Hunter Brothers
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Hunter Brothers
Hunter Brothers
Origin Shaunavon, Saskatchewan, Canada
Genres Country
2016-present
Labels Open Road Recordings
Website www.hunterbrothers.com
Members Luke Hunter
J.J. Hunter
Ty Hunter
Brock Hunter
Dusty Hunter

Hunter Brothers is a Canadian country music group from Shaunavon, Saskatchewan[1][2] composed of brothers Luke, J.J., Ty, Brock and Dusty Hunter.[3][4] They signed with Open Road Recordings and released their debut single, "El Dorado", in February 2016.[5][6] It debuted on the Billboard Canada Country chart in March 2016.[7] The band earned their first Top 10 single at Canadian country radio with their hit "Born and Raised".[8]

Discography

Studio albums

Title Details
Getaway[9]

Singles

Year Single Peak
positions
Album
CAN
Country

[7]
2016 "El Dorado" 25 Getaway
"Long Way to Love You" 40
2017 "Getaway" 31
"Born and Raised" 9

Other charted songs

Year Single Peak
positions
Album
CAN
Country

[7]
2017 "Joy to the World" 46 Non-album single

Music videos

Year Video Director
2016 "El Dorado" Shaun Silva
"Long Way to Love You" Chris Hicky
2017 "Getaway" Wes Edwards
"Born and Raised" Gavin Michael Booth

Background

The Hunter brothers were born to parents Lorne and Norma Hunter.[10] Their uncle is Canadian olympic skier Jim Hunter.[11] The brothers had a Christian upbringing[11] and sang gospel music.[10]

Hockey careers

Four of the five brothers played junior ice hockey and three played in the professional minor leagues. J.J., Dustin, and Luke each played forward, while Brock and Ty were defencemen. Ty played rep hockey before suffering a broken femur.[10] The remaining four brothers all sustained injuries of various kinds and returned home to continue farming with their parents on their family's 20,000 acre farm.[11]

J.J. Hunter played three seasons in Western Hockey League with the Kelowna Rockets and Prince Albert Raiders; he attended 6 NHL training camps ('99 Detroit Redwings, '01-'06 Edmonton Oilers) and was under contract with the Edmonton Oilers for 5 seasons playing NHL pre-season games and 5 years in their farm system. Altogether, he played 6 years of pro-hockey including parts of six seasons in the American Hockey League with the Hamilton Bulldogs, Toronto Roadrunners, Edmonton Road Runners, Toronto Marlies and Manitoba Moose; and parts of four season in the ECHL with the Toledo Storm and Columbus Cottonmouths.[12]

Dustin Hunter played junior hockey with the Melville Millionaires in the Saskatchewan Junior Hockey League, then one professional season split between the Oklahoma City Blazers and San Angelo Saints in the Central Hockey League before his career was abruptly ended due to a severe eye injury.[13]

Luke Hunter played five seasons in the WHL with the Swift Current Broncos, and one season each with the Wichita Thunder in the CHL, and the University of Calgary Dinos men's ice hockey team in the CIS.[14] His career also came to a halt due to an eye injury.

Brock Hunter played junior hockey in the AJHL with the Drumheller Dragons, and the Fort McMurray Oil Barons before finishing up his career with the Kindersley Klippers in the SJHL.[15]

All the brothers joined forces together when they returned home to play for the same hometown hockey team, the Shaunavon Badgers in the WMHL.

References

  1. ^ "Fresh Find: Hunter Brothers". Top Country. February 5, 2016. Retrieved 2016. 
  2. ^ Dahlman, Ryan (February 17, 2016). "Brothers hunting for mainstream success, but won't forget their roots". Prairie Post. Retrieved 2016. 
  3. ^ "From combine to recording studio: Sask.'s Hunter Brothers forge music career". CBC News. April 5, 2016. Retrieved 2016. 
  4. ^ Park, Norm (February 24, 2016). "Hunter Brothers seeking traction on country and western circuit". Estevan Mercury. Retrieved 2016. 
  5. ^ Jarrell, Beth (February 4, 2016). "Hunter Brothers ready to hit airwaves". Gull Lake Advance. Retrieved 2016. 
  6. ^ Schreiner, Penny (February 9, 2016). "New Single From The Hunter Brothers". Swift Current. Archived from the original on May 31, 2016. Retrieved 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c "Hunter Brothers Album & Song Chart History - Canada Country". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved 2016. 
  8. ^ "Top Country Charts: Hunter Brothers Earn Their First Top 10". Top Country Music | Country Music News, Charts, Playlists, Videos. 2018-01-02. Retrieved . 
  9. ^ "Hunter Brothers Drop Full Album Getaway and Corresponding Single Just in Time for Spring Break". Open Road Recordings. February 16, 2017. Retrieved 2017. 
  10. ^ a b c "Hunter Brothers seeking traction on country and western circuit". www.estevanmercury.ca. 2016-02-24. Retrieved . 
  11. ^ a b c "Canadian's hockey dreams lead to Las Vegas". www.lasvegassun.com/. 2008-10-04. Retrieved . 
  12. ^ "J.J. Hunter hockey statistics and profile". www.hockeydb.com. Retrieved . 
  13. ^ "Dustin Hunter hockey statistics and profile". www.hockeydb.com. Retrieved . 
  14. ^ "Luke Hunter hockey statistics and profile". www.hockeydb.com. Retrieved . 
  15. ^ "Brock Hunter hockey statistics and profile". www.hockeydb.com. Retrieved . 

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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