Gonzaga Bulldogs Baseball
Get Gonzaga Bulldogs Baseball essential facts below. View Videos or join the Gonzaga Bulldogs Baseball discussion. Add Gonzaga Bulldogs Baseball to your PopFlock.com topic list for future reference or share this resource on social media.
Gonzaga Bulldogs Baseball

Gonzaga Bulldogs
Gonzaga Bulldogs wordmark.svg
Founded1890
UniversityGonzaga University
Head coachMark Machtolf (17th season)
ConferenceWest Coast
LocationSpokane, Washington
Home stadiumWashington Trust Field and Patterson Baseball Complex
(Capacity: 1,300)
NicknameBulldogs
ColorsNavy Blue, White, and Red[1]
              
NCAA Tournament appearances
1971, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978,
1980, 1981, 2009, 2016, 2018
Conference tournament champions
Big Sky: 1971, 1973, 1974
WCC: 2009, 2018
Conference champions
Big Sky: 1965, 1971, 1973, 1974
Nor-Pac: 1976, 1978, 1980, 1981
WCC: 2009, 2013, 2016, 2018

The Gonzaga Bulldogs baseball team is the varsity intercollegiate baseball program of Gonzaga University, located in Spokane, Washington, United States. The NCAA Division I program has been a member of the West Coast Conference since 1996 and its home venue is Washington Trust Field and Patterson Baseball Complex, opened on Gonzaga's campus thirteen years ago in 2007.

Mark Machtolf has been the program's head coach since 2004. Through 2013, Gonzaga has appeared in eight NCAA Tournaments. It has won four conference championship series, seven regular season conference championships, and five regular season division titles. Gonzaga was formerly an affiliate member of the Pac-10 conference for baseball and previously played in the NorPac and Big Sky conferences.

As of the start of the 2013 season, 16 former Bulldogs have played in Major League Baseball.

History

Gonzaga College was founded in September 1887, and the first recorded game of the baseball program was held shortly thereafter, in 1890.[2][3] On September 14, 1910, Dave Skeels became the first Gonzaga player to appear in the major leagues when he pitched in a game for the Detroit Tigers.[4][5] In 1912, the college was recognized by the state of Washington as a university and was renamed Gonzaga University.[2] Although the team competed in the first half of the 20th century,[6][7] comprehensive records of its play do not exist prior to the 1960 season, when the team competed as an independent school in District VII of the NCAA's University Division.[8]

Big Sky

Gonzaga was a charter member of the Big Sky Conference, which launched in the summer of 1963 with six schools. Its first baseball season was in 1964,[9] and the Bulldogs won the conference title in 1965.[10] Prior to the 1967 season, the program opened Pecarovich Field, named for former Gonzaga football head coach Mike Pecarovich.[11][12]

Larry Koentopp was named head coach prior to the 1970 season, and the Big Sky expanded to eight teams that summer. For baseball, the conference split into two-four team divisions for the 1971 season,[13][14] and Gonzaga won all won four Northern division titles from 1971 through 1974. The Zags won the Big Sky championship series in three of those four seasons,[10] which earned a berth in the NCAA tournament in 1971,[15][16]1973,[17][18] and 1974.[9][19][20][21][22][23] The 1972 team entered the Big Sky tournament on a winning streak,[24] but was the first team eliminated.[25] It was the only year the Big Sky used a four-team format; the other three seasons had a best-of-three series between the division winners.

Northern Pacific

Following the 1974 season, the Big Sky discontinued sponsorship of five of its ten sports, including baseball.[26][27] Along with Idaho and Boise State, the program joined the new seven-team Northern Pacific Conference (NorPac) in June 1974.[28][29][30] The Bulldogs were second in 1975,[31] but won four conference championships in the next six seasons to advance to the NCAA tournament in 1976,[32]1978,[33]1980,[34] and 1981.[9][35][36] After Idaho and Boise State dropped baseball following the 1980 season,[37][38] the NorPac played a final season with five teams in 1981.[39]

Pacific-10

The four remaining NorPac programs (Gonzaga, Eastern Washington, Portland State, and Portland) moved to the Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) for the 1982 season,[40] into the Northern Division with Washington, Washington State, and Oregon State.[41][42] (Oregon dropped baseball after the 1981 season;[43][44] it returned in 2009.)

Gonzaga remained an affiliate member of the Pac-10 for baseball through the 1995 season, but never finished higher than runner-up in the North. The Bulldogs appeared in the division tournament six times (1986-1991) and hosted it from 1986-1989.[9][45]

West Coast Conference

Following the 1995 season, the program moved to the West Coast Conference (WCC), which the majority of the school's athletic programs had joined in the summer of 1979.[9][46] Also following the 1995 season, Pecarovich Field was renamed August/A.R.T. Stadium.[47][48]

Gonzaga initially struggled in WCC baseball, finishing 5th, 8th, and 6th in its first three seasons. However, after the WCC split into two four-team divisions prior to the 1999 season, Gonzaga finished 2nd in its division in 1999 and 2000 and won the Coast Division in 2001. In the best-of-three 2001 WCC Championship Series, Gonzaga lost to Pepperdine 2-1.[9]

During the 2003 season, August/A.R.T. Stadium was razed to allow for the construction of the McCarthey Athletic Center. The team used Spokane's Avista Stadium until its current venue, Washington Trust Field and Patterson Baseball Complex, was completed prior to the 2007 season.[49][50][51]

Following the 2003 season, Steve Hertz retired after 24 seasons as the program's head coach,[9][52] and was replaced by Mark Machtolf.[53] Under Machtolf, the team qualified for three WCC Championship Series (2007, 2009, 2011). After losing to San Diego in 2007, Gonzaga defeated Loyola Marymount in 2009 to qualify for the program's first NCAA Tournament since 1981. In the Fullerton Regional, the team defeated Georgia Southern in its first game, but it lost consecutive games to Cal State Fullerton and Utah and was eliminated. In the 2011 WCC Championship Series, Gonzaga lost to San Francisco.[9]

Conference affiliations

Venues

Early venues

The earliest known venue of the program is Underhill Park, located off-campus across the Spokane River.[54] Underhill still functions as a municipal park in Spokane.[55] The team moved from Underhill to its first on-campus home, located in Gonzaga's upper campus, where it played until after the 1966 season.[54]

August/A.R.T. Stadium

From 1967 into the 2003 season, the program played at August/A.R.T. Stadium, which had a capacity of The ballpark opened in 1967 as Pecarovich Field,[57] named for former Gonzaga football player and coach Mike Pecarovich (1898-1965).[11][58] Gonzaga swept a doubleheader against Central Washington on April 7 to open the field.[57][59]

Prior to the 1996 season, the venue was renamed August/A.R.T. Stadium,[47][48] and Gonzaga used it into the 2003 season; it was demolished and the McCarthey Athletic Center was built on the site.[54] In the stadium's last game on April 13, Gonzaga lost to San Francisco 8-3.[49][60] The remainder of the home schedule in 2003 was played at Spokane Falls Community College.[61]

Avista Stadium

For three seasons (2004-2006), Gonzaga played at Avista Stadium, the home venue of the minor league Spokane Indians.[50] Opened in 1958 as a Triple-A ballpark, it has a capacity of 7,162 spectators.[62]

Washington Trust Field and Patterson Baseball Complex

At the start of the 2007 season, the program opened its current venue, Washington Trust Field and Patterson Baseball Complex. In the home opener on March 15, Gonzaga defeated Rider 9-4.[51][63] It was dedicated a month later on April 20, named for Washington Trust Bank, a donor to the field's construction, and Michael Patterson, a Gonzaga alumnus.[50] It has a capacity of 1,500 spectators.[64]

Head coaches

Steve Hertz is the winningest and longest-tenured head coach in Gonzaga athletics history; in 24 seasons (1978, 1981-2003) at the helm, he recorded 637 wins.[9][65]

Year(s) Coach Seasons W-L-T Pct
1960-1961 Joe Schauble 2 6-26 .186
1962-1967 Dick Busch [66][67] 6 72-85-1 .459
1968-1969 Joey August 2 28-38 .424
1970-1977 Larry Koentopp 8 289-138 .677
1978, 1981-2003 Steve Hertz 24 637-630-6 .504
1979-1980 Jim Lawler 2 64-32 .667
2004-present Mark Machtolf 10 288-241-1 .544
Totals 7 54[8] 1394-1189-8 .540

Current coaching staff

  • Head coach - Mark Machtolf
  • Assistant coach - Danny Evans
  • Pitching coach - Brandon Harmon
  • Volunteer Assistant coach - Sean Winston[68]

Yearly records

Below is a table of the program's yearly records.[9][22][23][45][69][70][71][72][73][74][75]

Season Coach Overall Conference Standing Postseason
District VII Independent (1960-1963)
1960[8] Joe Schauble 3-13
1961 Joe Schauble 3-13
1962 Dick Busch 10-12
1963 Dick Busch 10-11
District VII Independent: 26-49
Big Sky Conference (1964-1974)
1964 Dick Busch 7-18-1 1-5 t-2nd (Northern)
1965 Dick Busch 19-10 9-3 1st
1966 Dick Busch 13-16 8-4 t-3rd
1967 Dick Busch 13-18 5-7 t-4th
1968 Joey August 16-19 6-6 t-3rd
1969 Joey August 12-19 4-8 t-5th
1970 Larry Koentopp 30-15 7-5 2nd
1971 Larry Koentopp 37-16 9-1 1st (Northern) District VII Regional
1972 Larry Koentopp 34-10 10-1 1st (Northern) Big Sky tournament[24][25]
1973 Larry Koentopp 34-17 10-2 1st (Northern) District VII Regional
1974 Larry Koentopp 45-14 9-2 1st (Northern) District VII Regional
Big Sky Conference: 260-172-1 78-44
Northern Pacific Conference (1975-1981)
1975 Larry Koentopp 32-18 16-8 2nd
1976 Larry Koentopp 43-23 19-5 1st Rocky Mountain Regional
1977 Larry Koentopp 34-25 14-10 3rd
1978 Steve Hertz 33-14 18-6 1st Rocky Mountain Regional
1979 Jim Lawler 25-17 13-11 4th
1980 Jim Lawler 39-15 23-4 1st West Regional
1981 Steve Hertz 48-21 25-7 1st West Regional
Northern Pacific Conference: 254-133 128-51
Pacific-10 Conference (1982-1995)
1982 Steve Hertz 30-28 10-14 5th (Northern)
1983 Steve Hertz 17-34 6-18 7th (Northern)
1984 Steve Hertz 23-29-1 6-14 6th (Northern)
1985 Steve Hertz 26-23-1 11-13 5th (Northern)
1986 Steve Hertz 30-21 13-10 2nd (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1987 Steve Hertz 20-32 8-16 6th (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1988 Steve Hertz 28-28 12-11 4th (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1989 Steve Hertz 27-19 15-9 t-2nd (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1990 Steve Hertz 37-21 13-11 4th (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1991 Steve Hertz 23-25 8-12 t-4th (Northern) Pac-10 North Tournament
1992 Steve Hertz 22-30 14-16 5th (Northern)
1993 Steve Hertz 17-36 9-21 5th (Northern)
1994 Steve Hertz 29-23 14-16 5th (Northern)
1995 Steve Hertz 29-25 15-15 3rd (Northern)
Pacific-10 Conference: 358-374-2 154-196
West Coast Conference (1996-present)
1996 Steve Hertz 24-25 12-15 5th
1997 Steve Hertz 19-33-1 7-21 8th
1998 Steve Hertz 16-34 10-20 6th
1999 Steve Hertz 27-23-2 14-14 2nd (West)
2000 Steve Hertz 28-25 17-13 2nd (Coast)
2001 Steve Hertz 28-27 17-13 1st (Coast) WCC Championship Series
2002 Steve Hertz 27-29 14-16 4th (Coast)
2003 Steve Hertz 26-25-1 14-16 3rd (Coast)
2004 Mark Machtolf 24-27 16-11 3rd (Coast)
2005 Mark Machtolf 28-26 15-15 3rd (Coast)
2006 Mark Machtolf 29-24 9-12 5th
2007 Mark Machtolf 33-25 15-6 2nd WCC Championship Series
2008 Mark Machtolf 30-23 10-10 5th
2009 Mark Machtolf 36-18 14-7 1st Fullerton Regional
2010 Mark Machtolf 20-36 8-13 t-5th
2011 Mark Machtolf 32-19-1 15-6 2nd WCC Championship Series
2012 Mark Machtolf 34-22 14-10 t-3rd
2013 Mark Machtolf 32-21 18-6 1st WCC Tournament
West Coast Conference: 493-462-5 238-224
Total: 1394-1189-8

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Notable former players

Below is a list of notable former Bulldogs and the seasons in which they played for the program.[4][65]

Retired numbers

The first retired number for the program was number 19 in 1982, worn by walk-on third baseman Mac Gebbers (1978-1982).[42][76][77]

2012 MLB Draft

Two Bulldogs were selected in the 2012 Major League Baseball Draft: OF Royce Bolinger by the Texas Rangers (6th round) and P Tyler Olson by the Oakland Athletics (17th round).[78] Bolinger signed a professional contract with the Rangers, while Olson chose not to sign with Oakland.[79][80]

2018 MLB Draft

Two Bulldogs were selected in the 2018 Major League Baseball Draft: P Daniel Bies by the New York Yankees (7th round) and P Casey Legumina by the Cleveland Indians (35th round). Bies signed with the Yankees, Legumina is currently unsigned. [81]

See also

References

  1. ^ Approved Primary & Secondary Athletic Logo Colors (PDF). Gonzaga University Visual Identity and Graphics Standards Guide. Retrieved 2018.
  2. ^ a b Kingma, David A. (October 6, 1995). "History of Gonzaga University". Gonzaga.edu. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012. Gonzaga College began its first academic year September 17, 1887 with a Mass of the Holy Spirit, a tradition that continues today.
  3. ^ a b "History". Gonzaga Baseball. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  4. ^ a b "Gonzaga University Baseball Players Who Made It to the Major Leagues". Baseball-Almanac.com. Archived from the original on July 12, 2004. Retrieved 2012.
  5. ^ "Dave Skeels". Retrosheet.org. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  6. ^ "Gonzaga baseball". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. January 24, 1908. p. 11.
  7. ^ "Team is chosen". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. March 20, 1908. p. 17.
  8. ^ a b c d Although records exist of games played as early as 1890, comprehensive records exist only for the 1960 season onward.[3][9]
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k "2012 Baseball Record Book" (PDF). GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 7, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  10. ^ a b "Past Baseball Champions". Big Sky Conference. Retrieved 2013.
  11. ^ a b "Memorial to Honor Mike Pecarovich: Gonzaga Plans Baseball Field". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. July 22, 1965. p. 11. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  12. ^ "Memorial to honor Mike Pecarovich". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. July 23, 1965. p. 11.
  13. ^ "Big Sky baseball: split loop planned". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 19, 1970. p. 13.
  14. ^ "Vandals list baseball play". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. January 28, 1971. p. 22.
  15. ^ "Zags beat Lumberjacks for Big Sky title". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. May 17, 1971. p. 10.
  16. ^ "Champ Zags rest". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 17, 1971. p. 14.
  17. ^ Jordan, Jeff (May 21, 1973). "Zags finish it off - hammer Jacks 13-1". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 10.
  18. ^ "Denver next foe for Bulldog nine". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 21, 1973. p. 15.
  19. ^ "Gonzaga-ISU 'snowed out'". Spokesman-Review. May 21, 1974. p. 14.
  20. ^ "Gonzaga in sweep for Big Sky title". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. May 22, 1974. p. 14.
  21. ^ "N. Colorado club next for Gonzaga". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 22, 1974. p. 17.
  22. ^ a b "Past Baseball Champions". BigSkyConf.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  23. ^ a b "Big Sky Baseball: Split Loop Planned". The Spokane Daily Chronicle. Spokane, Washington, USA. May 19, 1970. p. 35. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved 2012. The division winners will meet at the end of the season in a best-of-three series for the conference crown. The loop champion will represent the league in the NCAA District VII playoffs.
  24. ^ a b "Zags meet Idaho State in opener". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. May 19, 1972. p. 26.
  25. ^ a b "Zag year ends". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 20, 1972. p. 13.
  26. ^ "Idaho off probation, loop titles dwindle". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. May 5, 1974. p. 13.
  27. ^ "Baseball axed in Big Sky". Lewiston Morning Tribune. Idaho. May 29, 1974. p. 15.
  28. ^ "Idaho, Gonzaga join new baseball circuit". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Associated Press. June 24, 1974. p. 16.
  29. ^ "Portland State, Portland to play in baseball league". The Bulletin. Bend, Oregon. Associated Press. June 24, 1974. p. 12.
  30. ^ Jordan, Jeff (January 19, 1975). "Idea's time has arrived". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 3, sports.
  31. ^ "WSU, UPS picked for NCAA action". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 19, 1975. p. 17.
  32. ^ "Idaho leaves cellar; Cougs triumph, too". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 12, 1976. p. 37.
  33. ^ "Warriors in regionals, Zags gain title". Spokane Daily Chronicle. May 18, 1978. p. 53.
  34. ^ "Zags, Cougs, Bucs first". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 12, 1980. p. 21.
  35. ^ "Gonzaga wins title with 5-4 victory". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 16, 1981. p. 11.
  36. ^ "Zags bucking big odds tonight". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. May 22, 1981. p. 21.
  37. ^ "Boise State drops baseball program". Lewiston Morning Tribune. (Idaho). Associated Press. May 6, 1980. p. C1.
  38. ^ Goodwin, Dale (May 13, 1980). "Baseball's 'out' at Idaho". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). p. 19.
  39. ^ "Baseball: Northern Pacific". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Washington. (standings). May 16, 1981. p. 13.
  40. ^ "Pac-10 merger confirmed". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). August 14, 1981. p. 24.
  41. ^ Gerheim, Earl (February 26, 1982). "Zags seeking experience". Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. 27.
  42. ^ a b Gerheim, Earl (May 17, 1982). "Brayton 'sees' Pac-10 finish". Spokane Chronicle. p. 16.
  43. ^ Rodman, Bob (May 7, 1981). "A gloomy day for Ducks' oldest program". Eugene-Register Guard. Oregon. p. 1C.
  44. ^ "UO axes baseball, gymnastics". Eugene-Register Guard. Oregon. May 7, 1981. p. 1C.
  45. ^ a b "2012 Pac-12 Conference Media Guide". Pac-12 Conference. p. 65. Archived from the original on August 9, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  46. ^ "Bulldog Men Sweep WCC Honors: Few, Turiaf, Knight, Batista Take Home Major Honors". CSTV.com. February 28, 2005. Archived from the original on August 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012. It's the eighth time a Bulldog has been honored as the top coach since Gonzaga joined the conference for the 1979-80 season.
  47. ^ a b "Blood Strikes Out 18 in Gonzaga Victory". Spokesman.com. The Spokesman-Review. April 2, 1995. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  48. ^ a b "Workman Powers Gonzaga to Win". The Spokesman-Review. April 29, 1996. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012.
  49. ^ a b "Baseball Drops Final Game at August/A.R.T. Stadium". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. April 13, 2003. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  50. ^ a b c "Patterson Baseball Complex Dedication on Friday". Gonzaga.edu. April 18, 2007. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  51. ^ a b "Bulldogs Open New Baseball Complex". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. March 14, 2007. Archived from the original on August 7, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  52. ^ Vlahovich, Mike (February 10, 2005). "Hertz, Matlock, Tschirgi Recognized at Inland Northwest Luncheon". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. p. C6. Archived from the original on December 30, 2016. Retrieved 2012. Steve Hertz, who retired as Gonzaga University baseball coach following the 2003 season, ...
  53. ^ "2004 Gonzaga Baseball Quick Facts" (PDF). Gonzaga Sports Information. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 11, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  54. ^ a b c Blanchette, John (March 25, 2003). "GU Field Rife with Memories". The Spokesman-Review. Spokane, Washington. pp. C1, C6. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  55. ^ "Underhill Park". SpokaneHistorical.org. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  56. ^ "Gonzaga University Baseball Weekly Notes" (PDF). Gonzaga Sports Information. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  57. ^ a b "Zags, Sparts host diamond doubles". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). April 7, 1967. p. 18.
  58. ^ "Rivals Clash at Pecarovich". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). April 15, 1975. Archived from the original on January 24, 2013. Retrieved 2012.
  59. ^ "Gonzaga sweeps pair from 'Cats". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). April 8, 1967. p. 13.
  60. ^ "GU's finale at August/A.R.T. ends in defeat". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). April 14, 2003. p. C5.
  61. ^ "Baseball Starts Long Home Stint". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. April 22, 2003. Archived from the original on August 1, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  62. ^ Baseball America 2011 Directory. Simon & Schuster. March 22, 2011. ISBN 978-1-93239-139-8. Archived from the original on December 30, 2016. Retrieved 2012.
  63. ^ "Zags Open New Ballpark with Win". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. March 15, 2007. Archived from the original on August 7, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  64. ^ "Bulldogs Quick Facts" (PDF). GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. Archived from the original (PDF) on August 7, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  65. ^ a b "Miami Marlins Manager Mike Redmon Reminisces His Gonzaga Days". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. March 31, 2013. Archived from the original on March 31, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  66. ^ "Busch back with Zags". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). February 4, 1962. p. 4, sports.
  67. ^ "Former baseball coach Dick Busch dies". Gonzaga University Athletics. January 19, 2007. Retrieved 2019.
  68. ^ "Baseball - 2012 Coaches". GoZags.com. Gonzaga Sports Information. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  69. ^ "College Baseball Conference Standings - 1964". BoydsWorld.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  70. ^ "College Baseball Conference Standings - 1971". BoydsWorld.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  71. ^ "College Baseball Conference Standings - 1972". BoydsWorld.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  72. ^ "College Baseball Conference Standings - 1973". BoydsWorld.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  73. ^ "College Baseball Conference Standings - 1974". BoydsWorld.com. Archived from the original on August 8, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  74. ^ "2012 WCC Baseball Standings". D1Baseball.com. Archived from the original on August 14, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  75. ^ "2013 West Coast Conference Baseball Standings". D1Baseball.com. Jeremy Mills. Archived from the original on May 21, 2013. Retrieved 2013.
  76. ^ "GU retires Gebbers' 19". Spokane Chronicle. May 14, 1982. p. 15.
  77. ^ "Baseball team 1982: Mac Gebbers". Gonzaga University. Digital Collections. Retrieved 2014.
  78. ^ "2012 MLB Draft by School: G-M". CollegeBaseballInsider.com. June 14, 2012. Archived from the original on August 16, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  79. ^ Stalwick, Howie (June 12, 2012). "Top Baseball Picks from State Sign Deals". KitsapSun.com. Archived from the original on August 16, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  80. ^ "Oakland Athletics 2012 Draft Selections". Archived from the original on August 16, 2012. Retrieved 2012.
  81. ^ "MLB Draft History". Major League Baseball. Retrieved 2019.

External links


  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

Gonzaga_Bulldogs_baseball
 



 



 
Music Scenes