September 5, 1994, he hosted CBS Soap Break.[7]

In 2005, St. John became a special host for TV Guide Channel. In 2007, he received his fifth Daytime Emmy nomination. He was nominated for Outstanding Supporting Actor. In 2008, St. John won his second Daytime Emmy, as Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series.[8]

In 2014, A Man Called God, a documentary that St. John co-directed with his father Christopher St. John, debuted at the San Diego Black Film Festival.[9] The film was awarded there, and at other festivals such as the American Documentary Film Festival, and the Beverly Hills Film Festival.[10]

Kristoff's final appearance as Neil aired on February 6, 2019.[11] Late in April, it was revealed that Neil had died of a stroke.[12]

Personal life

St. John was married and divorced twice. He had a son, Julian (1989-2014) and a daughter, Paris Nicole (born 1992) with his first wife, boxer Mia St. John. Julian died by suicide on November 23, 2014, following a long history of mental illness.[13] St. John was married to Allana Nadal from 2001 to 2007, and they had a daughter, Lola (born April 15, 2003).[14] On August 31, 2018, he was engaged to Russian model Kseniya Olegovna Mikhaleva.[15]

St. John was a vegan and animal rights advocate; he appeared in two PETA ad campaigns.[16]

St. John died at his Los Angeles, California home on February 3, 2019, at the age of 52.[17][18][19] His death was ruled accidental with the cause listed as hypertrophic heart failure.[20]

Filmography

Year Title Role Notes
1975 That's My Mama Andy Episode: "Weekend Daddy"[6]
1976-1977 Big John, Little John Homer 11 episodes[21]
1976 Happy Days Booker Brown Episode: "Football Frolics"
1977 Wonder Woman Linc Episode: "The Bushwhackers", (as Christoff St. John)
The San Pedro Beach Bums Ralphie [22]
1979 The Champ Sonny [6]
Roots: The Next Generations Young Alex Haley 26 episodes, (as Christoff St. John)
1979-1980 The Bad News Bears Ahmad Abdul Rahim 26 episodes, (as Christoff St. John)[1]
1982 Sister, Sister Daniel "Danny" Burton TV movie
1984 The Cosby Show David James Episode: "How Ugly Is He?"[6]
1985-1986 Charlie & Co. Charlie Richmond Jr. 18 episodes[21]
1988 A Different World E.Z. Brooks Episode: "Advise and Descent"[6]
1989-1991 Generations Adam Marshall 208 episodes[21]
1989 Finish Line Tito Landreau TV movie
1991-2019 The Young and the Restless Neil Winters Series regular[21]
1995 CBS Soap Break Host [21]
Hangin' with Mr. Cooper Eric 6 episodes[21]
1996 Martin Fred Livingston Episode: "Kicked to the Curb"[6]
The Crew Darnell Episodes: "Winds of Change" Parts 1 & 2
1997 The Jamie Foxx Show Morris Episode: "Break Yourself, Fool"[6]
Living Single Norwood Episode: "Reconcilable Differences"[21]
The Nanny Himself
1998 Family Matters D'Andre Episode: "Throw Urkel from the Train"[1]
2002 Trois 2: Pandora's Box Victor DuBois [6]
2005 Carpool Guy Steven
2007 Spiritual Warriors Hospital Administrator
2009 Everybody Hates Chris Himself Episode: "Everybody Hates Spring Break"
2013 20 Feet Below: The Darkness Descending Smitty
2014 A Man Called God Director Documentary film co-directed with Christopher St. John
2017 A Christmas Cruise Jake TV movie
2019 Home Is Where The Killer Is Dr. Fredericks (final film role)

Awards

Year Award Work Result Ref
1985 Young Artist Award for Best Young Actor Starring in a New Television Series Charlie & Co. Nominated
1990 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series Generations Nominated [23]
1991 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Younger Actor in a Drama Series Generations Nominated [24]
1992 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Younger Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [25]
1993 Soap Opera Digest Award for Outstanding Younger Leading Actor The Young and the Restless Nominated
1993 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [26]
1994 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [27]
1996 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [28]
1997 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won
1998 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
1999 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2000 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2001 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2002 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2003 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won
2003 Soap Opera Digest Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor The Young and the Restless Nominated
2004 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won
2005 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2006 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated
2007 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won
2007 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated [29]
2008 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [30]
2008 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won
2013 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [31]
2014 NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Actor in a Daytime Drama Series The Young and the Restless Won [32]
2015 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated [33]
2016 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated [34]
2017 Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Lead Actor in a Drama Series The Young and the Restless Nominated [35]

References

  1. ^ a b c Slotnik, Daniel E. (February 4, 2019). "Kristoff St. John, a Fixture of Daytime TV, Is Dead at 52". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ Daniel Wilcox & Thad Mumford (writers); Georg Stanford Brown (director) (February 22, 1979). "Part 5". Roots: The Next Generations. ABC.
  3. ^ James Ritz (writer); Jerry Paris (director) (January 20, 1976). "Football Frolics". Happy Days. Season 3. Episode 18. ABC.
  4. ^ John Markus (writer); Jay Sandrich (director) (November 15, 1984). "How Ugly Is He?". The Cosby Show. Season 1. Episode 9. NBC.
  5. ^ Petski, Denise (February 4, 2019). "Kristoff St. John Dies: 'The Young & The Restless' Actor Was 52". Deadline. Retrieved 2019.
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h Rubin, Rebecca (February 4, 2019). "'Young and the Restless' Star Kristoff St. John Dies at 52". Variety. Retrieved 2019.
  7. ^ Brennan, Carol. "St. John, Kristoff 1966-." Contemporary Black Biography, edited by David G. Oblender, vol. 25, Gale, 2000, pp. 156-158. Gale eBooks. Accessed 12 Aug. 2020.
  8. ^ "Kristoff St. John's last soap episode airs Wednesday". ABC News. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ Clifford, Kambra (January 30, 2014). "CENTER STAGE: 'Y&R's' Kristoff St. John On His Shocking New Documentary... And Whether or Not Neil Will Make It Down the Aisle!". Soap Opera Network. Retrieved 2020.
  10. ^ Clifford, Kembra (April 30, 2014). "Kristoff St. John's Documentary Nabs Prestigious Awards". Soap Opera Network. Retrieved 2020.
  11. ^ Arnowitz, Leora; Thompson, Julia (February 6, 2019). "Kristoff St. John's final 'Young and the Restless' scene airs, leaving fans in tears". USA Today. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ Reichardt, Nancy (April 25, 2019). "'Days': Hector? Darn Near Killed 'er!". uexpress.
  13. ^ "Kristoff St. John's Son Julian Dead at 24". Soaps.sheknows.com. November 29, 2014.
  14. ^ "My Lil Lola Lemon is Officially a Teenager Today". Instagram.com. April 15, 2016.
  15. ^ Pasquini, Maria (September 3, 2018). "The Young and the Restless Star Kristoff St. John Is Engaged to Russian Model Kseniya Mikhaleva". People. Retrieved 2019.
  16. ^ "Taking it Off for PETA". SoapOperaDigest.com. July 12, 2004.
  17. ^ "Beloved Y&R Star Kristoff St. John Dies". Soap Opera Digest. Odyssey Magazine Publishing Group Inc. American Media, Inc. February 4, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  18. ^ Corinthios, Aurelie (February 4, 2019). "Young and the Restless Star Kristoff St. John Dead at 52: Report". People. Retrieved 2019.
  19. ^ Reed, Anika (February 4, 2019). "'Young and the Restless' star Kristoff St. John dead at 52, cause 'deferred'". USA Today. Retrieved 2019.
  20. ^ Schnurr, Samantha (March 19, 2019). "Kristoff St. John's Cause of Death Revealed". E! Online. Retrieved 2019.
  21. ^ a b c d e f g "Kristoff St. John". TV Guide. Retrieved 2019.
  22. ^ Respers, Lisa (February 4, 2019). "Kristoff St. John, star of 'Young & the Restless,' dead at 52". CNN. Retrieved 2019.
  23. ^ Goudas, John N. (May 26, 1990). "Emmy nominees announced". TimesDaily. Florence, Alabama: Tennessee Valley Printing Co. p. 70. Retrieved 2013.
  24. ^ "1991 Emmy Winners & Nominees". Soap Opera Digest. New York City: American Media, Inc. Archived from the original on August 18, 2004. Retrieved 2013.
  25. ^ "CBS Takes Home Most Daytime Emmys : Television: 'All My Children's' Susan Lucci, nominated 13 times, gets a standing ovation--but no best actress award". Los Angeles Times. Associated Press. June 25, 1992. ISSN 0458-3035. Retrieved 2019.
  26. ^ "1993 Image Award Winners". UPI.com. January 17, 1993. Retrieved 2016.
  27. ^ "1994 Image Award Winners". IMDb. Retrieved 2016.
  28. ^ Snow, Shauna (February 22, 1996). "5 Films Head Nominations for NAACP Image Awards". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2017.
  29. ^ Bonawitz, Amy (February 11, 2009). "34th Annual Daytime Emmy Winners". CBS News. Retrieved 2013.
  30. ^ Silverman, Stephen M. (June 21, 2008). "Ellen DeGeneres, Tyra Banks Win Daytime Emmys". People. New York City. Archived from the original on March 18, 2018. Retrieved 2013.
  31. ^ Couch, Aaron (February 1, 2013). "2013 Image Winners". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2016.
  32. ^ Couch, Aaron (February 22, 2014). "2014 Image Winners". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved 2016.
  33. ^ "The 42nd Annual Daytime Emmy Award Nominations" (PDF). New York City: emmyonline.org and National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. March 31, 2015. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 2, 2015. Retrieved 2015.
  34. ^ "The 43rd Annual Daytime Emmy Award Nominations" (PDF). New York City: emmyonline.org and National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. March 24, 2016. Archived (PDF) from the original on April 17, 2016. Retrieved 2016.
  35. ^ "The 44th Annual Daytime Emmy Award Nominations" (PDF). New York City: emmyonline.org and National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. March 22, 2017. Retrieved 2017.

External links


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