Football At the 1996 Summer Olympics - Women's Tournament
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Football At the 1996 Summer Olympics %E2%80%93 Women's Tournament

Football at the 1996 Summer Olympics - Women's tournament
Tournament details
Host countryUnited States
DatesJuly 21 - August 1
Teams8 (from 4 confederations)
Venue(s)5 (in 5 host cities)
Final positions
Champions United States[1]
Runners-up China PR
Third place Norway
Fourth place Brazil
Tournament statistics
Matches played16
Goals scored53 (3.31 per match)
Attendance691,762 (43,235 per match)
Top scorer(s)Norway Ann Kristin Aarønes
Norway Linda Medalen
Brazil Pretinha (4 goals)
2000

The 1996 Summer Olympics--based in Atlanta, Georgia, United States--marked the first time that women participated in the Olympic association football tournament.[2][3] The tournament featured eight women's national teams from four continental confederations. The teams were drawn into two groups of four and each group played a round-robin tournament (which was held in Miami, Orlando, Birmingham and Washington, D.C.). At the end of the group stage, the top two teams advanced to the knockout stage (which was held at Sanford Stadium in Athens, Georgia), beginning with the semi-finals and culminating with the gold medal match on August 1, 1996.

Competition schedule

G Group stage ½ Semifinals B 3rd place play-off F Final
Sun 21 Mon 22 Tue 23 Wed 24 Thu 25 Fri 26 Sat 27 Sun 28 Mon 29 Tue 30 Wed 31 Thu 1
G G G ½ B F

Qualification

The following eight teams qualified for the 1996 Olympics football tournament:

Venues

The tournament was held in five venues across five cities:

Squads

Match officials

Preliminary round

Group E

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  China PR 3 2 1 0 7 1 +6 7 Semi-finals
2  United States (H) 3 2 1 0 5 1 +4 7
3  Sweden 3 1 0 2 4 5 −1 3
4  Denmark 3 0 0 3 2 11 −9 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
(H) Host.
Attendance: 46,724[5]

Attendance: 28,000[6]
Referee: Bente Ovedie Skogvang (Norway)
Attendance: 34,871[7]

Attendance: 55,650[8]

Group F

Pos Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Norway 3 2 1 0 9 4 +5 7 Semi-finals
2  Brazil 3 1 2 0 5 3 +2 5
3  Germany 3 1 1 1 6 6 0 4
4  Japan 3 0 0 3 2 9 −7 0
Source: FIFA
Rules for classification: Tiebreakers
Germany 3-2 Japan
Wiegmann Goal 5
Tomei Goal 29 (o.g.)
Mohr Goal 52
Report (FIFA) Kioka Goal 18
Noda Goal 33
Attendance: 44,211[10]

Attendance: 26,111[12]

Attendance: 28,319[14]

Knockout stage

 
Semi-finalsFinal
 
      
 
July 28 - Athens, Georgia
 
 
 China PR3
 
August 1 - Athens
 
 Brazil2
 
 China PR1
 
July 28 - Athens, Georgia
 
 United States2
 
 Norway1
 
 
)2
 
Third place
 
 
August 1 - Athens
 
 
 Brazil0
 
 
 Norway2

Semi finals

China PR 3-2 Brazil
Qingmei Goal 5
Haiying Goal 8390
Report Roseli Goal 67
Pretinha Goal 72
Attendance: 64,196
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Attendance: 64,196
Referee: Sonia Denoncourt (Canada)

Bronze medal match

Brazil 0-2 Norway
Report Aarønes Goal 2125
Attendance: 76,489
Referee: Ingrid Jonsson (Sweden)

Gold medal match

Attendance: 76,489
Referee: Bente Ovedie Skogvang (Norway)

FIFA Fair play award

Goalscorers

With four goals, Pretinha of Brazil, Ann Kristin Aarønes and Linda Medalen of Norway are the top scorers in the tournament. In total, 53 goals were scored by 33 different players, with two of them credited as own goals.

4 goals

3 goals

2 goals

1 goal

Own goals

Final ranking

Rank Team Pld W D L GF GA GD Pts
1  United States (USA) 5 4 1 0 9 3 +6 13
2  China (CHN) 5 3 1 1 11 5 +6 10
3  Norway (NOR) 5 3 1 1 12 6 +6 10
4  Brazil (BRA) 5 1 2 2 7 8 -1 5
5  Germany (GER) 3 1 1 1 6 6 0 4
6  Sweden (SWE) 3 1 0 2 4 5 -1 3
7  Japan (JPN) 3 0 0 3 2 9 -7 0
8  Denmark (DEN) 3 0 0 3 2 11 -9 0

References

  1. ^ "U.S. Women's Soccer Team Wins Gold". WashingtonPost.com. August 2, 1996. Retrieved 2012.
  2. ^ GEORGE VECSEYPublished: August 2, 1996 (August 2, 1996). "Women's Soccer: 76,481 Fans, 1 U.S. Gold - New York Times". Nytimes.com. Retrieved 2012.
  3. ^ "Women Sports Get a Boost - New York Times". Nytimes.com. September 20, 1993. Retrieved 2012.
  4. ^ "USA - Denmark". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  5. ^ "Sweden - China PR". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  6. ^ "USA - Sweden". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  7. ^ "Denmark - China PR". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  8. ^ "USA - China PR". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  9. ^ "Denmark - Sweden". FIFA. Retrieved 2017.
  10. ^ "Germany - Japan". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  11. ^ "Norway - Brazil". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "Brazil - Japan". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  13. ^ "Norway - Germany". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  14. ^ "Brazil - Germany". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.
  15. ^ "Norway - Germany". FIFA. Retrieved 2019.

External links


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