Hot Latin Songs
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Hot Latin Songs
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The Billboard Hot Latin Songs (formerly Hot Latin Tracks and Hot Latin 50) is a record chart in the United States for Latin singles, published weekly by Billboard magazine. Since October 2012, chart rankings are based on digital sales, radio airplay, and online streaming, and only predominantly Spanish-language songs are allowed to rank. The chart was established by the magazine on September 6, 1986 and was originally based on airplay on Latin music radio stations. Songs on the chart were not necessarily in Spanish language, since a few songs in English and Portuguese language have also charted.

The first number one song of the Hot Latin Songs chart was "La Guirnalda" by Rocío Dúrcal on September 6, 1986. As of the issue for the week ending on December 15, 2018, the chart has had 430 different number one hits, while 165 artists have reached number one (as a lead or a featured act). The current number one song is "Taki Taki" by DJ Snake featuring Selena Gomez, Ozuna and Cardi B.

History

On September 6, 1986, Billboard premiered a Latin music singles chart: the Hot Latin 50. During the 1980s decade, the data were compiled by the Billboard chart and research department with information from 70 Spanish-language radio stations in the United States and Puerto Rico.[1] Those radio stations were selected based on their number of listeners, and were asked to report their playlists for the week. This data was compiled by Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems, which electronically monitors radio stations in more than 120 music markets across the United States.[2] Before this chart's inception, the Latin music information on the magazine was presented only in the form of the biweekly album sales chart Top Latin Albums, which continues to be listed separately.[1] There were no language restrictions on the chart, since a few songs in English and Portuguese have charted and even reached number one on five occasions.

According to the Billboard electronic database, the first number one song on the Hot Latin 50 was "La Guirnalda" by Spanish singer Rocío Dúrcal on September 6, 1986.[3] However, in the listings included in the first printed publication of the chart on October 4, 1986, the first number-one song was "Yo No Sé Qué Me Pasó" by Mexican singer-songwriter Juan Gabriel.[4] In 2016, Billboard stated that the chart was introduced on the issue dated October 4, 1986, but the magazine's official website recognizes the previous issues from September 6, 1986 to September September 27, 1986, as well as Rocío Durcal's number one on the debut issue.[5][6][7][8][9]

In 1994, three charts were introduced in addition to Hot Latin Songs: Latin Pop Airplay, which deals with pop songs whether or not it is Spanish-language; Regional Mexican Airplay, which dealt with different styles of Mexican genres; and Tropical Airplay, which focuses on the genres of tropical music. In 2005, the Latin Rhythm Airplay chart was introduced in response to the growing influence of Latin hip hop and reggaeton.[10]

Due to the increasing popularity of downloads sales and streaming data, Billboard updated the methodology for the Hot Latin Songs chart on October 11, 2012 to include digital sales and streaming activity in addition to airplay, as well as making only predominantly Spanish-language songs eligible for inclusion and increasing airplay data to more than 1,200 radio stations across the United States.[11]

Component charts

There are several component charts that contribute to the overall calculation of Hot Latin Songs. The most significant ones are:

  • Latin Airplay: The chart measures the songs with most radio airplay audience impressions on Regional Mexican, Latin pop, tropical and Latin rhythm stations.[12] Non-primarily-Spanish-language songs are eligible for inclusion. It was established on November 12, 1994. "Bidi Bidi Bom Bom" by Selena was the first number-one song on the chart.[13] "La Tortura" by Shakira featuring Alejandro Sanz is the longest-reigning number-one, with 25 non-consecutive weeks from June 4, 2005 to December 3, 2005.[14]
  • Latin Digital Songs: The chart measures the best-selling Spanish-language digital songs.[15] It was established on January 23, 2010. "Loba" by Shakira was the first number-one song on the chart.[16] "Danza Kuduro" by Don Omar featuring Lucenzo is the longest-running number-one, with 94 non-consecutive weeks from May 14, 2011 to July 20, 2013.[17]
  • Latin Streaming Songs: The chart measures the most-streamed Spanish-language songs and videos on selected online music services.[18] It was established on April 20, 2013. "Hips Don't Lie" by Shakira featuring Wyclef Jean was the first number-one song on the chart.[19] "Bailando" by Enrique Iglesias featuring Descemer Bueno and Gente de Zona is the longest-leading number-one, with 66 non-consecutive weeks from May 17, 2015 to April 16, 2016.[20][21]

Compilation

The tracking week for sales and streaming begins on Friday and ends on Thursday, while the radio play tracking-week runs from Monday to Sunday. A new chart is compiled and officially released to the public by Billboard on Tuesday. Each chart is post-dated with the "week-ending" issue date four days after the charts are refreshed online (i.e., the following Saturday).[22] For example:

  • Friday, January 1 - sales tracking-week begins, streaming tracking-week begins
  • Monday, January 4 - airplay tracking-week begins
  • Thursday, January 7 - sales tracking-week ends, streaming tracking-week ends
  • Sunday, January 10 - airplay tracking-week ends
  • Tuesday, January 12 - new chart released, with issue post-dated Saturday, January 16

Hot Latin Songs policy changes

The methods and policies by which this data is obtained and compiled have changed many times throughout the chart's history.

Digital downloads and online streaming

Since October 11, 2012, the Billboard Hot Latin Songs tracks paid digital downloads and streaming activity.[11]Billboard initially started tracking downloads since January 10, 2010 with the Latin Digital Songs chart.[23] However, these downloads did not count towards Hot Latin Songs. A component Latin Streaming Songs chart was introduced on April 20, 2013, which ranks web radio streams from services such as Spotify, as well as on-demand audio titles.[24]

Recurrents

Billboard, in an effort to allow the chart to remain as current as possible and to give proper representation to new and developing artists and tracks, has removed titles that have reached certain criteria regarding its current rank and number of weeks on the chart. A song is permanently moved to "recurrent status" if it has spent 20 weeks on Hot Latin Songs and fallen below position number 25.[25] Additionally, descending songs are removed from the chart if ranking below number 10 after 26 weeks or below number five after 52 weeks.[26]

Achievements and milestones

Enrique Iglesias has the most number-one songs, with 27 between 1995 and 2016.
Luis Miguel has the most top 10 songs, with 39 between 1987 and 2005.
"Despacito" by Luis Fonsi (pictured), Daddy Yankee and Justin Bieber is the longest-running number one, with 56 non-consecutive weeks from February 2017 to September 2018.

Top 10 songs of All-Time (1986-2018)

In 2016, for the 30th anniversary of Hot Latin Songs, Billboard magazine compiled a ranking of the 50 best-performing songs on the chart over the 30 years, along with the best-performing artists.[27]Billboard has stated that "due to changes in chart methodology over the years, eras are weighted differently to account for chart turnover rates over various periods."[28] The top 20 was updated in 2018.[29]

Rank Single Artist(s) Year released Peak and duration Ref.
1. "Despacito" Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee featuring Justin Bieber 2017 #1 for 56 weeks[30] [28]
2. "Propuesta Indecente" Romeo Santos 2013 #1 for 4 weeks[30]
3. "A Puro Dolor" Son by Four 2000 #1 for 20 weeks[31]
4. "Mi Gente" J Balvin and Willy William featuring Beyoncé 2017 #1 for 12 weeks[32]
5. "Si Tú Supieras" Alejandro Fernández 1997 #1 for 6 weeks[33]
6. "Chantaje" Shakira featuring Maluma 2016 #1 for 11 weeks[34]
7. "La Tortura" Shakira featuring Alejandro Sanz 2005 #1 for 25 weeks[35]
8. "Te Quiero" Flex 2007 #1 for 20 weeks[36]
9. "No Me Doy por Vencido" Luis Fonsi 2008 #1 for 19 weeks[37]
10. "El Perdón" Nicky Jam and Enrique Iglesias 2015 #1 for 30 weeks[38]

Songs with most weeks at number one

  • 56 weeks - Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee featuring Justin Bieber - "Despacito"[a][40][41][42]
  • 41 weeks - Enrique Iglesias featuring Descemer Bueno and Gente de Zona - "Bailando"[43]
  • 30 weeks - Nicky Jam and Enrique Iglesias - "El Perdón"[38]
  • 25 weeks - Shakira featuring Alejandro Sanz - "La Tortura"[35]
  • 22 weeks - J Balvin - "Ginza"[44]

Songs with most total weeks

Artists with most number-one singles

Artists with most top 10 singles

Artists with most chart entries

See also

Notes

  1. ^ The original version of "Despacito" by Luis Fonsi featuring Daddy Yankee remained at number one for 12 weeks before the remix version featuring Justin Bieber was combined to the chart entry on May 6, 2017.[39]

References

  1. ^ a b "New Latin Section Created; Chart, Albums Reviews Added". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 98 (40): 3. October 4, 1986. Retrieved 2010.
  2. ^ "Billboard Methodology". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. Archived from the original on 2008-02-09. Retrieved .
  3. ^ "Top Latin Songs - La Guirnalda - Rocío Dúrcal". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. September 6, 1986. Retrieved 2009.
  4. ^ "Hot Latin 50 For The Week Ending October 4, 1986". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. October 4, 1986. Retrieved 2018.
  5. ^ "Enrique Iglesias, Shakira and More on our Hot Latin Songs Chart 30th Anniversary: Artists With the Most No. 1s". Billboard. October 4, 2016. Retrieved 2018.
  6. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Songs - The Week of September 06, 1986". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  7. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Songs - The Week of September 13, 1986". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  8. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Songs - The Week of September 20, 1986". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  9. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Songs - The Week of September 27, 1986". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  10. ^ "Daddy Yankee Remembers 'Gasolina' 10 Years Later: 'I Knew It Was a Home Run'". Billboard. Archived from the original on June 22, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  11. ^ a b "Billboard Shakes Up Genre Charts With New Methodology". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. October 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  12. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Airplay Songs Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  13. ^ "Latin Music: Top Latin Airplay Songs Chart - The Week of November 12, 1994". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  14. ^ Mendizabal, Amaya (April 6, 2017). "Enrique Iglesias Earns 29th No. 1 on Latin Airplay Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  15. ^ "Latin Digital Song Sales: Top Spanish Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  16. ^ "Latin Digital Song Sales: Top Spanish Songs - The Week of January 23, 2010". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  17. ^ Fernandez, Suzette (July 7, 2017). "Las 7 canciones con 20 o más semanas en el #1 de Latin Digital Song Sales de Billboard" [The 7 songs with 20 or more weeks at number one on Billboards Latin Digital Song Sales]. Billboard (in Spanish). Telemundo. Retrieved 2018.
  18. ^ "Latin Streaming Songs: Top Spanish Songs Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  19. ^ "Latin Streaming Songs: Top Spanish Songs Chart - The Week of April 20, 2013". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  20. ^ "Enrique Iglesias Bailando Chart History (Latin Streaming Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  21. ^ "Billboard Chart Search: Bailando (Latin Streaming Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  22. ^ "Billboard Chart & Magazine Dates Now to Align Closer to Release Week". Billboard. December 19, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  23. ^ "Latin Digital Song Sales: Top Spanish Songs - The Week of January 23, 2010". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  24. ^ "Latin Streaming Songs: Top Spanish Songs Chart - The Week of April 20, 2013". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  25. ^ "Billboard Charts Legend". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  26. ^ Mendizabal, Amaya (October 19, 2016). "30 Years of Hot Latin Songs: Enrique Iglesias Top Artist, Romeo Santos' 'Propuesta Indecente' Top Song". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  27. ^ a b Mendizabal, Amaya (October 19, 2016). "30 Years of Hot Latin Songs: Enrique Iglesias Top Artist, Romeo Santos' 'Propuesta Indecente' Top Song". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  28. ^ a b "Greatest of All Time Hot Latin Songs". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  29. ^ Bustios, Pamela (September 15, 2018). "The Top 20 Latin Songs of All Time on the Billboard Charts". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  30. ^ a b c "Romeo Santos Propuesta Indecente Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  31. ^ a b "Son by Four A Puro Dolor Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  32. ^ "J Balvin Mi Gente Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  33. ^ "Alejandro Fernández Si Tu Supieras Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  34. ^ "Shakira Chantaje Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  35. ^ a b "Shakira La Tortura Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  36. ^ "Flex Te Quiero Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  37. ^ "Luis Fonsi No Me Doy Por Vencido Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  38. ^ a b "Nicky Jam El Perdon Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  39. ^ "Justin Bieber sorprende a sus fanáticos cantando en español 'Despacito' junto a Luis Fonsi" (in Spanish). CNN en Español. April 17, 2017. Retrieved 2018.
  40. ^ a b "Luis Fonsi Despacito Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  41. ^ Bustios, Pamela (February 12, 2018). "Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee's 'Despacito' Breaks Hot Latin Songs Record for Most Weeks at No. 1". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  42. ^ Bustios, Pamela (April 10, 2018). "Luis Fonsi & Daddy Yankee's 'Despacito' Hits 50th Week at No. 1 on Hot Latin Songs Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  43. ^ "Enrique Iglesias Bailando Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  44. ^ "J Balvin Ginza Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  45. ^ "Prince Royce Incondicional Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  46. ^ "Aventura Mi Corazoncito Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  47. ^ a b "Enrique Iglesias Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  48. ^ Mendizabal, Amaya (October 4, 2016). "Enrique Iglesias, Shakira and More on our Hot Latin Songs Chart 30th Anniversary: Artists With the Most No. 1s". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  49. ^ a b c "Luis Miguel Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  50. ^ "Gloria Estefan Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  51. ^ a b "Ricky Martin Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  52. ^ a b "Shakira Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  53. ^ a b "Marco Antonio Solís Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  54. ^ "Maná Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  55. ^ "Wisin & Yandel Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  56. ^ Mendizabal, Amaya (August 12, 2015). "Ricky Martin Scores 26th Top 10 Hit on Hot Latin Songs Chart". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.
  57. ^ "Cristian Castro Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  58. ^ "Chayanne Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  59. ^ a b "Marc Anthony Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  60. ^ "Los Tigres del Norte Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  61. ^ "Hot Latin Songs - Week of May 9, 2009". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc: 73, 78. May 9, 2009. Retrieved 2018.
  62. ^ "Daddy Yankee Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  63. ^ "Vicente Fernandez Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2017.
  64. ^ "Ozuna Chart History (Hot Latin Songs)". Billboard. Retrieved 2018.

External links


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