Holiday Bowl
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Holiday Bowl

Coordinates: 32°46?59?N 117°7?10?W / 32.78306°N 117.11944°W / 32.78306; -117.11944

Holiday Bowl
San Diego County Credit Union Holiday Bowl
SDCCU Holiday Bowl logo.svg
StadiumAztec Stadium
LocationSan Diego, California
Previous stadiumsSDCCU Stadium (1978-2019)
Operated1978-present
Conference tie-insPac-12 (1997-present)
ACC (2020-present)
Previous conference tie-insWAC (1978-97)
Big 12 (1995-2013)
Big Ten (1991-94; 2014-2020)
PayoutUS$6,532,700 (2019)[1]
Sponsors
SeaWorld (1986-90)
Thrifty Car Rental (1991-94)
Plymouth (1995-97)
Culligan (1998-2001)
Pacific Life Insurance Company (2002-09)
Bridgepoint Education (2010-12)
National University (2013-14)
National Funding (2015-16)
San Diego County Credit Union (2017-present)
Former names
Holiday Bowl (1978-85)
Sea World Holiday Bowl (1986-90)
Thrifty Car Rental Holiday Bowl (1991-94)
Plymouth Holiday Bowl (1995-97)
Culligan Holiday Bowl (1998-2001)
Pacific Life Holiday Bowl (2002-09)
Bridgepoint Education Holiday Bowl (2010-12)
National University Holiday Bowl (2013-14)
National Funding Holiday Bowl (2015-16)
2019 matchup
Iowa vs. USC (Iowa 49-24)
2020 matchup
Cancelled due to COVID-19 concerns

The Holiday Bowl is a post-season NCAA Division I Football Bowl Subdivision college football bowl game that has been played annually since 1978. San Diego County Credit Union has been the game's title sponsor since 2017, and the bowl has been officially known as the San Diego County Credit Union Holiday Bowl.

On October 22, 2020, organizers cancelled the 2020 edition of the bowl, citing complications from the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.[2] Had the game been played, there was some talk of moving the game to either the University of San Diego, San Diego Mesa College, or to Southwestern College. There are still plans to play the game in 2021; however, since SDCCU Stadium (which had been the site of every edition of this game) is being demolished in favor of Aztec Stadium, the venue for that year's game is unclear. Petco Park, the city's only other large-scale outdoor venue, was built for baseball and would have to be reconfigured to accommodate a football field. Officials have ruled out Dignity Health Sports Park, which is the temporary home of the San Diego State football program for the 2020 and 2021 seasons. Aztec Stadium will host the Holiday Bowl effective with its opening in 2022.

History

The Holiday Bowl was founded to give the Western Athletic Conference an automatic bowl bid after the Fiesta Bowl, which previously had a tie in with the conference, ended its association with the WAC following the departure of Arizona and Arizona State (the latter of which served as the game's host) to join the Pacific-8 Conference in the summer of 1978. The Holiday Bowl inherited the Fiesta Bowl's former WAC ties and gave the conference's champion its automatic bid. For the first several editions, the WAC champion played an at-large team in the Holiday Bowl. From 1991 through 1994, the Big Ten Conference was given the second bid, provided it had enough bowl-eligible teams.

Beginning in 1995, the Big Eight Conference replaced the Big Ten and remained tied with the bowl through as the conference expanded to become the Big 12 the following year. The WAC's automatic bid was split, with first choice given to the Cotton Bowl Classic in Dallas, and a team from the Pacific-10 Conference was added as the alternate pick (meaning that, if the WAC champion played in the Cotton Bowl, a Pac-10 team would play in the Holiday Bowl). The WAC ended its association with the Holiday Bowl after 1997, and the game became a matchup between the Big 12 and Pac-10.

From 1998-2009, the matchup featured the #2 Pac-12 team playing the #3 Big 12 team, but the Alamo Bowl outbid the Holiday Bowl to feature that matchup beginning in 2010. Holiday Bowl Executive Director Bruce Binkowski stated that average ticket prices for the Holiday Bowl would have had to have been increased from $60 to $100 to match the Alamo Bowl's offer of a $3 million payout (the Holiday Bowl was only offering $2.35 million).[3] The now-Pac-12 and Big 12 retained their contracts with the Holiday Bowl, however, and the 2010-2013 matchups pitted the #3 Pac-12 team against the #5 Big 12 team.[4]

Starting with the 2014 game, the Big Ten signed a six-year contract to return after a 20-year absence to the Holiday Bowl, regaining the slot they held from 1991-1994. With this agreement, the Holiday Bowl featured the #3 Pac-12 team and the #4 Big Ten team. Starting in 2020, the Bowl will host a Pac-12 team and an ACC team, the first time an ACC team has played in San Diego in almost 30 years. [5]

Since 2017, the sponsor has been San Diego County Credit Union, which formerly sponsored San Diego's other bowl game, the now-defunct Poinsettia Bowl.[6] In 2015 and 2016, the title sponsor was National Funding, a San Diego-based alternative lender.[7] Previous sponsors have included SeaWorld, Thrifty Car Rental, Chrysler Corporation (through its Plymouth brand), Culligan, Pacific Life, Bridgepoint Education and National University.

Related events

The game is also celebrated with the Big Bay Balloon Parade, organized by the Port of San Diego and currently sponsored by San Diego County Credit Union.[]

Game results

For the first seven games, Brigham Young University represented the WAC as its champion. In the inaugural game on December 22, The Midshipmen of the United States Naval Academy came in with an 8-3 record and a Commander-in-Chief's Trophy and then capped the remarkable season with a 23-16 comeback victory over the highly favored Cougars. BYU has played in a total of 11 Holiday Bowls, more than any other team. The 1980 game was known as "The Miracle Bowl" as BYU erased a 20-point Southern Methodist lead in the last 2 minutes of the game, tying the score on the last play of the game - a 60-yard pass from All-American quarterback Jim McMahon to tight end Clay Brown as time expired. BYU kicker Kurt Gunther added the go ahead extra point.

The 1983 game between BYU and Missouri had its own miraculous ending, as BYU rallied behind All-American quarterback Steve Young. With just 23 seconds left, Young gave a handoff to Eddie Stinnett. Stinnett then turned around and passed it back to Steve Young, who caught it and ran in for a touchdown, giving BYU a 21-17 win. Young achieved a rare feat in college football: one touchdown pass, one touchdown run, and one touchdown reception all in a single game. For his efforts, he was named offensive MVP.

One year later, BYU, led by their legendary coach, LaVell Edwards, won the national championship in the Holiday Bowl by defeating the University of Michigan Wolverines, coached by Bo Schembechler, 24-17. Because of the WAC's contract with the Holiday Bowl, BYU, #1 ranked and the only undefeated team in Division I-A going into that season's bowls, was obligated to play in the mid-tier Holiday Bowl against a mediocre (6-5) Michigan squad. Again, the Holiday Bowl came down to the final few plays. BYU drove the length of the field and scored on a pass from injured All-American quarterback Robbie Bosco to Kelly Smith with 1:23 remaining. Marv Allen, who also played in the very first Holiday Bowl as a redshirt freshman in 1978, sealed the victory with an interception. It was the first — and only — time that the title was won at the Holiday Bowl.

Rankings are based on the AP Poll prior to the game being played.

Cal vs. Texas Tech at the 2004 Holiday Bowl
Date Played Winning team Losing team Attnd. Notes
December 22, 1978 Navy 23 BYU 16 52,500 notes
December 21, 1979 Indiana 38 #9 BYU 37 52,500 notes
December 19, 1980 #14 BYU 46 #19 SMU 45 50,200 notes
December 18, 1981 #14 BYU 38 #20 Washington State 36 52,419 notes
December 17, 1982 #17 Ohio State 47 BYU 17 52,533 notes
December 23, 1983 #9 BYU 21 Missouri 17 51,480 notes
December 21, 1984 #1 BYU 24 Michigan 17 61,243 notes
December 22, 1985 #14 Arkansas 18 Arizona State 17 60,641 notes
December 30, 1986 #19 Iowa 39 San Diego State 38 59,473 notes
December 30, 1987 #18 Iowa 20 Wyoming 19 61,892 notes
December 30, 1988 #12 Oklahoma State 62 #15 Wyoming 14 60,641 notes
December 29, 1989 #18 Penn State 50 #19 BYU 39 61,113 notes
December 29, 1990 Texas A&M 65 #13 BYU 14 61,441 notes
December 30, 1991 BYU 13 #7 Iowa 13 60,646 notes
December 30, 1992 Hawaii 27 Illinois 17 44,457 notes
December 30, 1993 #11 Ohio State 28 BYU 21 52,108 notes
December 30, 1994 #20 Michigan 24 #10 Colorado State 14 59,453 notes
December 29, 1995 #10 Kansas State 54 Colorado State 21 51,051 notes
December 30, 1996 #8 Colorado 33 #13 Washington 21 54,749 notes
December 29, 1997 #18 Colorado State 35 #19 Missouri 24 50,761 notes
December 30, 1998 #5 Arizona 23 #14 Nebraska 20 65,354 notes
December 29, 1999 #7 Kansas State 24 Washington 20 57,118 notes
December 29, 2000 #8 Oregon 35 #12 Texas 30 63,278 notes
December 28, 2001 #9 Texas 47 #21 Washington 43 60,548 notes
December 27, 2002 #6 Kansas State 34 Arizona State 27 58,717 notes
December 30, 2003 #15 Washington State 28 #5 Texas 20 61,102 notes
December 30, 2004 #23 Texas Tech 45 #4 California 31 63,711 notes
December 29, 2005 Oklahoma 17 #6 Oregon 14 65,416 notes
December 28, 2006 #20 California 45 #21 Texas A&M 10 62,395 notes
December 27, 2007 #17 Texas 52 #12 Arizona State 34 64,020 notes
December 30, 2008 #15 Oregon 42 #13 Oklahoma State 31 59,106 notes
December 30, 2009 #20 Nebraska 33 #22 Arizona 0 64,607 notes
December 30, 2010 Washington 19 #17 Nebraska 7 57,921 notes
December 28, 2011 Texas 21 California 10 56,313 notes
December 27, 2012 Baylor 49 #17 UCLA 26 55,507 notes
December 30, 2013 Texas Tech 37 #16 Arizona State 23 52,930 notes
December 27, 2014 #24 USC 45 #25 Nebraska 42 55,789 notes
December 30, 2015 #23 Wisconsin 23 USC 21 48,329 notes
December 27, 2016 Minnesota 17 Washington State 12 48,704 notes
December 28, 2017 #19 Michigan State 42 #21 Washington State 17 47,092 notes
December 31, 2018 Northwestern 31 #20 Utah 20 47,007 notes
December 27, 2019 #19 Iowa 49 #22 USC 24 50,123 notes
2020 Cancelled due to the COVID-19 pandemic[8]

MVPs

2005 offensive MVP Rhett Bomar
2005 defensive co-MVP C. J. Ah You

The bowl names offensive and defensive MVPs; in some instances, co-MVPs have been named, or two offensive MVPs in lieu of a defensive MVP.

Game Offensive MVP Defensive MVP
Player Team Pos. Player Team Pos.
1978 Phil McConkey Navy WR Tom Enlow BYU LB
1979 Marc Wilson BYU QB Tim Wilbur Indiana CB
1980 Jim McMahon
Craig James
BYU
SMU
QB
RB
 
1981 Jim McMahon BYU QB Kyle Whittingham BYU LB
1982 Tim Spencer Ohio State RB Garcia Lane Ohio State CB
1983 Steve Young BYU QB Bobby Bell Missouri DE
1984 Robbie Bosco BYU QB Leon White BYU LB
1985 Bobby Joe Edmonds Arkansas RB Greg Battle Arizona State LB
1986 Mark Vlasic
Todd Santos
Iowa
San Diego State
QB
QB
Richard Brown San Diego State LB
1987 Craig Burnett Wyoming QB Anthony Wright Iowa CB
1988 Barry Sanders Oklahoma State RB Sim Drain Oklahoma State LB
1989 Blair Thomas
Ty Detmer
Penn State
BYU
RB
QB
 
1990 Bucky Richardson Texas A&M QB William Thomas Texas A&M LB
1991 Ty Detmer BYU QB Josh Arnold
Carlos James
BYU
Iowa
DB
DB
1992 Michael Carter Hawaii QB Junior Tagoai Hawaii DT
1993 Raymont Harris
John Walsh
Ohio State
BYU
RB
QB
Lorenzo Styles Ohio State LB
1994 Todd Collins
Anthoney Hill
Michigan
Colorado State
QB
QB
Matt Dyson Michigan LB
1995 Brian Kavanagh Kansas State QB Mario Smith Kansas State DB
1996 Koy Detmer Colorado QB Nick Ziegler Colorado DE
1997 Moses Moreno
Darran Hall
Colorado State
Colorado State
QB
WR
 
1998 Keith Smith Arizona QB Mike Rucker Nebraska DE
1999 Jonathan Beasley Kansas State QB Darren Howard Kansas State DE
2000 Joey Harrington Oregon QB Rashad Bauman Oregon DB
2001 Major Applewhite
Willie Hurst
Texas
Washington
QB
RB
Derrick Johnson Texas LB
2002 Ell Roberson Kansas State QB Terrell Suggs Arizona State DE
2003 Sammy Moore Washington State WR Kyle Basler Washington State P
2004 Sonny Cumbie Texas Tech QB Vincent Meeks Texas Tech DB
2005 Rhett Bomar Oklahoma QB C. J. Ah You
Anthony Trucks
Oklahoma
Oregon
DE
DB
2006 Marshawn Lynch
Nate Longshore
California
California
RB
QB
Desmond Bishop California LB
2007 Colt McCoy Texas QB Brian Orakpo Texas DE
2008 Jeremiah Masoli Oregon QB Jairus Byrd Oregon DB
2009 Niles Paul Nebraska WR Matt O'Hanlon Nebraska DB
2010 Chris Polk Washington RB Mason Foster Washington LB
2011 David Ash Texas QB Keenan Robinson Texas LB
2012 Lache Seastrunk Baylor RB Chris McAllister Baylor DE
2013 Davis Webb Texas Tech QB Will Smith Texas Tech LB
2014 Cody Kessler USC QB Leonard Williams USC DE
2015 Joel Stave Wisconsin QB Jack Cichy Wisconsin LB
2016 Rodney Smith Minnesota RB Blake Cashman Minnesota LB
2017 Brian Lewerke Michigan State QB Chris Frey Michigan State LB
2018 Clayton Thorson Northwestern QB JR Pace Northwestern S
2019 Ihmir Smith-Marsette Iowa WR A. J. Epenesa Iowa DE

Source:[9]:96

Most appearances

Updated through the December 2019 edition (42 games, 84 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record Win pct.
1 BYU 11 4-6-1 .409
2 Texas 5 3-2 .600
T3 Iowa 4 3-0-1 .875
T3 Washington 4 1-3 .250
T3 Nebraska 4 1-3 .250
T3 Washington State 4 1-3 .250
T3 Arizona State 4 0-4 .000
T8 Kansas State 3 3-0 1.000
T8 Oregon 3 2-1 .667
T8 California 3 1-2 .333
T8 Colorado State 3 1-2 .333
T8 USC 3 1-2 .333
T13 Ohio State 2 2-0 1.000
T13 Texas Tech 2 2-0 1.000
T13 Arizona 2 1-1 .500
T13 Michigan 2 1-1 .500
T13 Oklahoma State 2 1-1 .500
T13 Texas A&M 2 1-1 .500
T13 Missouri 2 0-2 .000
T13 Wyoming 2 0-2 .000
Teams with a single appearance

Won (12): Arkansas, Baylor, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, Michigan State, Minnesota, Navy, Northwestern, Oklahoma, Penn State, Wisconsin
Lost (5): Illinois, San Diego State, SMU, UCLA, Utah

  • With Utah's appearance in the 2018 Holiday Bowl, every Pac-12 school except Stanford and Oregon State has appeared in the game (Colorado appeared while a member of the Big 12).
  • Iowa State, TCU, Kansas, and West Virginia are the only current or former Big 12 members that have not played in the bowl.

Appearances by conference

Updated through the December 2019 edition (42 games, 84 total appearances).

Conference Record Appearances by season
Games W L T Win pct. Won Lost Tied
Pac-12 25 7 18 0 .280 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010, 2014 1981, 1985, 1996, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019  
Big 12 18 11 7 0 .611 1996, 1999, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2012, 2013 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2008, 2010  
WAC 18 6 11 1 .361 1980, 1981, 1983, 1984, 1992, 1997 1978, 1979, 1982, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1993, 1994, 1995 1991
Big Ten 15 11 3 1 .767 1979, 1982, 1986, 1987, 1993, 1994, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 1984, 1992, 2014 1991
Big Eight 3 2 1 0 .667 1988, 1995 1983  
SWC 3 2 1 0 .667 1985, 1990 1980  
Independents 2 2 0 0 1.000 1978, 1989    
  • Pac-12 record includes appearances when the conference was known as the Pac-10 (before 2011).
  • Conferences that are defunct or no longer active in FBS are marked in italics.
  • Independent appearances: Navy (1978), Penn State (1989)

Game records

Team Record, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most points scored (one team) 65, Texas A&M vs. BYU 1990
Most points scored (losing team) 45, SMU vs. BYU 1980
Most points scored (both teams) 91, BYU vs. SMU 1980
Fewest points allowed 0, Nebraska vs. Arizona 2009
Largest margin of victory 51, Texas A&M vs. BYU 1990
Total yards 698, Oklahoma State vs. Wyoming 1988
Rushing yards 393, SMU vs. BYU 1980
Passing yards 576, BYU vs. Penn State 1989
First downs 35, BYU vs. Penn State 1989
Fewest yards allowed 109, Nebraska vs. Arizona 2009
Fewest rushing yards allowed -12, Texas A&M vs. BYU 1990
Fewest passing yards allowed 46, Nebraska vs. Arizona 2009
Individual Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
All-purpose yards
Touchdowns (all-purpose) 5, Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State vs. Wyoming 1988
Rushing yards 235, Raymont Harris, Ohio State vs. BYU 1993
Rushing touchdowns 5, Barry Sanders, Oklahoma State vs. Wyoming 1988
Passing yards 576, Ty Detmer, BYU vs. Penn State 1989
Passing touchdowns 4, by several players--most recent:
Davis Webb, Texas Tech vs. Arizona State

2013
Receiving yards 168, Dez Bryant, Oklahoma State vs. Oregon 2008
Receiving touchdowns 3, Clay Brown, BYU vs. SMU 1980
Tackles 18 (total), Garland Rivers, Michigan vs. BYU
17 (solo), same
1984
Sacks 4, Bobby Bell, Missouri vs. BYU 1983
Interceptions 2, by several players--most recent:
Brandon Foster, Texas vs. Arizona State

2007
Long Plays Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
Touchdown run 76, Jeremiah Johnson, Oregon vs. Oklahoma State 2008
Touchdown pass 76, Koy Detmer to Rae Carruth, Colorado vs. Washington 1996
Kickoff return 98, shared by:
Adoree' Jackson, USC vs. Nebraska
Ihmir Smith-Marsette, Iowa vs. USC

2014
2019
Punt return 85, Darran Hall, Colorado State vs. Missouri 1997
Interception return 48, Vincent Meeks, Texas Tech vs. California 2004
Fumble return 82, Jared McGee, Northwestern vs. Utah[10] 2018
Punt 64, shared by:
Justin Tucker, Texas vs. California
Sam Foltz, Nebraska vs. USC

2011
2014
Field goal 51, Ray Tarasi, Penn State vs. BYU 1989

Source:[9]:97-107

Media coverage

The bowl has been broadcast by Mizlou (1978-1984), Lorimar (1985), ESPN (1986-2016), and Fox Sports 1 (2017-present).[11][12]

References

  1. ^ "2019 Bowl Schedule". collegefootballpoll.com. Retrieved 2019.
  2. ^ "2020 Holiday Bowl, Parade Cancelled". nbcsandiego.com. October 22, 2020. Retrieved 2020.
  3. ^ "Holiday Bowl drops down in the pecking order".
  4. ^ Tim Griffin (August 28, 2008). "Valero Alamo Bowl, Pacific-10 Conference agree on deal starting in 2010 season". Retrieved .
  5. ^ https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sports/college/story/2019-08-15/holiday-bowl-gets-acc-to-come-out-to-the-west-coast
  6. ^ De Crecenzo, Sarah (March 9, 2017). "S.D. County Credit Union to Sponsor Holiday Bowl". San Diego Business Journal. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ De Crecenzo, Sarah (October 27, 2016). "National Funding Will Be Title Sponsor of Holiday Bowl". San Diego Business Journal. Retrieved 2016.
  8. ^ Pickman, Ben (October 22, 2020). "2020 Holiday Bowl Canceled Amid COVID-19 Pandemic". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved 2020.
  9. ^ a b "Holiday Bowl Media Guide" (PDF). 2019. Retrieved 2019. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  10. ^ "Champs Again: Northwestern Wins 2018 Holiday Bowl". nusports.com. December 31, 2018. Retrieved 2020. McGee picked up the loose ball and returned it 82 yards for a touchdown to make it 20-17. It was the longest fumble recovery in Holiday Bowl history
  11. ^ Kelly, Doug (ed.). "2019-20 Football Bowl Association Media Guide" (PDF). footballbowlassociation.com: 89-90. Retrieved 2020.
  12. ^ Posner, Jay (June 15, 2017). "Holiday Bowl moving from ESPN to FS1". San Diego Union-Tribune. Retrieved 2017.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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