Executive Order 13767
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Executive Order 13767

Executive Order 13767
Border Security and
Immigration Enforcement Improvements
Seal of the President of the United States
President Donald Trump displays the executive order, January 25, 2017
Executive Order 13767.pdf
Executive Order 13767, as published in the Federal Register
TypeExecutive order
Executive Order number13767
Signed byDonald Trump on January 25, 2017 (2017-01-25)
Federal Register details
Federal Register document number2017-02095
Publication dateJanuary 30, 2017 (2017-01-30)
Document citation82 FR 8793
Summary
  • Calls for construction of a physical wall across the southern border of the United States
  • Calls for the hiring of additional Border Patrol agents

Executive Order 13767, titled Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements, was issued by United States President Donald Trump on January 25, 2017.[1][2] The order directs a wall, colloquially called the "Trump wall",[3] to be built along the Mexico-United States border. On December 22, 2018, the federal government went into a shutdown due to Trump's demand for $5.6 billion in federal funds to begin work on the wall. By January 12, 2019, the shutdown became the longest budget shutdown in U.S. history.[4][5]

The wall was a central presidential campaign promise.[6] Trump stated in his 2015 announcement speech that the U.S. would "have Mexico pay for that wall",[7] and Mexican president Enrique Peña Nieto has stated that the country would "never pay for a wall".[8] The Trump administration is seeking $18 billion in funding.[9]

In late 2017 the Department of Homeland Security paid about $3 million for the construction of eight prototypes near San Diego, California, with local taxpayers spending about $2.3 million in security.[10] In November 2017 SWF Construction won an $18 million contract to replace an existing 2-mile wall[9] in Calexico, California. Construction began in February 2018.

As of March 2019, U.S. Customs and Border Protection confirmed that although they had begun replacement fencing, no new walls had yet been built.[11]

As of October 2019, 15 construction sites are currently planned or under way along the Southern US border to construct various segments of both new and replacement border barrier.[12]

Provisions

The order directs "executive departments and agencies ... to deploy all lawful means to secure the Nation's southern border, to prevent further illegal immigration into the United States, and to repatriate illegal aliens swiftly, consistently, and humanely", and states that "It is the policy of the executive branch to secure the southern border of the United States through the immediate construction of a physical wall on the southern border."[13]

Funding

The executive order, signed on January 25, 2017,[14] calls for construction of "a physical wall along the southern border" and defines wall as "a contiguous, physical wall or other similarly secure, contiguous, and impassable physical barrier."[13]

The order did not estimate a cost for the wall project.[15] An internal report by the Department of Homeland Security acquired by Reuters in February 2017 estimated that Trump's proposed border wall would take an estimated 3.5 years to build and cost $21.6 billion. The cost was higher than estimates given by Trump during the campaign, in part because it accounted for the time and cost of acquiring the required private land on the border.[16]

Federal budget shutdown in 2018-2019

On December 22, 2018, the federal government went into a shutdown due to Trump's demand for $5.6 billion in federal funds for a wall on the US-Mexico border. By January 12, 2019, the shutdown became the longest budget shutdown in U.S. history.[17][5]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Executive Order: Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements". White House Office of the Press Secretary. Retrieved 2017.
  2. ^ Jeremy Diamond (January 26, 2017). "Trump orders construction of border wall, boosts deportation force". CNN.
  3. ^ Lucy Rodgers and Dominic Bailey (January 21, 2019). "Trump wall - all you need to know about US border in seven charts". BBC News.
  4. ^ "Government Shutdown 2019".
  5. ^ a b "Due to the government shutdown, the National Christmas tree has gone dark".
  6. ^ Beck, Margery A. "Army Corps faces questions about vetting Nebraska startup given $11M border wall contract". chicagotribune.com. Retrieved 2018.
  7. ^ "Here's Donald Trump's Presidential Announcement Speech". Time. Retrieved 2018.
  8. ^ Siddiqui, Sabrina (May 30, 2018). "Mexico president hits back after Trump revives claim country will pay for wall". the Guardian. Retrieved 2018.
  9. ^ a b "Border wall work begins in downtown Calexico". Associated Press. February 21, 2018. Retrieved 2018.
  10. ^ Correspondent, Vanessa Yurkevich, Digital. "Trump's wall hasn't been built yet, but it's already cost taxpayers millions". CNN. Retrieved 2018.
  11. ^ "Donald Trump's Own Border Agency Admits No New Wall Has Been Built, Despite Trump Boasting About It". The Inquisitr. March 15, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  12. ^ "TRACK THE STATUS OF TRUMP'S BORDER WALL". www.TrumpWall.construction. October 7, 2019. Retrieved 2019.
  13. ^ a b "Executive Order: Border Security and Immigration Enforcement Improvements". White House Office of the Press Secretary. Retrieved 2017.
  14. ^ David Smith (January 26, 2017). "Trump signs order to begin Mexico border wall in immigration crackdown". The Guardian.CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  15. ^ Bill Lambrecht, Jason Buch & Aaron Nelsen, Trump orders 'immediate' construction of border wall, San Antonio Express-News (January 26, 2017).
  16. ^ Ainsley, Julia Edwards (February 9, 2017). "Trump border 'wall' to cost $21.6 billion, take 3.5 years to build: Homeland Security internal report". Reuters.
  17. ^ "Government Shutdown 2019".

  This article uses material from the Wikipedia page available here. It is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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