Industrial Techno
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Industrial Techno

Industrial techno is a subgenre of techno and industrial dance music that originated in the 1990s.[1] Characteristically, it incorporates influences from the bleak, noisy sound and aesthetics of early industrial music acts, particularly Cabaret Voltaire and Throbbing Gristle.[2][1] American industrial music label Wax Trax! also had a profound influence over the genre's development.[3] The genre has seen a resurgence in the 2010s,[1][2] spearheaded by acts such as Adam X, Orphx, and Ancient Methods, and others later like Blawan and Karenn. As a result, it has gained a significant fanbase from the post-dubstep audience.[2] It is not to be mistaken with Techno Industrial, which is in essence similar to the power noise/rhythmic noise subgenre. The different terminology is used depending if one is coming from a techno perspective or industrial perspective, with Industrial Techno having more techno-inspired rhythmic section with lots of reverb and wall-of-noise or sci-fi effects, while Techno Industrial is closer to rythmic noise in composition, with a distorted rhythmic section.

Other artists associated with industrial techno include Cut Hands,[1]Helena Hauff,[4] Forward Strategy Group,[1]Surgeon,[2] Michael Forshaw,[5]Jeff Mills, Regis, Dominick Fernow and Mike Banks.[6] Perc Trax record label has been credited with the revival of the genre in the UK, with artists such as Perc, Truss and Ansome.[1]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f Turner, Luke. "The new wave of British industrial techno ... and you can dance to it". The Guardian. Retrieved 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d Finlayson, Angus (13 February 2013). "The industrial techno revolution". Resident Advisor. Retrieved 2017.
  3. ^ Lien, James (January 1995). "Various artists - Blackbox". CMJ (17): 44.
  4. ^ Carroll, Jim (18 September 2015). "Helena Hauff: Discreet Desires". The Irish Times. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ Muggs, Joe (19 February 2014). "There Is No "Revival", Industrial Techno Has Always Been Banging Party Music". Vice. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ Collins, Nick; Schedel, Margaret; Wilson, Scott (2013). Electronic Music. Cambridge University. p. 108. ISBN 1107244544.

See also


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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