HD 33636
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HD 33636
HD 33636 A / B
Observation data
Epoch J2000.0      Equinox J2000.0
Constellation Orion
 05h 11m 46.448s[1]
Declination +04° 24′ 12.73″[1]
Characteristics
Spectral type G0VH-03 / M6V
B-V color index 0.588 ± 0.016 / ?[2]
Astrometry
Proper motion (?) RA: 169.0 ± 0.3[3] mas/yr
Dec.: -142.3 ± 0.3[3] mas/yr
Parallax (?)35.6 ± 0.2[3] mas
Distance91.6 ± 0.5 ly
(28.1 ± 0.2 pc)
Absolute magnitude (MV)4.77 / ?
Orbit
CompanionHD 33636 B
Period (P)5.797 ± 0.002[3]yr
14.2 ± 0.2 AU
Inclination (i)4.1 ± 0.1°
Details
Mass1.01 ± 0.02[4]/ ? M
Radius0.97 ± 0.01[4]/ ? R
Luminosity1.08 ± 0.003[4]/ ? L
Surface gravity (log g)4.46 ± 0.02[4]/ ? cgs
Temperature5979 ± 28[4]/ ? K
Age2.5 ± 1.1[4] Gyr
Other designations
BD+04 858, HIP 24205, SAO 74702
Database references
SIMBADdata

HD 33636 is a binary system located approximately 94 light-years away in Orion constellation. The visible member HD 33636 A is a 7th magnitude yellow main-sequence star. It is located at a distance of 91.6 light years from Earth. It has a metallicity of -0.05 ± 0.07.

A companion was discovered in 2002 with a minimum mass of planet size.[2][5] This was ascertained to be a low-mass star in 2007, making it HD 33636 B.[3]

HD 33636 B

HD 33636 B was discovered in 2002 by the Keck telescope in Hawaii.[5] It was independently detected at the Haute-Provence Observatory in switzerland.[2] With this method it showed a minimum mass of 9.28 Jupiter masses, and was initially assumed to be a planet and provisionally labelled "HD 33636 b" (lower-case).

In 2007, Bean et al. used the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and he found that this body has an inclination as little as 4.1 ± 0.1°, which yielded the true mass of 142 Jupiter masses. This is too high to be a planet. It is now classified as an M-dwarf star of spectral type M6V, "HD 33636 B" (upper-case).

This star takes 2117 days or 5.797 years to orbit at the average distance of 3.27 Astronomical Units (AU).

References

  1. ^ a b van Leeuwen, F. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653-664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.Vizier catalog entry
  2. ^ a b c Perrier, C.; et al. (2003). "The ELODIE survey for northern extra-solar planets. I. Six new extra-solar planet candidates". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 410 (3): 1039-1049. arXiv:astro-ph/0308281. Bibcode:2003A&A...410.1039P. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20031340.
  3. ^ a b c d e Bean, Jacob L.; et al. (2007). "The Mass of the Candidate Exoplanet Companion to HD 33636 from Hubble Space Telescope Astrometry and High-Precision Radial Velocities". The Astronomical Journal. 134 (2): 749-758. arXiv:0705.1861. Bibcode:2007AJ....134..749B. doi:10.1086/519956.
  4. ^ a b c d e f Bonfanti, A.; et al. (2015). "Revising the ages of planet-hosting stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 575. A18. arXiv:1411.4302. Bibcode:2015A&A...575A..18B. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201424951.
  5. ^ a b Vogt, Steven S.; et al. (2002). "Ten Low-Mass Companions from the Keck Precision Velocity Survey". The Astrophysical Journal. 568 (1): 352-362. arXiv:astro-ph/0110378. Bibcode:2002ApJ...568..352V. doi:10.1086/338768.

External links


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