Codex Nanianus
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Codex Nanianus
Uncial 030
New Testament manuscript
Mark 5:18 (Tregelles facsimile edition)
Mark 5:18 (Tregelles facsimile edition)
NameNanianus
Venetus Marcianus
SignU
TextGospels
Date9th century
ScriptGreek
Now atBiblioteca Marciana, Venice
Size22.5 cm by 16.7 cm
TypeByzantine text-type
CategoryV
Handcarefully written
NoteUnique addition in John 8:8

Uncial 030, designated by siglum U or 030 (in the Gregory-Aland numbering), ? 90 (von Soden),[1] is a Greek uncial manuscript of the New Testament on parchment, dated palaeographically to the 9th century.[2] The manuscript has complex contents, with full marginalia (see picture).

The text of the codex usually follows the majority text, but with departures, some of them represent Alexandrian tradition. The manuscript is rarely cited in the present critical editions of the Greek New Testament.

Description

The codex contains 291 parchment leaves (22.5 cm by 16.7 cm), with a complete text of the four Gospels. The leaves are arranged in quarto (four leaves in quire). The text is written in two columns per page, and 21 lines per column,[2] in brown ink. According to Scrivener the manuscript is carefully and luxury written.[3] The ornaments are in gold and colours.[4]

The initial letters in gold and decorated. The letters are high, and round. They have breathings and accents.[5]

It is an ornamented codex, with full marginalia, as well illuminations such as pictures and golden ornaments. It is written in well rounded uncials, Letters are in general an imitation of those used before the introduction of compressed uncials.[5] The letters are compressed only at the end of line. It is shown in Tregelles' facsimile, the oblong omicrons creep at the end of lines 2 and 4.[3]Samuel Prideaux Tregelles found that the "letters are in general an imitation of those used before the introduction of compressed uncials; but they do not belong to the age when full and round writing was customary or natural, so that the stiffness and want of ease is manifest".[4]

The text is divided according to the (chapters), whose numbers are given at the margin, and their (titles) at the top of the pages. There is also another division according to the smaller Ammonian Sections, with references to the Eusebian Canons. Number of sections in Gospel of Mark is 233 (usual is 235), the last section in 16:8.[5]

It contains the Epistula ad Carpianum and Eusebian tables at the beginning of the manuscript, tables of the (tables of contents) before each Gospel, golden ornaments, subscriptions at the end of each Gospel, and pictures.[3] Before Gospel of Mark it has picture with the baptism of Jesus; before Gospel of John it has picture with the rays from the clouds, John stands, and Prochorus writes.[5]

Text of the codex

Text type

The Greek text of this codex is a representative of the Byzantine text-type. The non-Byzantine readings are confirmed by Codex Monacensis and minuscule 1071, though there is no real reason to think they are related.[6]

The manuscript stands in some relationship to the Codex Basilensis and other textual members of the textual family Family E, but Nanianus does not belong to this family.

Hermann von Soden classified its text to his textual group Io which refers to nine manuscripts in Luke. They do not form a group. According to Soden textual group Io, is a result of recension Pamphilus from Caeasarea (ca. 300 AD).[7]Aland placed it in Category V,[2] though it is not pure the Byzantine text, with a number non-Byzantine readings.

According to the Claremont Profile Method it represents textual family Kx in Luke 10, in Luke 1 and Luke 20 it has mixed Byzantine text. It is close to minuscules 974 and 1006 in Luke 1 and Luke 10.[7]

The manuscript contains the texts of the Signs of the times (Matthew 16:2b-3), Christ's agony at Gethsemane (Luke 22:43-44), John 5:3.4, and the Pericope Adulterae (John 7:53-8:11) without any mark,[8] which are considered inauthentic in the modern Critical editions. It contains the longer ending of Mark (16:9-20), but there is not the Ammonian Sections and Eusebian Canons at the margin.[5] In text of Pericope Adulterae it has several peculiar readings (see section below), some of them has textual affinities with Codex Tischendorfianus III.

Textual variants

Pericope Adulterae

In John 8:2 after it has reading ? instead of ?.[9]

In John 8:4 it reads (said) for ? (say); the reading is supported by Codex Tischendorfianus III.[10]

In John 8:7 it reads instead of or , along with Tischendorfianus III, manuscripts of Ferrar Group (f13), and 700.[11]

In John 8:8 the codex represents unique textual addition ? (sins of every one of them). This textual variant is supported by the manuscripts: Minuscule 73, 95, 331, 364, 413, 658, 700, 782, 1592, and some Armenian manuscripts. Minuscule 652 has this variant on the margin added by a later hand. Minuscule 264 has this textual variant in John 8:6.[11][12]

In John 8:10a it reads against reading: ? ? , and reading: . The reading of the codex is supported by the manuscripts: Tischendorfianus III, manuscripts of f13, 225, 700, 1077, 1443, Lectionary 185mg, and Ethiopic manuscripts.[12]

In John 8:10b it reads along with manuscripts: Seidelianus I, Vaticanus 354, manuscripts of Ferrar Family (f13), 28, 225, 700, 1009, instead of [?] as manuscripts Basilensis, Boreelianus, Seidelianus I, Cyprius, 1079, or as manuscripts Bezae, Campianus, Tischendorfianus IV, Tischendorfianus III, and manuscripts of Lake's Family (f1).[12]

In John 8:11 it reads ? ? against reading ? ? or ? ; the reading of the codex is supported by codices Tischendorfianus IV and minuscule 700.[11]

Alexandrian readings

In Matthew 2:15 - the same in Matthew 2:17 - it reads for ; the reading of the manuscript is supported by codices: Sinaiticus (?), Vaticanus (B), Ephraemi (C), Bezae (D), Dublinensis, Tischendorfianus IV, Sangallensis, Petropolitanus, the reading is supported by Basilensis, Cyprius, Regius, Campianus, Vaticanus 354, U, Mosquensis II.[13]

In Matthew 27:49 it has Alexandrian interpolation ?, ? ? ? (the other took a spear and pierced His side, and immediately came out water and blood), this reading was derived from John 19:34 - it is found in Codex Sinaiticus, Vaticanus, Ephraemi Rescriptus, Regius, Tischendorfianus IV, 1010, 1293, syrpal, ethmss.[14]

In John 1:29 ? ? is omitted, as in Alexandrian and old Byzantine manuscripts.[15]

In John 2:13 it has reading ? ? (Jesus to Jerusalem), majority of manuscripts has order ? ? (to Jerusalem Jesus); the reading of the codex is supported by the manuscripts: Papyrus 66, Papyrus 75, Codex Seidelianus I, Codex Regius, Campianus, Petropolitanus Purpureus, Uncial 0211, 1010 1505, lectionary 425, lectionary 640, and several other manuscripts.[16][17][18]

In John 4:35 it reads ? ?, majority of the manuscripts has ? ?.[19]

In John 5:5 it reads ? (thirty and eight years) as in Alexandrian manuscripts,[20] majority reads ? (thirty eight years). Word ? after is omitted.[21]

In John 5:16 phrase has Alexandrian sequence of words,[22] the majority has .[23]

In John 5:44 it reads ? as in Alexandrian manuscripts,[24] majority reads .[25]

In John 6:40 it reads as Alexandrian manuscripts,[26] majority reads .[27]

In John 6:54 it has reading ? as Alexandrian manuscripts,[28] majority reads .[29]

In John 7:8 it reads ? ? as Alexandrian manuscripts,[30] majority has ? ? ?.[31]

Other readings

Interpolation in Matthew 8:13

In Matthew 8:13 it has interpolation ? ? ? ? (and when the centurion returned to the house in that hour, he found the slave well). Sinaiticus, Ephraemi, Basilensis (with asterisk), Campianus, (Petropolitanus Purpureus), Koridethi, (0250), f1, (33, 1241), g1, syrh.[32][33]

In John 2:1 it reads (third day) for (the third day); the reading is supported by the manuscripts: Vaticanus, Koridethi, manuscripts of Ferrar Family, minuscule 196, minuscule 743.[17][34]

In John 2:3 it has unique reading ? ? (his mother said to him), all other manuscripts have ? ? (mother of Jesus said to him).[34]

In John 3:2 it reads ? (to him), majority of manuscripts have ? (to Jesus); the reading of the codex is supported by Sinaiticus, Alexandrinus, Vaticanus, Cyprius, Regius, Vaticanus 354, Macedoniensis, Sangallensis, Koridethi, Tischendorfianus III, Petropolitanus, Atous Lavrensis, Athous Dionysiou, Uncial 047, Uncial 0211, Minuscule 7, 9, 461, 565.[35][36]

In John 3:34 it has unique reading (by part) instead of (by measure); the reading is supported only by minuscule 1505.[35]

In John 4:51 it reads ? (son) for ? (servant), the reading of the codex is supported by Codex Bezae, Cyprius, Petropolitanus Purpureus, Petropolitanus, 0141, 33, 194, 196, 743, 817, 892, 1192, 1216, 1241.[37]

In John 6:3 phrase ? ? (Jesus on the mountain) has unique sequence of words, other manuscripts have ? ? (on the mountain Jesus).[38]

In John 6:24 it has unique reading ? (knew) for (saw); it is not supported by other manuscripts.[39]

In John 6:51 it has unique reading ? ? (about the life of the world), other manuscripts have ? ? (for the life of the world).[40]

In John 6:67 it has unique reading (disciples), it is supported by Codex Koridethi, other manuscripts have (twelve).[41]

In John 7:17 it has usual reading ?, but corrector changed it into , the reading is found in minuscules 1216 and 1519.[42]

In John 7:32 it has reading , the reading is supported by manuscripts: Papyrus 75, Vaticanus, Seidelianus I, Cyprius, Regius, Petropolitanus Purpureus, Borgianus, Washingtonianus, Koridethi, Petropolitanus, Athous Lavrensis, 0105, 0141, 9, 565, 1241.[43] Majority of manuscripts has this reading in sequence .[44]

In John 7:34 phrase ? ? ? is omitted (and where I am you cannot come). This omission is not supported by any examined manuscript.[45]

History

Andreas Birch dated the manuscript to the 10 or 11th century.[46]Scholz dated it to the 10th century. Scrivener writes that it dates "scarcely before the tenth century, although the letters are in general an imitation of those used before the introduction of compressed uncials". The present palaeographers dated the manuscript to the 9th century.[2] Tregelles[47] and Gregory dated it to the 9th or 10th century.[5]

The codex is named after its last owner, Giovanni Nanni (1432-1502).[3] The codex was described by Ferdinand Mingarelli.[48]

The first collator of the codex was Friedrich Münter (1761-1830), who sent some extracts from the text of the codex to Andreas Birch.[47] Birch used these extracts in his edition of the text of the four Gospels in Greek.[49] Then Birch examined the manuscript himself and gave its description in 1801:

In Bibliotheca Equitis Nanii codex asservatur charactere unciali exaratus Seculo X vel XI, complectens Qvattuor Evangelia cum Eusebii Canonibus. De hoc plura vide in Catalogo Codd. graecorum, qvi apud Nanios asservantur, studio et opera Mingarelli publicatam. Excerpta hujus codicis in adnotationibus hinc inde obvia, mecum communicavit Vir. Cl. Münter, cui etiam debeo notitiam duorum codicum qvi seqvuntur.[46]

It was slightly examined by Scholz.[5]Thomas Hartwell Horne gave this description of the codex:

The Codex Nanianus I., in the library of St. Mark, at Venice, contains the four Gospels with the Eusebian canons. It is nearly entire, and for the most part agrees with the Constantinopolitan recension. Dr. Birch, by whom it was first collated, refers it to the tenth of eleventh century; Dr. Scholz, to the tenth century.[50]

The text of the manuscript was collated by Tischendorf in 1843 and by Tregelles in 1846, thoroughly and independently. They compared their work at Leipzig for the purpose of mutual correction.[51] Tischendorf cited often the manuscript in his Editio Octava Critica Maior.[52] Gregory saw the manuscript in 1886.[5]

William Hatch published one page of the codex as photographic facsimile in 1939.[53]

Bruce M. Metzger did not describe the manuscript in his The Text of the New Testament...[54] or in Manuscripts of the Greek Bible...,[55] and it one of the very few uncial manuscripts with sigla (01-045) not described by Metzger. It means according to him it has low textual importance. The manuscript is rarely cited in critical editions of the Greek New Testament NA27/UBS4. It is not mentioned in Introduction to the 26th edition of Novum Testamentum Graece of Nestle-Aland.[56] It is often cited in The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (2007).

The codex currently is located, in Venice, the Biblioteca Marciana, ms Gr. I, 8 (=1397).[2][57]

See also

References

  1. ^ Hermann von Soden, Die Schriften des neuen Testaments, in ihrer ältesten erreichbaren Textgestalt / hergestellt auf Grund ihrer Textgeschichte (Berlin 1902), vol. 1, p. 130
  2. ^ a b c d e Aland, Kurt; Aland, Barbara (1995). The Text of the New Testament: An Introduction to the Critical Editions and to the Theory and Practice of Modern Textual Criticism. Erroll F. Rhodes (trans.). Grand Rapids: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company. p. 113. ISBN 978-0-8028-4098-1.
  3. ^ a b c d Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament. 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 149.
  4. ^ a b S. P. Tregelles, An Introduction to the Critical study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures (London 1856), p. 202
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h Gregory, Caspar René (1900). Textkritik des Neuen Testaments. 1. Leipzig: J.C. Hinrichs'sche Buchhandlung. p. 75.
  6. ^ Codex Nanianus, U (30): at the Encyclopedia of Textual Criticism
  7. ^ a b Frederik Wisse, The profile method for the classification and evaluation of manuscript evidence, William B. Eerdmans Publishing, 1982, p. 52
  8. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft, Stuttgart 2007, p. 95
  9. ^ Nestle, Eberhard; Nestle, Erwin; Aland, Kurt (1991). Novum Testamentum Graece (26 ed.). Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft. p. 273.
  10. ^ NA26, p. 273
  11. ^ a b c Nestle, Eberhard; Nestle, Erwin; Aland, Kurt (1991). Novum Testamentum Graece (26 ed.). Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft. p. 274.
  12. ^ a b c The Greek New Testament, ed. K. Aland, A. Black, C. M. Martini, B. M. Metzger, and A. Wikgren, in cooperation with INTF, United Bible Societies, 3rd edition, (Stuttgart 1983), p. 357. [UBS3]
  13. ^ Editio octava critica maior, p. 7
  14. ^ Editio octava critica maior, p. 203
  15. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 7
  16. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 16
  17. ^ a b NA26, p. 251
  18. ^ Editio octava critica maior, p. 759
  19. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 37
  20. ^ NA26, p. 260
  21. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 44
  22. ^ Nestle, Eberhard; Nestle, Erwin; Aland, Kurt (1991). Novum Testamentum Graece (26 ed.). Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft. p. 261.
  23. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 47
  24. ^ Nestle, Eberhard; Nestle, Erwin; Aland, Kurt (1991). Novum Testamentum Graece (26 ed.). Stuttgart: Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft. p. 263.
  25. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 55
  26. ^ NA26, p. 266
  27. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 71
  28. ^ NA26, p. 267
  29. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition), p. 75
  30. ^ NA26, p. 270
  31. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 82
  32. ^ NA26, p. 18
  33. ^ Editio octava critica maior, p. 37
  34. ^ a b The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 13
  35. ^ a b The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 20
  36. ^ Editio octava critica maior, p. 762
  37. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 42
  38. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 57
  39. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition (Deutsche Bibelgesellschaft: Stuttgart 2007), p. 65
  40. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 73
  41. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 79
  42. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 84
  43. ^ NA26, p. 271
  44. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 88
  45. ^ The Gospel According to John in the Byzantine Tradition, p. 89
  46. ^ a b A. Birch, Variae Lectiones ad Textum IV Evangeliorum, Haunie 1801, pp. LXV-LXVI
  47. ^ a b S. P. Tregelles, An Introduction to the Critical study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures (London 1856), p. 203
  48. ^ F. Mingarelli, Graeci codices apud Nanianos Bologna 1784, p. 1
  49. ^ Quatuor Evangelia graece, cum variantibus a textu lectionibus codd. MSS. bibliothecae Vaticanae, Barberinae, Laurentianae, Vindobonensis, Escurialensis, Havniensis Regia, quibus accedunt, lectiones versionum syrarum, veteris, Philoxenianae, et Hierosolymitanae, ed. by Andreas Birch (Copenhagen, 1788)
  50. ^ Thomas Horne, An Introduction to the Critical Study and Knowledge of the Holy Scriptures, New York 1852, vol 1, p. 236
  51. ^ Scrivener, Frederick Henry Ambrose; Edward Miller (1894). A Plain Introduction to the Criticism of the New Testament. 1 (4 ed.). London: George Bell & Sons. p. 150.
  52. ^ Novum Testamentum Graece: ad antiquissimos testes denuo recensuit, apparatum criticum omni studio perfectum. Editio Octava Critica Maior, C. v. Tischendorf, vol. I (Leipzig 1869)
  53. ^ W. H. P. Hatch, The Principal Uncial Manuscripts of the New Testament (Cambridge 1939), p. LXII
  54. ^ Metzger, Bruce M.; Ehrman, Bart D. (2005). The Text of the New Testament: Its Transmission, Corruption and Restoration (4 ed.). New York - Oxford: Oxford University Press. p. 80. ISBN 978-0-19-516122-9.
  55. ^ Bruce M. Metzger, Manuscripts of the Greek Bible: An Introduction to Palaeography, Oxford University Press, Oxford 1981
  56. ^ NA26, Introduction, p. 49*
  57. ^ "Liste Handschriften". Münster: Institute for New Testament Textual Research. Retrieved 2013.

Further reading

Facsimile
  • W. H. P. Hatch, The Principal Uncial Manuscripts of the New Testament (Cambridge 1939), p. LXII (Plate)
Critical edition of the Greek New Testament
Related articles
  • Russell Champlin, Family E and Its Allies in Matthew (Studies and Documents, XXIII; Salt Lake City, UT, 1967)
  • J. Greelings, Family E and Its Allies in Mark (Studies and Documents, XXXI; Salt Lake City, UT, 1968)
  • J. Greelings, Family E and Its Allies in Luke (Studies and Documents, XXXV; Salt Lake City, UT, 1968)
  • Frederik Wisse, Family E and the Profile Method, Biblica 51, (1970), pp. 67-75

External links


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