Ken Inglis
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Ken Inglis

Ken Inglis

Born(1929-10-07)7 October 1929
Died1 December 2017(2017-12-01) (aged 88)
AwardsFellow of the Academy of the Social Sciences in Australia (1975)
Fellowship of Australian Writers National Literacy Award (1998)
Sir Ernest Scott Prize (1999)
The Age Book of the Year (1999)
The Age Non-fiction Award (1999)
New South Wales Premier's Australian History Prize (1999)
Officer of the Order of Australia (2003)
Academic background
Alma materUniversity of Melbourne (BA [Hons], MA)
University of Oxford (DPhil)
Academic work
InstitutionsAustralian National University
University of Papua New Guinea
University of Adelaide
Main interestsAustralian history
Military history, memory and memorialisation
Notable worksSacred Places (1998)

Kenneth Stanley Inglis, AO, FASSA (7 October 1929 - 1 December 2017) was an Australian historian.

Inglis completed his Master's degree at the University of Melbourne and his doctorate at the University of Oxford. In 1956 he was appointed as a lecturer to the University of Adelaide. He subsequently became Professor of History at the Australian National University, and the University of Papua New Guinea.[1]

Inglis has written extensively on the Anzac tradition, the Stuart Case, war memorials, and the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.[1] In 2008 he joined the Faculty of Arts at Monash University, Melbourne, as an Adjunct Professor.[2]

Inglis died, aged 88, on 1 December 2017.[3]

Early life and education

Inglis was born in the Melbourne suburb of Ivanhoe, Victoria, on 7 October 1929, the son of Stan and Rene Inglis. He was educated at Tyler Street Public School, Northcote Boys' High School and Melbourne High School, before going to study at the University of Melbourne. Inglis participated in the Student Christian Movement and amateur dramatics during his studies, and worked as a tutor at Ormond College. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts with first class honours in History and English, he read for a Master of Arts at Melbourne. Inglis' thesis, which was a history of the Royal Melbourne Hospital, was later revised and published as his first book, Hospital and Community (Melbourne University Press, 1958).[4][5]

Awards

The book also won the:

  • NSW Premier's Literary Awards History Prize 1999
  • FAW Literature Award 1998
  • Ernest Scott History Prize 1999
  • Centre for Australian Cultural Studies Award, Individual Prize 1999.[6]

Bibliography

Books

  • — (1958). Hospital and Community: A History of the Royal Melbourne Hospital. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press.
  • — (1961). The Stuart Case. Kingsgrove, New South Wales: Halstead Press.
    • — (2002). The Stuart Case (2nd ed.). Melbourne: Black Inc. ISBN 1863952438.
  • — (1963). Churches and the Working Classes in Victorian England. London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. ISBN 0710045565.
  • — (1970). C. E. W. Bean, Australian historian. St. Lucia: University of Queensland Press. ISBN 0702205834.
  • — (1974). The Australian Colonists: An Exploration of Social History, 1788-1870. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522840728.
    • — (1993). The Australian Colonists: An Exploration of Social History, 1788-1870 (2nd ed.). Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522845266.
  • — (1983). This Is the ABC: The Australian Broadcasting Commission, 1932-1983. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522842585.
    • — (2006). This Is the ABC: The Australian Broadcasting Commission, 1932-1983 (2nd ed.). Melbourne: Black Inc. ISBN 9781863951814.
  • — (1985). The Rehearsal: Australians at War in the Sudan, 1885. Adelaide: Rigby. ISBN 0727020811.
  • — (1998). Lack, John (ed.). Anzac Remembered: Selected Writings by K. S. Inglis. Parkville, Victoria: Department of History, University of Melbourne. ISBN 0732515505.
  • — (1998). Sacred Places: War Memorials in the Australian Landscape. Carlton, Victoria: Miegunyah Press at Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522847528.
    • — (2001). Sacred Places: War Memorials in the Australian Landscape (2nd ed.). Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522849768.
    • — (2005). Sacred Places: War Memorials in the Australian Landscape (New ed.). Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Publishing. ISBN 0522851908.
    • — (2008). Sacred Places: War Memorials in the Australian Landscape (3rd ed.). Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Publishing. ISBN 9780522854794.
  • — (1999). Wilcox, Craig (ed.). Observing Australia, 1959-1999. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 0522848664.
  • — (2006). Whose ABC?: The Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 1983-2006. Melbourne: Black Inc. ISBN 9781863951890.
  • —; Spark, Seumas; Winter, Jay (2018). Dunera Lives: A Visual History. Volume 1. Clayton: Melbourne University Publishing. ISBN 9781925495492.

Edited books

  • —, ed. (1989). Nation: The Life of an Independent Journal of Opinion, 1958-1972. Carlton, Victoria: Melbourne University Press. ISBN 052284412X.

References

  1. ^ a b "Kenneth Stanley Inglis, 1929- Lectures in history, University of Adelaide 1956-59 MSS 0067". University Library: Access to Manuscript Collections. University of Adelaide. 2006. Archived from the original on 13 August 2007. Retrieved 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ "Associate Staff Profiles". History. 17 October 2014. Retrieved 2016.
  3. ^ "Historian Ken Inglis dies, aged 88". The Australian. 3 December 2017. Retrieved 2017.
  4. ^ Frances, Raelene; Scates, Bruce (2018). "Kenneth Stanley Inglis AO (1929-2017)". Australian Historical Studies. 49 (3): 410-412. doi:10.1080/1031461X.2018.1493961.
  5. ^ Stephens, Tony (16 January 2018). "Ken Inglis, Anzac Historian, Foremost a Storyteller". Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ a b "Award Winning Titles". Melbourne University Press. Archived from the original on 23 March 2008. Retrieved 2008. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)



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